Cover art for History of the Ancient World: A Global Perspective

History of the Ancient World: A Global Perspective

61 ratings

Summary

The ancient world has cast a long shadow, influencing our customs and religious beliefs, our laws, and the form of our governments. It has taught us when and how we make war or pursue peace. It has shaped the buildings we live and work in and the art we hang on our walls. It has given us the calendar that organizes our year and has left its mark on the games we play. Grasping the full scope of your bequest from the ancient world can't help but give you a more nuanced base from which to make decisions and choose pathways in your own life. These 48 lectures take you on a multidisciplinary journey that ranges across not only the traditional domains of politics and war that are normally the province of history courses, but also those of religion, philosophy, architecture and the visual arts, literature, and science, and more. You'll examine the ancient world's greatest civilizations from the Mediterranean, Asia, and the Americas - including those of Rome, Greece, China, Persia, India, and the Maya - not in isolation but in the full context of where they came from, the cultures that flourished around them at the same time, and the civilizations that were to come from them. Taking a comparative approach, Professor Aldrete's course includes in-depth analyses of not only key individuals and historical moments, but also history's most important themes, from the nature of rulership and the evolution of religion and philosophy to the practice of warfare and the expression of power through art and architecture. With its mix of nuanced interpretation, vivid description, and constant attention to exploring history as a coherent whole, this is sure to be one of the most informative and thought-provoking history courses you have ever taken. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2011 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2011 The Great Courses

Available on Audible
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The Lessons of History

96 ratings

Summary

The authors devoted five decades to the study of world history and philosophy, culminating in the masterful 11-volume Story of Civilization. In this compact summation of their work, Will and Ariel Durant share the vital and profound lessons of our collective past. Their perspective, gained after a lifetime of thinking and writing about the history of humankind, is an invaluable resource for us today. The rare archival recordings of the Durants in conversation, made from 1957-1977, illuminate our present condition and offer insightful guidance for the future.

©2004 John Little, Monica Ariel Mihell, and William James Durant Easton (P)2004 Durant archival recordings 1957-1977 used with permission of John Little, Monica Ariel Mihell, and William James Durant Easton

Length: 5 hrs and 35 mins
Available on Audible
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The Vikings

103 ratings

Summary

As raiders and explorers, the Vikings played a decisive role in the formation of Latin Christendom, and particularly of western Europe. Now, in a series of 36 vivid lectures by an honored teacher and classical scholar, you have the opportunity to understand this remarkable race as never before, studying the Vikings not only as warriors, but in all of the other roles in which they were equally extraordinary - merchants, artists, kings, raiders, seafarers, shipbuilders, and creators of a remarkable literature of myths and sagas. Professor Harl draws insights from an astonishing array of sources: The Russian Primary Chronicle (a Slavic text from medieval Kiev), 13th-century Icelandic poems and sagas, Byzantine accounts, Arab geographies, annals of Irish monks who faced Viking raids, Roman reports, and scores of other firsthand contemporary documents. Among the topics you'll explore are the profound influence of the Norse gods and heroes on Viking culture and the Vikings' extraordinary accomplishments as explorers and settlers in Iceland, Greenland, and Vinland. And with the help of archaeological findings, you'll learn to analyze Viking ship burials, rune stones and runic inscriptions, Viking wood carving, jewelry, sculpture, and metalwork. By the end of the series, you'll have a new understanding of what it meant to be a Viking and a richer appreciation of this remarkable race - a people who truly defined the history of Europe, and whose brave, adventurous, and creative spirit still survives today. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your My Library section along with the audio.

©2005 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2005 The Great Courses

Length: 17 hrs and 59 mins
Available on Audible
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The Early Middle Ages

92 ratings

Summary

The Early Middle Ages - the years from A.D. 650 to 1000 - were crucial to Europe's future social and political development. These 24 lectures trace a journey from Scandinavia across northern and central Europe to the farthest reaches of the Byzantine and Islamic empires, providing an exciting new look an era often simply called the "Dark Ages." Given the period's dismal reputation and its temporal remoteness from the 21st century, you'll be surprised to learn about some of the most challenging questions historians have ever had to tackle: Why did the Roman Empire fall? Why did the ancient world give way to the medieval world? Why did Christian monotheism become the dominant religion in Europe? You'll meet some of the era's exciting figures, such as St. Augustine and Justinian, and you'll consider the extent to which the historical realities of King Arthur and Charlemagne match up to the legends that have become attached to their names. You'll also look at the era's effect on the Vikings, the rise of the Carolingians, and the golden age of Islamic rule in Spain. Professor Daileader also explores the contrasting historical theories offered by two extremely influential historians: Edward Gibbon, the English author of the monumental The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, whose explanations closely followed those of the Roman moralists of the 4th and 5th centuries; and Henri Pirenne, the Belgian thinker who injected a newfound emphasis on social and especially economic factors into the analysis of history. You'll see why the era belies its reputation as dark and dismal, but you'll come away with a new appreciation for this once-lost era. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2004 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2004 The Great Courses

Length: 12 hrs and 32 mins
Available on Audible
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Bronze Age Mindset

37 ratings

Summary

The Atlantic named this author as possibly Steve Bannon's contact in the White House (Rosie Gray, The Atlantic, Feb 10, 2017: "'Think you should speak directly to my WH cutout/cell leader,' Yarvin said in an email. 'I've never met him and don't know his identity, we just DM on Twitter. He's said to be ‘very close’ to Bannon.... Goal is to intimidate Congress with pure masculine show of youth, energy. Trump is said to know, will coordinate with powerful EOs...."); and a recent Vox article (Tara Isabella Burton, Vox, June 1, 2018) claimed he is the "text" to Jordan Peterson's "subtext" and a "distilled" form of Peterson. Distilled means purer: yes, so why not listen and understand the purer version? T. I. Burton also adds in this article that this author, Bronze Age Pervert, is a kind of priest-king to thousands on Twitter and outside and is possibly leading a spiritual reawakening.   Some say that this work, found in a safe-box in the port area of Kowloon, was dictated because Bronze Age Pervert refuses to learn what he calls "the low and plebeian art of writing". It isn't known how this work was transcribed. The contents are pure dynamite.  He explains that you live in ant farm. That you are observed by the lords of lies, ritually probed. Ancient man had something you have lost: confidence in his instincts and strength, knowledge in his blood. BAP shows how the Bronze Age mind-set can set you free from this iron prison and help you embark on the path of power.   He talks about life, biology, hormones. He gives many examples from history, both ancient and modern. He shows the secrets of the detrimental robots, how they hide and fabricate. He helps you escape gynocracy and ascend to fresh mountain air.   Praise be to the Pervert. Praise be to his teaching of peace. Be careful.

©2018 Bronze Age Pervert (P)2018 Bronze Age Pervert

Length: 5 hrs and 32 mins
Available on Audible
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The History of the Medieval World

61 ratings

Summary

From the schism between Rome and Constantinople to the rise of the T'ang Dynasty, from the birth of Muhammad to the crowning of Charlemagne, this erudite book tells the fascinating, often violent story of kings, generals, and the peoples they ruled. In her earlier work, The History of the Ancient World, Susan Wise Bauer wrote of the rise of kingship based on might. But in the years between the fourth and the 12th centuries, rulers had to find new justification for their power, and they turned to divine truth or grace to justify political and military action. Right thus replaces might as the engine of empire. Not just Christianity and Islam but the religions of the Persians and the Germans, and even Buddhism, are pressed into the service of the state. This phenomenon---stretching from the Americas all the way to Japan---changes religion, but it also changes the state.

©2010 Susan Wise Bauer (P)2010 Tantor

Length: 22 hrs and 42 mins
Available on Audible
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The History of Ancient Egypt

210 ratings

Summary

Ancient Egyptian civilization is so grand our minds sometimes have difficulty adjusting to it. It lasted 3,000 years, longer than any other on the planet. Its Great Pyramid of Cheops was the tallest building in the world until well into the 19th century and remains the only Ancient Wonder still standing. And it was the most technologically advanced of the ancient civilizations, with the medical knowledge that made Egyptian physicians the most famous in the world. Yet even after deciphering its hieroglyphs, and marveling at its scarabs, mummies, obelisks, and sphinxes, Egyptian civilization remains one of history's most mysterious, as "other" as it is extraordinary. This chronological survey presents the complete history of ancient Egypt's three great Kingdoms: the Old Kingdom, when the pyramids were built and Egypt became a nation under the supreme rule of the pharaoh and the rules of Egyptian art were established; the Middle Kingdom, when Egypt was a nation fighting to restore its greatness; and the New Kingdom, when all the names we know today-Hatshepsut, Tutankhamen, Ramses the Great, Cleopatra, and others-first appeared. Professor Brier's 48 lectures glisten with the kind of vivid anecdotes and human glimpses that make this ancient world breathe again. "The fun of history is in the details," he notes. "Knowing that Ramses the Great was crippled by arthritis for the last decade of his long life makes us more sympathetic to the boastful monarch who fathered more than 100 children. If we understand what it was like to be a miner sent to the turquoise mines in the Sinai mountains in the summer, we will feel a kinship with our long-dead counterparts." PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your My Library section along with the audio.

©1999 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)1999 The Great Courses

Length: 24 hrs and 25 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for 24 heures dans la Rome Antique

24 heures dans la Rome Antique

1 rating

Summary

Comment était-ce de vivre dans l'une des villes les plus puissantes et les plus animées du monde antique, une ville huit fois plus densément peuplée que l'est New York de nos jours ? Dans ce guide aussi divertissant qu'instructif, l'historien à succès Philip Matyszak nous présente différentes personnes qui ont vécu et travaillé dans la Rome antique. À chaque heure de la journée, nous faisons la rencontre d'un nouveau personnage, de l'empereur à la jeune esclave, du gladiateur à l'astrologue, de la guérisseuse au fabricant d'horloges à eau, et découvrons les détails fascinants de leur vie quotidienne.

©2020 Michael O'Mara. Traduit par Claire Sarradel (P)2020 Audible Studios

Length: 7 hrs and 46 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The High Middle Ages

The High Middle Ages

65 ratings

Summary

At the dawn of the last millennium in the year 1000, Europe was one of the world's more stagnant regions - an economically undeveloped, intellectually derivative, and geopolitically passive backwater, with illiteracy, starvation, and disease the norm for almost everyone. Yet only three centuries later, all of this had changed. A newly invigorated cluster of European societies had revived city life, spawned new spiritual and intellectual movements and educational institutions, and had begun, for reasons both sacred and profane, to expand at the expense of neighbors who traditionally had expanded at Europe's expense. This series of 24 lectures, filled with memorable detail, examines how and why Europeans achieved this stunning turnaround. By its conclusion, you will be able to describe and analyze the social, intellectual, religious, and political transformations that set into motion this midsummer epoch of the medieval world - an epoch you will come to know very well through Professor Daileader's vivid descriptions and examinations of its people, including the warrior aristocracy of knights, castellans, counts, and dukes; free and unfree peasants; and townspeople, both artisans and merchants; its vibrant stirrings of religion and intellect, including monastic life and charismatic figures like Francis of Assisi and Thomas Aquinas; the lives of those outside the religious mainstream, especially heretics and Jews; and its major political developments and events, including the First Crusade, the Norman Conquest of England, and the granting of the Magna Carta. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2001 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2001 The Great Courses

Length: 12 hrs and 25 mins
Available on Audible
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Antiquity

Summary

Best-selling author Norman Cantor delivers this compact but magisterial survey of the ancient world - from the birth of Sumerian civilization around 3500 BC in the Tigris-Euphrates valley (present-day Iraq) to the fall of the Roman Empire in AD 476. In Antiquity, Cantor covers such subjects as Classical Greece, Judaism, the founding of Christianity, and the triumph and decline of Rome. In this fascinating and comprehensive analysis, the author explores social and cultural history, as well as the political and economic aspects of his narrative. He explains leading themes in religion and philosophy and discusses the environment, population, and public health. With his signature authority and insight, Cantor highlights the great books and ideas of antiquity that continue to influence culture today.

©2003 Norman F. Cantor (P)2021 Tantor

Narrator: David Stifel
Length: 10 hrs and 24 mins
Available on Audible
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24 Hours in Ancient Rome

3 ratings

Summary

Walk a day in a Roman's sandals. What was it like to live in one of the ancient world's most powerful and bustling cities - one that was eight times more densely populated than modern-day New York? In this entertaining and enlightening guide, best-selling historian Philip Matyszak introduces us to the people who lived and worked there. In each hour of the day, we meet a new character - from emperor to slave girl, gladiator to astrologer, medicine woman to water-clock maker - and discover the fascinating details of their daily lives.

©2017 Philip Matszak (P)2017 Audible, Ltd

Narrator: John Telfer
Length: 7 hrs and 2 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The History of Ancient Rome

The History of Ancient Rome

60 ratings

Summary

Even today, the influence of Ancient Rome is indelible, with Europe and the world owing this extraordinary empire a huge cultural debt in almost every important category of human endeavor, including art, architecture, engineering, language, literature, law, and religion. At the peak of its power, Rome's span was vast. In the regional, restless, and shifting history of continental Europe, the Roman Empire stands as a towering monument to scale and stability, unified in politics and law, stretching from the sands of Syria to the moors of Scotland. And it stood for almost 700 years. In this series of 48 spirited lectures, you'll see how a small village of shepherds and farmers rose to tower over the civilized world of its day and left a permanent mark on history. In telling Rome's riveting story, Professor Fagan draws on a wealth of primary and secondary sources, including recent historical and archaeological scholarship, to introduce the fascinating tale of Rome's rise and decline, including the famous events and personalities that have become so familiar: Horatius at the bridge Hannibal crossing the Alps during Rome's life-or-death war with Carthage Caesar being assassinated before a statue of his archrival Pompey The doomed lovers Antony and Cleopatra The mad and venal emperors Nero and Caligula The conversion of Constantine. The course also addresses one of history's greatest questions: Why did the Roman Empire fall? And you'll learn why most modern scholars believe that the empire did not "fall" at all, but, rather, changed into something very different - the less urbanized, more rural, early medieval world. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©1999 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)1999 The Great Courses

Length: 22 hrs and 40 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

29 ratings

Summary

Here in a single volume is the entire, unabridged recording of Gibbon's masterpiece. Beginning in the second century at the apex of the Pax Romana, Gibbon traces the arc of decline and complete destruction through the centuries across Europe and the Mediterranean. It is a thrilling and cautionary tale of splendor and ruin, of faith and hubris, and of civilization and barbarism. Follow along as Christianity overcomes paganism... before itself coming under intense pressure from Islam. It is a story that begins in Rome and ends in the capture of Constantinople by the Turks almost 1,500 years later. To aid in navigating this massive work, please refer to the accompanying PDF, which contains a table of contents and starting times for each chapter. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your My Library section along with the audio.

Public Domain (P)2015 Audio Connoisseur

Length: 126 hrs and 31 mins
Available on Audible
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SPQR

36 ratings

Summary

A sweeping, revisionist history of the Roman Empire from one of our foremost classicists. Ancient Rome was an imposing city even by modern standards, a sprawling imperial metropolis of more than a million inhabitants, a "mixture of luxury and filth, liberty and exploitation, civic pride and murderous civil war" that served as the seat of power for an empire that spanned from Spain to Syria. Yet how did all this emerge from what was once an insignificant village in central Italy? In SPQR, world-renowned classicist Mary Beard narrates the unprecedented rise of a civilization that even 2,000 years later still shapes many of our most fundamental assumptions about power, citizenship, responsibility, political violence, empire, luxury, and beauty. From the foundational myth of Romulus and Remus to 212 CE, nearly a thousand years later, when the emperor Caracalla gave Roman citizenship to every free inhabitant of the empire, SPQR (the abbreviation of "The Senate and People of Rome") not just examines how we think of ancient Rome but challenges the comfortable historical perspectives that have existed for centuries by exploring how the Romans thought of themselves: how they challenged the idea of imperial rule, how they responded to terrorism and revolution, and how they invented a new idea of citizenship and nation. Opening the audiobook in 63 BCE with the famous clash between the populist aristocrat Catiline and Cicero, the renowned politician and orator, Beard animates this "terrorist conspiracy", which was aimed at the very heart of the republic, demonstrating how this singular event would presage the struggle between democracy and autocracy that would come to define much of Rome's subsequent history. Illustrating how a classical democracy yielded to a self-confident and self-critical empire, SPQR reintroduces us, though in a wholly different way, to famous and familiar characters.

©2015 Mary Beard (P)2015 Recorded Books

Narrator: Phyllida Nash
Author: Mary Beard
Length: 18 hrs and 30 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The History of the Ancient World

The History of the Ancient World

113 ratings

Summary

A lively and engaging narrative history showing the common threads in the cultures that gave birth to our own. This is the first volume in a bold new series that tells the stories of all peoples, connecting historical events from Europe to the Middle East to the far coast of China, while still giving weight to the characteristics of each country. Susan Wise Bauer provides both sweeping scope and vivid attention to the individual lives that give flesh to abstract assertions about human history. This narrative history employs the methods of "history from beneath" - literature, epic traditions, private letters, and accounts - to connect kings and leaders with the lives of those they ruled. The result is an engrossing tapestry of human behavior from which we may draw conclusions about the direction of world events and the causes behind them. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2007 Susan Wise Bauer (P)2013 Audible, Inc.

Narrator: John Lee
Length: 26 hrs and 20 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Crush It Like Cleopatra

Crush It Like Cleopatra

13 ratings

Summary

After advice on which skin care will get you glowing? Our gal Cleo knew a thing or two. Feeling a bit gloomy? Aristotle’s got a cure for that. Never quite sure which cutlery to use at social occasions, or how to boost your fitness? Join three curious comedians and their trusty guru as they dig up some of history’s most bizarre life hacks and put them to the test. From how to bag that hot date, to tips on excelling at work – the team get busy building the ultimate collection of archaeological-advice so you too can Crush It Like Cleopatra. Whatever your woe, ditch your fave self-help blog and join our team on a quest to see if our prudent predecessors had it right all along. Our comedy crew Emily, Mawaan and Sindhu will take the tips for a test drive and report back with honest reviews you can really trust. A TBI Media production for Audible Originals. This is an Audible Original Podcast. Free for members. You can download all 6 episodes to your Library now.

©2020 Audible, Ltd. (P)2020 Audible, Ltd.

Author: Sera Baker
Length: 3 hrs and 15 mins
Available on Audible
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The Peloponnesian War

13 ratings

Summary

Historians universally agree that Thucydides was the greatest historian who has ever lived, and that his story of the Peloponnesian conflict is a marvel of forensic science and fine literature. That such a triumph of intellectual accomplishment was created at the end of the fifth century B.C. in Greece is, perhaps, not so surprising, given the number of original geniuses we find in that period. But that such an historical work would also be simultaneously acknowledged as a work of great literature and a penetrating ethical evaluation of humanity is one of the miracles of ancient history. For in the pages of Thucydides we find examples of every ethical and political problem ever faced by democratic governments in the last 2,400 years. And it was all organized and written with a breathtaking skill and dramatic intensity which have never been equalled. Thucydides was an Athenian noble born around 455 B.C. whose antecedents could be traced back to the great Peisitratus and Cimon. In 424 B.C., Thucydides was in command of naval forces attempting to defend Amphipolis in Thrace. Although unsuccessful through no fault of his own, his enemies in Athens blamed him for failure and engineered his exile. It was a fortunate event, for it was upon this accident of history that Thucydides gained the opportunity to become the chronicler of events in Greece. In complete contrast to the furious passions which raged around him, he described events with a cool detachment and an absolute impartiality that is little short of miraculous. He is believed to have died violently, perhaps while writing, in about 400 B.C. His manuscript simply breaks off in mid paragraph. The Peloponnesian War is organized into eight parts (“books”). This recording uses the highly esteemed translation of Benjamin Jowett. There are several essays preceding and following the work.

Public Domain (P)2012 Audio Connoisseur

Author: Thucydides
Length: 26 hrs and 17 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Story of Medieval England: From King Arthur to the Tudor Conquest

The Story of Medieval England: From King Arthur to the Tudor Conquest

76 ratings

Summary

These 36 lectures tell the remarkable story of a tumultuous thousand-year period in the history of England. Dominated by war, conquest, and the struggle to balance the stability brought by royal power with the rights of the governed, it was a period that put into place the foundation of much of the world we know today. As you journey through this largely chronological narrative - occasionally interrupted for lecture-long explorations of specific topics - you'll see key themes emerge, including the assimilation of successive waves of invaders, the tense relationship between kings and the nobility, and the constant battles over money and taxation. And because so much of history is driven by specific individuals and not just historical circumstance, each lecture is rich in intimate portraits that reveal those individuals at the key moments of their historical destiny, including Alfred the Great, William the Conqueror, Eleanor of Aquitaine, and John Wycliffe.The result is a lecture series that winds up being not only informative but deeply entertaining, with each lecture drawing you in with its own particular fascinations, including a probing look at the scope of the Black Death, a realistic examination of the legends of both King Arthur and Robin Hood, a riveting description of the Battle of Bosworth Field, and a discussion of the surprisingly nuanced penalties of the early Germanic law codes. These lectures consistently deliver a fresh level of understanding about medieval England, its rulers and subjects, and their significance for the world we live in today. The chain of theme and event that links our world to theirs will never be clearer, rewarding every moment you spend with this series. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2010 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2010 The Great Courses

Narrator: Jennifer Paxton
Length: 19 hrs and 7 mins
Available on Audible
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Parallel Lives of the Noble Greeks and Romans

6 ratings

Summary

Plutarch (c. AD 46-AD 120) was born to a prominent family in the small Greek town of Chaeronea, about 20 miles east of Delphi in the region known as Boeotia. His best known work is Parallel Lives, a series of biographies of famous Greeks and Romans, arranged in pairs to illuminate their common moral virtues and vices. The surviving Lives contain 23 pairs, each with one Greek life and one Roman life as well as four unpaired single lives. Currently only 19 of the parallel lives end with comparisons while possibly all of them did at one time. Plutarch was not concerned with history so much as the influence of character, good or bad, on the lives and destinies of men. Whereas sometimes he barely touched on epoch-making events, he devoted much space to charming anecdotes and incidental triviality, reasoning that this often revealed far more about his subjects than even their most famous accomplishments. In many ways he must be counted among the earliest moral philosophers. This volume follows the translation of Arthur Hugh Clough and John Dryden. Please see the accompanying PDF file for duration and starting times of all biographies. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

Public Domain (P)2015 Audio Connoisseur

Author: Plutarch
Length: 83 hrs and 11 mins
Available on Audible
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SPQR

145 ratings

Summary

Ancient Rome matters. Its history of empire, conquest, cruelty and excess is something against which we still judge ourselves. Its myths and stories - from Romulus and Remus to the rape of Lucretia - still strike a chord with us. And its debates about citizenship, security and the rights of the individual still influence our own debates on civil liberty today. SPQR is a new look at Roman history from one of the world's foremost classicists. It explores not only how Rome grew from an insignificant village in central Italy to a power that controlled territory from Spain to Syria but also how the Romans thought about themselves and their achievements and why they are still important to us. Covering 1,000 years of history and casting fresh light on the basics of Roman culture, from slavery to running water, as well as exploring democracy, migration, religious controversy, social mobility and exploitation in the larger context of the empire, this is a definitive history of ancient Rome. SPQR is the Romans' own abbreviation for their state: Senatus Populusque Romanus, 'the Senate and People of Rome'.

©2015 Mary Beard (P)2015 Audible, Ltd

Narrator: Phyllida Nash
Author: Mary Beard
Length: 18 hrs and 30 mins
Available on Audible
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The Histories

7 ratings

Summary

Herodotus was a Greek historian born in Halicarnassus, subject at the time of the great Persian Empire. He lived in the fifth century BC (c. 484 - c. 425 BC), a contemporary of Socrates. He is often referred to as "The Father of History", a title originally conferred by Cicero. Herodotus was the first historian known to have broken from Homeric tradition in order to treat historical subjects as a method of investigation, specifically by collecting his materials in a critical, systematic fashion and then arranging them into a chronological narrative. The Histories (also known as The Persian Wars) is the only work Herodotus is known to have produced. It is a record of his inquiry into the origins of the Greco-Persian Wars, including a wealth of geographical and ethnographical information. Some of his stories were fanciful and others inaccurate. Yet he states that he was reporting only what he was told. A sizable portion of the information he provided was later confirmed by historians and archaeologists. Despite Herodotus' historical significance, very little is known of his personal life and academic history. The work is divided into nine sections, or "books". This version of The Histories is by A. D. Godley, first published in 1920. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

Public Domain (P)2017 Audio Connoisseur

Length: 27 hrs and 58 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for A Fatal Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum

A Fatal Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum

Summary

An entertaining and informative look at the unique culture of crime, punishment, and killing in ancient Rome In ancient Rome, all the best stories have one thing in common - murder. Romulus killed Remus to found the city; Caesar was assassinated to save the Republic. Caligula was butchered in the theater; Claudius was poisoned at dinner; and Galba was beheaded in the Forum. In one 50-year period, 26 emperors were murdered. But what did killing mean in a city where gladiators fought to the death to sate a crowd? In A Fatal Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, Emma Southon examines a trove of real-life homicides from Roman history to explore Roman culture, including how perpetrator, victim, and the act itself were regarded by ordinary people. Inside ancient Rome’s darkly fascinating history, we see how the Romans viewed life and death and what it means to be human.

©2021 Emma Southon. Published in 2021 by Abrams Press, an imprint of ABRAMS, New York. All rights reserved (P)2021 Blackstone Publishing

Narrator: Sophie Ward
Author: Emma Southon
Length: 11 hrs and 12 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Roman Empire: From Augustus to the Fall of Rome

The Roman Empire: From Augustus to the Fall of Rome

17 ratings

Summary

When Octavian, who took the title of Augustus as the first emperor of Rome, defeated Mark Antony to become the sole ruler of the Roman world, it was a major turning point in Western civilization. Not only did his decades-long rule completely transform the old Roman Republic into the Roman Empire, but it also profoundly shaped the culture and history of our world today. The Roman Empire: From Augustus to the Fall of Rome traces this breathtaking history from the empire’s foundation by Augustus to its Golden Age in the 2nd century CE through a series of ever-worsening crises until its ultimate disintegration. Taught by acclaimed Professor Gregory S. Aldrete of the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, these 24 captivating lectures offer you the chance to experience this story like never before, incorporating the latest historical insights that challenge our previous notions of Rome’s decline. You’ll examine the major events and familiar figures of the Roman Empire, including: The political innovations of Augustus The mental instability and cruel acts of Caligula and Nero Writers such as Ovid, Horace, and Virgil The stoic philosophy of Marcus Aurelius Constantine’s startling conversion to Christianity You’ll also look beyond the famous figures and delve deeply into the lives of ordinary Roman citizens. You’ll hear the messages they left on tombstones or scribbled on walls as graffiti; examine what life was really like for average city-dwellers and the hazards they faced every day; spend a day at Rome’s spectacular public entertainments, such as gladiator games and chariot races; and explore some of the city’s marvelous architectural and engineering works, including the Pantheon and the aqueducts. We cannot truly understand ourselves unless we comprehend the vital influences of Rome on the modern world - and the lessons the empire can still teach us. The Roman Empire: From Augustus to the Fall of Rome is an excellent guide to one of the most important periods in world history. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.

©2019 The Great Courses (P)2019 The Teaching Company, LLC

Length: 12 hrs and 41 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Roman Emperors

Roman Emperors

Summary

If you want to discover the captivating lives of five Roman Emperors, then pay attention.... Five captivating manuscripts in one book: Augustus: A Captivating Guide to the First Emperor of Rome and How He Ruled the Roman Empire Tiberius: A Captivating Guide to the Life of Ancient Rome’s Second Emperor and How He Ruled the Roman Empire Nero: A Captivating Guide to the Last Emperor of the Julio-Claudian Dynasty and How He Ruled the Roman Empire Constantine the Great: A Captivating Guide to the First Christian Roman Emperor and How He Ruled the Roman Empire Justinian I: A Captivating Guide to Justinian the Great and How This Emperor Ruled the Roman Empire The life of Augustus is historically important because his leadership marked out a new era in the story of the Roman world, an era that would see the expansion of the Roman Empire across the Mediterranean and beyond. Tiberius is remembered, if he is remembered at all, for his bad behavior. He spent much of his rule on a Greek island surrounded by every pleasure that his diseased flesh could dream of, abandoning his empire to scandal and intrigue. Nero’s extravagance has become nothing short of legendary. In its day, it was incredibly destructive to his people, particularly after the Great Fire of Rome, a fire that he may have even started. Constantine the Great is a complex figure surrounded by controversies and contradictions.  While the name Justinian may not be one that instantly strikes a chord with people, his life and his legacy continue to impact people all over the world to this day. It is very likely that as you read this, you are living your life in accordance with laws that came about as a result of Justinian’s rewriting of the old Roman codes.  If you want to learn more about the lives of these five Roman Emperors, scroll up and click the "add to cart" button!

©2020 Captivating History (P)2020 Captivating History

Narrator: Colin Fluxman
Length: 6 hrs and 40 mins
Available on Audible
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Italian History

Summary

If you want to discover the captivating history of Italy and Rome, then pay attention... Two captivating manuscripts in one audiobook:  History of Italy: A Captivating Guide to Italian History, Starting from the First Settlements Through the Middle Ages to the Modern Period History of Rome: A Captivating Guide to Roman History, Starting from the Legend of Romulus and Remus Through the Roman Republic, Byzantium, Medieval Period, and Renaissance to Modern History Some of the topics covered in part one of this audiobook include: The Bronze Age in Italy and the Early Settlements Iron Age and Pre-Roman Italy Italy in the Roman Period Barbarian and Byzantine Italy The Kingdom of the Lombards and the Emergence of the Papal States Italy’s Place in the Holy Roman Empire Italy’s Renaissance The Modern History of Italy And much, much more! Some of the topics covered in part two of this audiobook include: The Founding of Rome: Myth and Reality The Kingdom of Rome The Roman Republic Social Wars and the End of the Roman Republic Pax Romana The Third and Early Fourth Centuries The Fall of the West; The East Thrives Rome in the Middle Ages The Renaissance Modern History of Rome  And much, much more! So, if you want to learn more about the history of Italy and Rome, get this audiobook now!

©2021 Captivating History (P)2021 Captivating History

Narrator: Jason Zenobia
Length: 10 hrs and 57 mins
Available on Audible
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The Greek World

3 ratings

Summary

The ancient Greeks, more than any other early culture, have given us the template for Western civilization, as seen in their superlative achievements in the fields of architecture, political theory, philosophy, science, and art - not the least of which are their inventions of democracy and drama. In these 24 compelling lectures, Professor Garland guides you in a richly illuminating exploration of what the ancient Greeks have given us, and why they’re still important to us today.    The course delves into the origins of Greek civilization, the great Classical and Hellenistic periods, and takes you through the succeeding epochs of the Roman and Byzantine eras to the Renaissance, culminating with Greece’s dramatic modern history.  You’ll discover the elements of Greek culture that have so deeply imprinted the west in examples such as:   The Phenomenon of Hellenism - Learn how Greek culture flowered during the Classical Age, then spread through Alexander’s conquests across the Mediterranean world;   Athenian Democracy - Grasp the features of democracy as it arose in Athens in the 5th century B.C.E. as a bold political experiment;   Religion and the Olympians - Explore the nature of Greek religious belief, and the panoply of gods and goddesses, from Zeus, Apollo, and Dionysus to Athena, Aphrodite, and Persephone;    Greek Drama, Literature, and Philosophy - Study the plays of Aeschylus, Euripides, Sophocles, and Aristophanes; the essence of Homer’s great epic poems; and the seminal ideas of philosophers Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle;  Sculpture, Painting, and Architecture - Survey the techniques and aesthetics of Greek sculpture; discover the superlative qualities of Greek vase painting; and study the elements of Greek architecture that have so deeply impacted Western architecture and art.   The Greek World: A Study of History and Culture offers you a multilevel immersion in Greek civilization, and an unforgettable view of the extraordinary power ancient Greece exerts over the Western imagination. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.

©2020 The Great Courses (P)2020 The Teaching Company, LLC

Length: 12 hrs and 44 mins
Available on Audible
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Magicians of the Gods

262 ratings

Summary

New archaeological evidence for a pre-historic civilisation updated with two substantial new chapters brimming with recent reporting of fresh scientific advances. Graham Hancock's multi-million best seller Fingerprints of the Gods remains an astonishing, deeply controversial, wide-ranging investigation of the mysteries of our past and the evidence for Earth's lost civilisation. Twenty years on, Hancock returns with a book filled with completely new, scientific and archaeological evidence, which has only recently come to light.... The evidence revealed in this book shows beyond reasonable doubt that an advanced civilisation that flourished during the Ice Age was destroyed in the global cataclysms between 12,800 and 11,600 years ago. Near the end of the last Ice Age 12,800 years ago, a giant comet that had entered the solar system from deep space thousands of years earlier, broke into multiple fragments. Some of these struck the Earth causing a global cataclysm on a scale unseen since the extinction of the dinosaurs. At least eight of the fragments hit the North American ice cap, while further fragments hit the northern European ice cap. The impacts, from comet fragments a mile wide approaching at more than 60,000 miles an hour, generated huge amounts of heat which instantly liquidised millions of square kilometres of ice, destabilising the Earth's crust and causing the global Deluge that is remembered in myths all around the world. A second series of impacts, equally devastating, causing further cataclysmic flooding, occurred 11,600 years ago, the exact date that Plato gives for the destruction and submergence of Atlantis. But there were survivors - known to later cultures by names such as 'the Sages', 'the Magicians', 'the Shining Ones', and 'the Mystery Teachers of Heaven'. They travelled the world in their great ships doing all in their power to keep the spark of civilisation burning. They settled at key locations - Gobekli Tepe in Turkey, Baalbek in the Lebanon, Giza in Egypt, ancient Sumer, Mexico, Peru and across the Pacific where a huge pyramid has recently been discovered in Indonesia. Everywhere they went these 'Magicians of the Gods' brought with them the memory of a time when mankind had fallen out of harmony with the universe and paid a heavy price. A memory and a warning to the future.... For the comet that wrought such destruction between 12,800 and 11,600 years may not be done with us yet. Astronomers believe that a 20-mile wide 'dark' fragment of the original giant comet remains hidden within its debris stream and threatens the Earth. An astronomical message encoded at Gobekli Tepe and in the Sphinx and the pyramids of Egypt, warns that the 'Great Return' will occur in our time.... 

©2015 Graham Hancock (P)2015 Hodder & Stoughton

Narrator: Graham Hancock
Length: 14 hrs and 54 mins
Available on Audible
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Ancient Rome: A Captivating Introduction to the Roman Republic, the Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire, and the Byzantine Empire

Summary

If you want to discover captivating stories of people and events of ancient Rome then keep reading.... The Roman civilization is probably the single most important civilization in the history of the planet. Its expansion defined Europe. Its constitution shaped societies from Russia in the east to the United States and Latin America in the west. Not even its conquerors were immune to the superior Roman culture.  In this new captivating history book, you’ll learn all you need to know about Roman institutions and politics. But our focus will be on the captivating stories and curious personalities of the Roman emperors, politicians, and generals - from Romulus, Caesar, Augustus, Trajan, and Hadrian to Constantine, Justinian, and Belisarius.   Equally important (and perhaps even more interesting) are the stories of influential women - mothers, wives, and lovers, from Cleopatra and Agrippina to Theodora and Zoe with the coal-black eyes - whose schemes often redirected the course of history.  Here are some of the topics covered in Ancient Rome: A Captivating Introduction to the Roman Republic, the Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire, and the Byzantine Empire:   The Seven Kings of Seven Hills: The Foundation of Rome and Its First Rulers The Early Republic The Punic Wars and Mediterranean Dominance: The Middle Republic Decay, Corruption, and Civil Wars: The Late Republic Gaius Julius Caesar, Crossing the Rubicon, and Death That Shook the City The Rise of First Roman Emperor Early Roman Empire: Princeps Augustus and Julio-Claudian Dynasty The Flavian Dynasty The Nerva-Antonine Dynasty Late Empire The Empire of Constantine Constantinian Dynasty Decline and Fall of the Western Roman Empire The Byzantine Millennium And much, much more! Listen to this audiobook now to learn more about ancient Rome!

©2018 Captivating History (P)2018 Captivating History

Narrator: Timothy Burke
Length: 3 hrs and 10 mins
Available on Audible
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From Jesus to Constantine: A History of Early Christianity

11 ratings

Summary

Step back to Christianity's first three centuries to see how it transitioned from the religion of Jesus to a religion about Jesus. How did a single group from among many win the struggle for dominance to establish the beliefs central to the faith, rewrite the history of Christianity's internal conflicts, and produce a canon of sacred texts – the New Testament – that supported its own views? These 24 lectures provide a fresh and provocative perspective on how a movement of perhaps only 20 lower-class followers of a Jewish apocalyptic preacher crucified as an enemy of the state grew to include nearly four million adherents in only 300 years. Professor Ehrman looks at the faith's beginnings, starting with the historical Jesus, Jewish-Christian relations, the way Paul and other Christians spread the new faith, hostility to the Christian mission, internal struggles within the faith, and the formation of traditional Christianity as we know it today. Christianity argued its ancient roots by retaining the Jewish scriptures and arguing that it was, in fact, the fulfillment of what those scriptures had promised. Throughout these lectures, Professor Ehrman challenges old misconceptions and offers fresh perspectives on aspects of Christianity and its roots that many of us might have thought we already understood. By offering you a scholar's perspective on the origins of what Professor Ehrman describes as the most important institution in Western civilization, this engaging course will increase your understanding of Christianity today. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2004 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2004 The Great Courses

Narrator: Bart D. Ehrman
Length: 12 hrs and 21 mins
Available on Audible
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The Ancient History of the Near East

Summary

Henry Reginald Holland Hall (1873-1930) was an English Egyptologist and historian. His in-depth study of the ancient near east examines the region’s civilizations and history, starting with the early Bronze age civilizations such as that of the Minoans on Crete. He explores the history of ancient Egypt in detail, and the civilizations of Mesopotamia and Iran, like Babylonia, Assyria and Persia.  In addition, Hall compares the archaeological evidence from Syria, Palestine and Israel with the writings of the Old Testament to provide a fascinating account of the ancient Phoenicians, Philistines, Hebrews and Aramaeans.

Public Domain (P)2020 Museum Audiobooks

Narrator: Andrea Giordani
Length: 22 hrs and 29 mins
Available on Audible
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Rome

Summary

Novelist and historian Matthew Kneale, a longtime resident of Rome, tells the story of the Eternal City - from the early Roman Republic through the Renaissance and the Reformation to Mussolini and the German occupation in World War Two - through pivotal moments that defined its history. Rome, the Eternal City. It is a hugely popular tourist destination with a rich history, famed for such sites as the Colosseum, the Forum, the Pantheon, St. Peter’s, and the Vatican. In no other city is history as present as it is in Rome. Today visitors can stand on bridges that Julius Caesar and Cicero crossed; walk around temples in the footsteps of emperors; visit churches from the earliest days of Christianity. This is all the more remarkable considering what the city has endured over the centuries. It has been ravaged by fires, floods, earthquakes, and - most of all - by roving armies. These have invaded repeatedly, from ancient times to as recently as 1943. Many times Romans have shrugged off catastrophe and remade their city anew. Matthew Kneale uses seven of these crisis moments to create a powerful and captivating account of Rome’s extraordinary history. He paints portraits of the city before each assault, describing what it looked like, felt like, smelled like and how Romans, both rich and poor, lived their everyday lives. He shows how the attacks transformed Rome - sometimes for the better. With drama and humor he brings to life the city of Augustus, of Michelangelo and Bernini, of Garibaldi and Mussolini, and of popes both saintly and very worldly. He shows how Rome became the chaotic and wondrous place it is today. Rome: A History in Seven Sackings offers a unique look at a truly remarkable city. "Kneale's account is a masterpiece of pacing and suspense. Characters from the city's history spring to life in his hands." (The Sunday Times [London])

©2018 Matthew Kneale (P)2018 Simon & Schuster

Narrator: Neil Gardner
Length: 12 hrs and 41 mins
Available on Audible
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The Medieval World

60 ratings

Summary

Far from being a time of darkness, the Middle Ages was an essential period in the grand narrative of Western history. But what was it like to actually live in those extraordinary times? Now you can find out. These 36 lectures provide a different perspective on the society and culture of the Middle Ages - one that entrenches you in the daily human experience of living during this underappreciated era. Drawing on history, literature, the arts, technology, and science, these lectures will deepen the way you understand not only the Middle Ages but everything that came afterward: From the Renaissance, to the Enlightenment, to your own world. Filled with amazing insights, this series brings you closer than ever before to life as it was lived and felt. You'll meet the likes of William Caxton, England's first printer who not only printed and distributed a variety of works but also often had to translate them himself; learn about Hugh of Payns and the role of his Knights Templar - organized for the protection of pilgrims traveling to Jerusalem - in the creation of the first modern bank; see how communities dealt with marriage in a time when the church had not yet drawn this institution into its orbit; and much more. Rich with information and period detail (including revealing examples of medieval literature from the English, French, Norse, Icelandic, and Italian worlds), these lectures will dramatically increase your understanding of how lives in the Middle Ages were really lived. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2009 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2009 The Great Courses

Length: 18 hrs and 16 mins
Available on Audible
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Maya to Aztec: Ancient Mesoamerica Revealed

60 ratings

Summary

Centuries ago, Spanish conquistadors searching for gold and new lands encountered a group of independent city-states in Mesoamerica. Sophisticated beyond the Spaniards' wildest imaginings, these people were the Aztecs, the Maya, and related cultures that shared common traditions of religion, government, the arts, engineering, and trade. In many ways more advanced than European nations, these societies equaled the world's greatest civilizations of their time. Immerse yourself in this epic story with 48 exhilarating half-hour lectures that cover the scope of Mesoamerican history and culture. You'll focus mainly on the Maya, who have been in Mesoamerica for thousands of years, and the Aztecs, who mysteriously appeared late and rose swiftly to power. The Aztecs fell from power just as precipitously; their empire controlled the region for less than a century, until the arrival of the Spanish in the early 1500s. Why were the Aztecs so quickly defeated by the conquistadors, while the Maya resisted the invaders for generations? Although the Spanish eventually conquered all of Mesoamerica, much remains of the original cultures. Beautiful artifacts fill museums. Impressive ruins dot the landscape. And millions of descendants of ancient Mesoamericans still live in their ancestral homes, speaking native languages and practicing time-honored traditions. The countries from Mexico to Costa Rica include more than a dozen UNESCO World Heritage Sites related to the pre-Columbian period, plus scores of other ancient sites that are equally worth a visit. This course is the ideal way to plan an itinerary, prepare for a tour, or simply sit back and enjoy a thrilling virtual voyage. You will be surprised at the number of sites to explore - many more than you could possibly see in months of travel. Your guide is Professor Barnhart, a noted archaeologist whose exploits include the discovery of a lost Maya city. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your My Library section along with the audio.

©2015 The Great Courses (P)2015 The Teaching Company, LLC

Narrator: Edwin Barnhart
Length: 23 hrs and 15 mins
Available on Audible
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The Fall and Rise of China

143 ratings

Summary

How can we account for China’s momentous - and almost wholly unanticipated - global rise? And what does it mean, for us in the West and for humanity’s future? Speaking to these vital and fascinating questions, these 48 penetrating lectures by Professor Baum bring to vivid life the human struggles, the titanic political upheavals, and the spectacular speed of China’s modern rebirth. Offering multilevel insight into one of the most astounding real-life dramas of modern history, the lectures weave together the richly diverse developments and sociopolitical currents that created the China you now read about in the headlines. You’ll get a detailed understanding of all the core events in China’s century of stunning change, including the collapse of the Qing dynasty, the Republican era and civil wars, the "Great Leap Forward", the Cultural Revolution, and the post-Mao economic "miracle". Throughout, Professor Baum reveals highly unusual details that enrich the cinematic sweep of the story. For example, you’ll learn about the Christian warlord who baptized his troops with a fire hose, the strange kidnapping of Chiang K’ai-shek, and Professor Baum’s own smuggling of top-secret documents out of Taiwan. A core strength of these lectures is that they make sense of the dramatic events of the story by getting deeply at what underlay them, culturally, socially, and historically - leaving you with a nuanced knowledge of the forces moving China’s modern emergence. Bringing alive the passionate reinvention of China with deep discernment and humanity, they portray the confounding, majestic, heart-rending, and visionary story of a modern giant. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2010 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2010 The Great Courses

Narrator: Richard Baum
Length: 24 hrs and 8 mins
Available on Audible
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The Rise of Rome

106 ratings

Summary

The Roman Republic is one of the most breathtaking civilizations in world history. Between roughly 500 BCE to the turn of the millennium, a modest city-state developed an innovative system of government and expanded into far-flung territories across Europe, Northern Africa, and the Middle East. This powerful civilization inspired America's founding fathers, gifted us a blueprint for amazing engineering innovations, left a vital trove of myths, and has inspired the human imagination for 2,000 years. How did Rome become so powerful? This mystery has vexed historians from the ancient Greek writer Polybius to 21st century scholars. Today, removed as we are from the Roman Republic, historians also wonder what it was like to be a Roman citizen in that amazing era. Beyond the familiar names of Romulus, Caesar, Octavian, Brutus, and Mark Antony, what was life like for the ordinary people? And what did the conquered peoples think of this world power? PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2018 The Teaching Company, LLC; 2018 The Great Courses

Length: 12 hrs and 16 mins
Available on Audible
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How Rome Fell

18 ratings

Summary

In AD 200, the Roman Empire seemed unassailable, its vast territory accounting for most of the known world. By the end of the fifth century, Roman rule had vanished in Western Europe and much of northern Africa, and only a shrunken Eastern Empire remained. This was a period of remarkable personalities, from the philosopher-emperor Marcus Aurelius to emperors like Diocletian, who portrayed themselves as tough, even brutal, soldiers. It was a time of revolutionary ideas, especially in religion, as Christianity went from persecuted sect to the religion of state and emperors. Ultimately, this is the story of how an empire without a serious rival rotted from within, its rulers and institutions putting short-term ambition and personal survival over the greater good of the state.

©2009 Adrian Goldsworthy (P)2014 Tantor

Narrator: Derek Perkins
Length: 18 hrs and 27 mins
Available on Audible
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Ancient Africa

1 rating

Summary

If you want to discover the captivating history of ancient Africa, then pay attention... Africa is the continent where the first humans were born. They explored the vast land and produced the first tools. And although we migrated from that continent, we never completely abandoned it. From the beginning of time, humans lived and worked in Africa, leaving evidence of their existence in the sands of the Sahara Desert and the valleys of the great rivers, such as the Nile and the Niger. Some of the earliest great civilizations were born there, and they give us an insight into the smaller kingdoms of ancient Africa. As the home of the many pharaohs, Queen Sheba, Hannibal Barca, and Mansa Musa, Africa deserves our full attention. It has stories to tell us and cultural riches to share with us. Africa is where paganism, Christianity, and Islam left their trails and created a cultural fusion that is unique to the continent. Some modern countries are popular tourist destinations, while others are war-torn lands still unable to industrialize. This polarity of Africa can be traced to ancient times, and the world-shaping events that occurred here need to be studied and understood.  In Ancient Africa: A Captivating Guide to Ancient African Civilizations, Such as the Kingdom of Kush, the Land of Punt, Carthage, the Kingdom of Aksum, and the Mali Empire with Its Timbuktu, you will discover chapters such as: The Kingdom of Kush The Land of Punt Carthage The Kingdom of Aksum The Ghana Empire The Mali Empire And much, much more! So, if you want to learn more about ancient Africa, scroll up and click the "add to cart" button!

©2020 Captivating History (P)2020 Captivating History

Narrator: Jason Zenobia
Length: 4 hrs and 2 mins
Available on Audible
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Ancient Gaul: The History and Legacy of the Gauls and the Region in Antiquity

Summary

The Roman Republic’s development from a city state into a world power that controlled large swathes of modern Italy, Gaul, and Spain, as well as other parts of Europe is seen by many as being the direct result of Roman fear of the “Celtic Threat.” The sacking of Rome by the Gauls in 386 BC became indelibly imprinted into the Roman psyche, and with this fear came a desire to put as much distance as possible between the city of Rome and any potential enemy. The result was the gradual acquisition of buffer zones that became provinces of an empire that grew without any particular thought out or deliberate strategy of expansion.  The Gallic Wars, the series of campaigns waged by Julius Caesar on behalf of the Roman Senate between 58-50 BC, were among the defining conflicts of the Roman era. Not only was the expansion of the Republic’s domains unprecedented (especially when considering it was undertaken under the auspices of a single general), it had a profound cultural impact on Rome itself as well. The Roman Republic, so dynamic in the wake of the destruction of their ancient enemy, Carthage, had recently suffered a series of dramatic upheavals; from the great slave rebellion of Spartacus to the brutal and bloody struggle for power of Marius and Sulla. Rome had been shaken to its very core, and a victory was essential both to replenish the dwindling national coffers and to instill in the people a sense of civic pride and a certainty in the supremacy of the Republic.  Quite simply, in terms of scale, the Gallic Wars were unmatched by anything the Roman Republic had witnessed since the Punic Wars. By the end of the campaigns, ancient historians estimated that more than a million people had died, and still more were displaced or enslaved. Even by the more conservative estimates of modern historians, a casualty count in the hundreds of thousands appears possible. Either way, the war was a cataclysm, involving tens of thousands of combatants, and it also marked the greatest displays of skill by one of the greatest battlefield generals history has ever known.  Caesar’s successful campaigns in Gaul have become the stuff of military legend on their merits, but it helped that he had the foresight to document them himself. Caesar himself wrote a famous firsthand account of the Gallic Wars, apparently from notes he had kept during the campaigns, and he wrote Commentarii de Bello Gallico (Commentaries on the Gallic War) in the third person. Caesar’s account described the campaigning and the battles, all as part of a propaganda campaign to win the approval of the Roman people. As a result, he left out inconvenient facts, including how much of a fortune he made plundering, but the work still remains popular today, and it is still used to teach Latin.  Ancient Gaul: The History and Legacy of the Gauls and the Region in Antiquity looks at the most famous events involving Gaul and the ancient world, from the Gauls’ sack of Rome to Caesar’s famous conquest.

©2018 Charles River Editors (P)2018 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Colin Fluxman
Length: 2 hrs and 36 mins
Available on Audible
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Pompeii: A History of the City and the Eruption of Mount Vesuvius

Summary

Gone in an instant. Pompeii was one of the most advanced cities of its time; it had a complex water system, gymnasium, and amphitheater. Despite its advancements, there was one thing it wasn't ready for: Mount Vesuvius - the volcano that led to its ultimate doom. The 79 AD eruption of Mount Vesuvius was one of the worst disasters in all of European history. In a near instant, over 15,000 people were dead and a city was completely destroyed. This audiobook looks at the rise, fall, and rediscovery of the great city of Pompeii.

©2013 Golgotha Press, Inc. (P)2021 Golgotha Press, Inc.

Narrator: Jason Sullivan
Author: Fergus Mason
Length: 2 hrs and 3 mins
Available on Audible
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Persian Fire

9 ratings

Summary

In 480 BC, Xerxes, the King of Persia, led an invasion of mainland Greece. Its success should have been a formality. For 70 years, victory - rapid, spectacular victory - had seemed the birthright of the Persian Empire. In the space of a single generation, they had swept across the Near East, shattering ancient kingdoms, storming famous cities, putting together an empire which stretched from India to the shores of the Aegean. As a result of those conquests, Xerxes ruled as the most powerful man on the planet. Yet somehow, astonishingly, against the largest expeditionary force ever assembled, the Greeks of the mainland managed to hold out. The Persians were turned back. Greece remained free. Had the Greeks been defeated at Salamis, not only would the West have lost its first struggle for independence and survival, but it is unlikely that there would ever have been such an entity as the West at all. Tom Holland's brilliant book describes the very first 'clash of Empires' between East and West. Once again he has found extraordinary parallels between the ancient world and our own. There is no competing popular book describing these events.

©2005 Tom Holland (P)2019 Hachette Audio UK

Author: Tom Holland
Length: 15 hrs and 48 mins
Available on Audible
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The Joy of Ancient History

2 ratings

Summary

For years, The Great Courses has taken lifelong learners on stirring explorations of our ancient roots; ones that bring you face to face with what history means, and how we use it to understand both the past and the present. So where's the best place to start? Right here with this eclectic and insightful collection of 36 lectures curated from our most popular ancient history courses. Guided by some of our most highly rated and award-winning professors - including archaeologists, classicists, military historians, and religion scholars - you'll hopscotch around the world and across time to experience the fascinating variety of what ancient history has to offer. Because the subject itself spans roughly five millennia, this "best of" collection does all the legwork for you, selecting captivating lectures that offer both introductions to and deep dives into some of the most prominent ancient civilizations, including the ancient Greeks, Romans, and Egyptians. This collection also takes you far afield into the dramatic stories of cultures in Europe, the Middle East, South America, India, China, and other parts of the world. Listening to some of our brightest academic minds talk about the ancient world, you'll truly understand why we're still captivated by people and events from thousands of years ago, and why they still have much to tell us about where we are. And where we're headed.

©2014 The Great Courses (P)2014 The Teaching Company, LLC

Available on Audible
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Roman History, Volume 1

1 rating

Summary

Dio Cassius was a Roman statesman and historian of Greek origin. He published 80 volumes of history on ancient Rome, beginning with the arrival of Aeneas in Italy. The volumes documented the subsequent founding of Rome (753 BC), the formation of the republic (509 BC), and the creation of the empire (31 BC). The history continues until AD 229. Written in ancient Greek over a period of 22 years, Dio's work covers approximately 1,000 years of history. Many of his 80 books have survived intact or as fragments, providing modern scholars with a unique perspective on Roman history, particularly the period of the empire from Trajan through Alexander Severus. The first 36 books are fragmentary to one extent or another, especially books 30 through 35. Beginning with book 36, Dio enters into a very detailed history that commences with the rivalry of Sulla and Marius. It then follows the career of Julius Caesar. This volume ends with book 49 and the increasing friction between Mark Antony and Octavian. Please note that book three is no longer extant.

Public Domain (P)2017 Audio Connoisseur

Author: Dio Cassius
Length: 29 hrs and 51 mins
Available on Audible
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Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic Age

4 ratings

Summary

This series of 24 lectures examines a crucial period in the history of the ancient world, the age ushered in by the extraordinary conquests of Alexander the Great. In all the annals of the ancient world, few stories are more gripping than those from this era. In the opening lectures, you'll explore the enigma of Alexander, son of a brilliant father, yet always at odds with the man whom he succeeded. You'll trace his early campaigns against the Persians and follow him to Egypt, where he was acclaimed as the son of god. You'll then look at his career after this and find in him a blend of greatness and madness as he strove to replace the Persian empire of the Achaemenid dynasty with a new, mixed ruling class of Macedonians and Persians. From there, you'll delve into the catastrophic period after Alexander's death in 323 B.C., which ushered in a period of catastrophic change as ambitious warlords carved up Alexander's realm into their own separate empires. You'll learn about each of the three kingdoms that resulted: Ptolemaic Egypt, Seleucid Syria, and the Attalid Empire in Asia Minor. Just as important to these lectures are the in-depth discussions of the bounties of Hellenistic culture, which contributed landmark ideas in everything from philosophy (which became more academic), art and architecture (with its excessive, naked emotions), and religion (especially the growing popularity of cult movements). Taken all together, these lectures are an engrossing and riveting journey into ancient history-and the life and times of the man who left an indelible mark on everything that would come after.

©2000 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2000 The Great Courses

Length: 12 hrs and 13 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Rome: The History of the Roman Empire and Its Emperors

Rome: The History of the Roman Empire and Its Emperors

Summary

Discover the story of the greatest empire in history. Rome features two books: The Roman Empire and Augustus Caesar. Peter Wings travels back into the age of Caesar and takes you with him.  Listen to stories of war and power that changed forever the future of years to come. From the conquest of the Mediterranean to the destruction of the Roman Empire by barbarian invaders, we will cover every single aspect in the Roman history. Prepare for a time travel. Prepare to meet Pompey, Julius Caesar, Augustus, Nero, Constantine and many personalities who changed the way we live. Augustus Caesar narrates the story of the single man who had the most influence over the story of our world. Caesar was a strong personality. He's intriguing, intelligent, strategic, smart and ambitious. His life is full of drama, gambles, risks and success. A true leader of men. In this audiobook, we will discover the life of Caesar Augustus, his major accomplishments, and the man behind the emperor. This is a truly unique biography.

©2020 Peter Wings (P)2020 Peter Wings

Narrator: Peter Prova
Author: Peter Wings
Length: 12 hrs and 18 mins
Available on Audible
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Dynasty

14 ratings

Summary

Dynasty tells the story of Rome's first dynasty of emperors, from its establishment by Augustus Caesar in the last decades of the first century BC to its final, florid extinction less than a century later. The line of autocrats known to historians as the 'Julio-Claudians' remains to this day a byword for depravity. The brilliance of its allure and the blood-steeped shadows cast by its crimes still haunt the public imagination. When people think of imperial Rome, it is the cities of Tiberius and Caligula, of Claudius and Nero that are most likely to come into their minds. Dynasty Tom Holland provides not only a compelling history of this fascinating family but a portrait of the entire Roman world.

©2015 Tom Holland (P)2015 Hachette Audio

Narrator: Mark Meadows
Author: Tom Holland
Length: 17 hrs and 45 mins
Available on Audible
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The Dark Ages: 476-918

3 ratings

Summary

The Dark Ages is the story of the birth of Western civilization. It was a harrowing crucible of war, destruction, and faith. For over 100 years, Charles Oman's famous history has remained one of the finest sources for the study of this period. Covering a period of 500 years and an area stretching from Northern Germany to Egypt, this is the definitive history that will alter your conceptions of a period of history that gave birth to the civilization we live in today. Table of contents: Chapter 1: Odoacer and Theodoric, 476-493 Chapter 2: Theodoric King of Italy, 493-526 Chapter 3: The Emperors at Constantinople, 476-527 Chapter 4: Chlodovech and the Franks in Gaul, 481-511 Chapter 5: Justinian and His Wars, 528-540 Chapter 6: Justinian (Continued), 540-565 Chapter 7: The Earlier Frankish Kings and Their Organisation of Gaul, 511-561 Chapter 8: The Visigoths in Spain, 531-603 Chapter 9: The Successors of Justinian, 565-610 Chapter 10: Decline and Decay of the Merovingians, 561-656 Chapter 11: The Lombards in Italy and the Rise of the Papacy, 568-653 Chapter 12: Heraclius and Muhammed, 610-641 Chapter 13: The Decline and Fall of the Visigoths, 603-711 Chapter 14: The Contest of the Eastern Empire and the Caliphate, 641-717 Chapter 15: The History of the Great Mayors of the Palace, 656-720 Chapter 16: The Lombards and the Papacy, 653-743 Chapter 17: Charles Martel and His Wars, 720-741 Chapter 18: The Iconoclast Emperors: State of the Eastern Empire in the Eighth Century, 717-802 Chapter 19: Pippin the Short: Wars of the Franks and Lombards, 741-768 Chapter 20: Charles the Great: Early Years, 768-785...Conquest of Lombardy and Saxony Chapter 21: The Later Wars and Conquests of Charles the Great, 785-814 Chapter 22: Charles the Great and the Empire Chapter 23: Louis the Pious, 814-840 Chapter 24: Disruption of the Frankish Empire: The Coming of the Vikings, 840-855 Chapter 25: The Darkest Hour, 855-887: From the Death of Lothair I to the Deposition of Charles the Fat Chapter 26: Italy and Sicily in the Ninth Century, 827-924 Chapter 27: Germany, 888-918 Chapter 28: The Eastern Empire in the Ninth Century, 802-912 Chapter 29: The End of the Ninth Century in Western Europe: Conclusion

Public Domain (P)2016 Audio Connoisseur

Author: Charles Oman
Length: 19 hrs and 30 mins
Available on Audible
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Ravenna

1 rating

Summary

This riveting audiobook narrated by Phyllida Nash traces the history of the city that led the West out of the ruins of the Roman Empire At the end of the fourth century, as the power of Rome faded and Constantinople became the seat of empire, a new capital city was rising in the West. Here, in Ravenna on the coast of Italy, Arian Goths and Catholic Romans competed to produce an unrivaled concentration of buildings and astonishing mosaics. For three centuries, the city attracted scholars, lawyers, craftsmen, and religious luminaries, becoming a true cultural and political capital. Bringing this extraordinary history marvelously to life, Judith Herrin rewrites the history of East and West in the Mediterranean world before the rise of Islam and shows how, thanks to Byzantine influence, Ravenna played a crucial role in the development of medieval Christendom.  Drawing on deep, original research, Herrin tells the personal stories of Ravenna while setting them in a sweeping synthesis of Mediterranean and Christian history. She narrates the lives of the Empress Galla Placidia and the Gothic king Theoderic and describes the achievements of an amazing cosmographer and a doctor who revived Greek medical knowledge in Italy, demolishing the idea that the West just descended into the medieval "Dark Ages."  Based on the latest archaeological findings, this monumental book provides a bold new interpretation of Ravenna's lasting influence on the culture of Europe and the West.

©2020 Judith Herrin (P)2020 Princeton University Press

Narrator: Phyllida Nash
Length: 19 hrs and 3 mins
Available on Audible
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Thebes

1 rating

Summary

The riveting, de?nitive account of the ancient Greek city of Thebes, by the acclaimed author of The Spartans. Among the extensive writing available about the history of ancient Greece, there is precious little about the city-state of Thebes. At one point the most powerful city in ancient Greece, Thebes has been long overshadowed by its better-known rivals, Athens and Sparta. In Thebes: The Forgotten City of Ancient Greece, acclaimed classicist and historian Paul Cartledge brings the city vividly to life and argues that it is central to our understanding of the ancient Greeks' achievements - whether politically or culturally - and thus to the wider politico-cultural traditions of western Europe, the Americas, and indeed the world. From its role as an ancient political power, to its destruction at the hands of Alexander the Great as punishment for a failed revolt, to its eventual restoration by Alexander's successor, Cartledge deftly chronicles the rise and fall of the ancient city. He recounts the history with deep clarity and mastery for the subject and makes clear both the di?erences and the interconnections between the Thebes of myth and the Thebes of history. Written in clear prose and illustrated with images, Thebes is a gripping listen for students of ancient history and those looking to experience the real city behind the myths of Cadmus, Hercules, and Oedipus.

©2020 Paul Cartledge (P)2020 Blackstone Publishing

Narrator: David Timson
Length: 10 hrs and 6 mins
Available on Audible
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The Fall of Rome

2 ratings

Summary

Was the fall of Rome a great catastrophe that cast the West into darkness for centuries to come? Or, as scholars argue today, was there no crisis at all, but simply a peaceful blending of barbarians into Roman culture, an essentially positive transformation? In The Fall of Rome, eminent historian Bryan Ward-Perkins argues that the "peaceful" theory of Rome's "transformation" is badly in error. Indeed, he sees the fall of Rome as a time of horror and dislocation that destroyed a great civilization, throwing the inhabitants of the West back to a standard of living typical of prehistoric times. Attacking contemporary theories with relish and making use of modern archaeological evidence, he looks at both the wider explanations for the disintegration of the Roman world and also the consequences for the lives of everyday Romans. The book recaptures the drama and violence of the last days of the Roman world and reminds us of the very real terrors of barbarian occupation. Equally important, Ward-Perkins contends that a key problem with the new way of looking at the end of the ancient world is that all difficulty and awkwardness is smoothed out into a steady and positive transformation of society. Nothing ever goes badly wrong in this vision of the past. The evidence shows otherwise.

©2005 Bryan Ward-Perkins (P)2019 Tantor

Narrator: Roger Clark
Length: 7 hrs and 33 mins
Available on Audible
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Sumerian Mythology

Summary

Sumerian history and mythology have been shrouded in mystery for thousands of years. These tales of the world's very first civilization is now being exposed to the light of day, fascinating men and women around the world. The stories of Enlil, Enkidu, and Gilgamesh are finding new audiences. People are interested in learning about a world where the people felt and experienced thoughts very differently from how we do today.  Sumerian mythology was so powerful that some of their gods found their way into different cultures. The most famous example of this being Aphrodite who began life as the Sumerian goddess Inanna. In Sumerian Mythology: Fascinating Sumerian History and Mesopotamian Empire and Myths, you will be exposed to the riveting tales of gods and heroes who formed the canon of the Sumerian religion. Sumerian civilization has become an intrinsic part of how we live today, even if most of us are unaware of it. The way that we measure time, observe the stars, and even plant and grow crops has a lot to do with the advancements made by the Sumerians, more than 6000 years ago. And heroes like Gilgamesh have helped define what it means to be a hero today. They were men who became gods, earning their place in immortality in more ways than one. The Sumerians used their stories as a way to instruct others about how they lived and even to help themselves understand their world.  In this audiobook, you will learn the formative tales of gods and heroes to help you understand who the Sumerians were and why they were important. Sumerian Mythology: Fascinating Sumerian History and Mesopotamian Empire and Myths explores the tales of gods and heroes in a concise, easy-to-listen fashion.  These tales of heroes and gods were deeply important to the Mesopotamian people and learning about them is the only way to understand the kind of world they lived in and how it was different from our own. It was a world of birds with the faces of lions, gods with the wings of birds, and seductive goddesses who symbolically married the kings of the various city-states. The Sumerians told many tales of gods like Inanna, An, Ashur, and Enlil, tales that helped the civilizations of Mesopotamia endure for nearly 4000 years. Indeed, European travelers to the Orient in the 18th century discovered that there were still districts where the goddess Inanna (more than 5000 years old then) was still worshiped in secret. The world of the Sumerians was unlike our own. The people at the heart of Sumerian civilization - living in modern-day Iraq, Kuwait, Turkey, and other places - were part of a culture so far removed from the way that we think and perceive today as to be almost unrecognizable. Sumerian Mythology: Fascinating Sumerian History and Mesopotamian Empire and Myths gives you the binoculars to view their world. It was a world of great empires: the Akkadian, Hurrian, Assyrian, and Babylonian. It was a world of legendary wealth and beauty. You will understand this world by gaining a summary of the major historical events and an in-depth exposure to the gods. In Sumerian Mythology: Fascinating Sumerian History and Mesopotamian Empire and Myths, you will learn all there is to know about Sumerian myth and history. You will learn about the Gilgamesh and Enkidu, the Anzu bird, who the major gods and goddesses were, who the important heroes were, and how Sumerian society left a legacy that continues with us today. Poets and historians recorded Mesopotamian tales on cuneiform tablets, but we have made the deciphering work easy for you. Buy now to embark on an exciting journey through the world of Sumerian myth and history!

©2019 Neil Matt Hamilton (P)2019 Neil Matt Hamilton

Narrator: Robin Nixon
Length: 3 hrs and 33 mins
Available on Audible
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The Dynastic Tablets and Chronicles of the Babylonians

Summary

Sound interesting? The historians thinks so too! Listen to The Dynastic Tablets and Chronicles of the Babylonians and learn about ancient history.     Museum Audiobooks strives to present audiobook versions of authentic, unabridged historical texts from prior eras which contain a variety of points of view. The texts do not represent the views or opinions of Museum Audiobooks, and in certain cases may contain perspectives or language that is objectionable to the modern listener.

Public Domain (P)2019 Museum Audiobooks

Narrator: Teagan McKenzie
Author: A.H. Sayce
Length: 51 mins
Available on Audible
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The Life of Greece

18 ratings

Summary

The second volume of Will Durant's Pulitzer Prize - winning series The Story of Civilization. Volume 2 chronicles the history of ancient Greek civilization. Here Durant tells the whole story of Greece from the days of Crete's vast Aegean empire to the final extirpation of the last remnants of Greek liberty, crushed under the heel of an implacably forward-marching Rome. The dry minutiae of battles and sieges, of tortuous statecraft of tyrant and king, get minor emphasis in what is preeminently a vivid recreation of Greek culture, brought to the listener through the medium of supple, vigorous prose. In this masterful work, listeners will learn about: The siege of Troy The great city-states of Athens and Sparta The heroes of Homer's epics The gods and lesser deities of Mount Olympus The teachings of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle The empire of Alexander the Great

©1966 Will Durant (P)2013 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

Narrator: Stefan Rudnicki
Author: Will Durant
Length: 32 hrs and 36 mins
Available on Audible
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The Sumerians

3 ratings

Summary

These people, the Sumerians, influenced not only all the other civilizations that arose in Mesopotamia but virtually every other human society that followed. Without the Sumerians, the world today would be a very different place. However, although we know a great deal about these people, there are fundamental mysteries about the Sumerians that have still not been solved by historians or archaeologists. For example, the Sumerians seemed to appear in Mesopotamia with a complex and developed society and skills and technologies that no other culture possessed, yet there is no agreement where they came from.  They created a complex language, but no one knows what it sounded like. There are striking examples of similarities between the art of the civilization of Sumer and the art of other ancient civilizations, yet we know that these cultures had no contact with each other. The Sumerians were able to observe and record astronomical and celestial phenomena in very advanced ways that are still not understood. In this audiobook you will learn about: Sumerian culture Sumerian inventions How long they were around What they looked like Fascinating insight into their everyday life

©2019 Innovative History (P)2019 Innovative History

Narrator: Cheryl May
Length: 3 hrs and 34 mins
Available on Audible
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A Brief History of the Anglo-Saxons

5 ratings

Summary

Starting AD 400 (around the time of their invasion of England) and running through to the 1100s (the 'Aftermath'), historian Geoffrey Hindley shows the Anglo-Saxons as formative in the history not only of England but also of Europe. The society inspired by the warrior world of the Old English poem Beowulf saw England become the world's first nation state and Europe's first country to conduct affairs in its own language, and Bede and Boniface of Wessex establish the dating convention we still use today. Including all the latest research, this is a fascinating assessment of a vital historical period. About the author: Geoffrey Hindley is an acclaimed Medievalist. His many books include The Shaping of Europe, Saladin: a Biography, The Book of Magna Carta, and A Brief History of the Crusades.

©2013 Geoffrey Hindley (P)2013 Audible Ltd

Narrator: Eleanor David
Length: 13 hrs and 3 mins
Available on Audible
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A New History of Life

7 ratings

Summary

The story of our world and the different living things that have populated it is an amazing epic with millions of species, exotic settings, planet-wide cataclysms, and surprising plot twists.  These 36 lectures tell the all-embracing story of life on Earth - its origins, extinctions, and evolutions - in a manner that assumes no background in science. At half an hour per lecture, you’ll cover the entire 4.54-billion-year history of Earth in 18 hours, averaging 70,000 years per second!  Professor Sutherland notes that if the story of Earth is compared to the height of the Washington Monument, then all of human history is the thickness of a sheet of paper balanced at the top. He devotes most of these lectures to the incredible happenings beneath that piece of paper, including stirring episodes such as Earth’s “snowball” phase, which should have been permanent according to some theories; the Cambrian explosion, after which life’s complexity soared in an explosion of genetic diversification; and the age of giant insects, where dragonflies had 30-inch wingspans and cockroaches reached 20 inches in length. By the time you reach the origin of humans in Lecture 35, you’ll appreciate our species in the widest possible context. Why does the Earth have continents? What causes periodic mass extinctions? How did animals move from water to land? What are the oldest fossils? Experience the thrill of scientists searching for answers to questions such as these.  PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.  

©2013 The Great Courses (P)2013 The Teaching Company, LLC

Length: 17 hrs and 46 mins
Available on Audible
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Qatna

Summary

The Early Bronze Age in the Near East (c. 3300 - 2100 BCE) was an era of significant cultural, political, and scientific development. At the same time, city-states became empires, gaining hegemony over the region, and then collapsed, sending Mesopotamia and the Levant into political chaos. The Sumerians were the dominant ethnic group during the first part of the Early Bronze Age Mesopotamia, and the Semitic Akkadians followed them, with the language of the latter became the lingua franca of the Near East for more than a millennium. However, as the Early Bronze Age transitioned into the Middle Bronze Age (c. 2100-1550 BCE), new ethnic groups came to prominence that would once more change the region’s political composition. These groups ushered in a new era where the Near East’s cultural and economic focus shifted from southern Mesopotamia to central and northern Mesopotamia and the Levant. The primary ethnic group that led this transition was the Amorites, who were originally a collection of nomadic Semitic tribes from the deserts of Arabia. When the Amorites began steadily infiltrating the cities and states of Mesopotamia and Syria around 2000 BCE, they brought a new way of conducting geopolitics in the region while adopting many centuries-old Mesopotamian and Levantine traditions regarding religion literacy and other aspects of culture. The legendary Hammurabi (r. circa 1792 - 1750 BCE) descended from the Amorites and most famously established the First Dynasty of Babylon, but other rulers named Hammurabi also reigned in Mari, Assyria, Yamhad, and Qatna. The Kingdom of Qatna, named for the primary city in the kingdom, was located on the other Amorite states’ geographical periphery in the northern Levant but was still a significant participant in the Near East’s geopolitical system during the Middle Bronze Age. Although researchers know little about the chronological details of the Qatna kings, a combination of sources from Mari, Egypt, and Qatna itself provide an image of the kingdom’s place in the world at the time, and it seems Qatna was every bit as powerful as its brother states in Mesopotamia. Thanks to its location, it was able to withstand the aggression of the more powerful states of Assyria and Babylon. The textual and archaeological evidence shows that Qatna was able to grow and prosper throughout the Middle Bronze Age. As the other Amorite powers collapsed at the onset of the Late Bronze Age (c. 1550 - 1200 BCE), it was able to stay politically relevant longer by playing the new powers against one another. Eventually, though, Qatna could not stop the march of history, or the armies of Egypt, Mitanni, and Hatti, and Qatna was ultimately leveled, only to be rediscovered over 3,000 years later in the 20th century. Qatna: The History and Legacy of the Ancient Syrian City During the Bronze Age chronicles the dramatic rise and fall of the Syrian city, and what life was like there; You will learn about Qatna like never before."

©2021 Charles River Editors (P)2021 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Colin Fluxman
Length: 1 hr and 13 mins
Available on Audible
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Living History: Experiencing Great Events of the Ancient and Medieval Worlds

12 ratings

Summary

Macedonia, 336 B.C.E. - King Philip II is murdered under mysterious circumstances amid a cloud of intrigue. Constantinople, 532 C.E. - The Byzantine Emperor Justinian nearly abandons the city to an angry mob until his wife, Theodora, persuades him to stay. France, 1095 C.E. - Pope Urban II gives a speech that inspires thousands of his subjects to embark on a crusade to Jerusalem. Time and again, moments shape history. We often examine history from a distant vantage, zooming in on a few kings and battles. But history is made up of individuals who were as alive in their time as we are today. Pausing on a few key individuals and magnifying specific moments in their lives allows us to experience history in a whole new way-as a vibrant story, full of life. Living History: Great Events of the Ancient and Medieval Worlds takes you back in time and throws a spotlight on two dozen turning points where the tide of history changes irrevocably. These 24 dramatic lectures examine key events from ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome to medieval Europe and Asia. Spanning thousands of years and three continents, this course illuminates fascinating historical dramas on the individual scale. More than covering great events that change the contours of history, Professor Garland takes you into the scene and allows you to hear what he terms the "heartbeat of history". Rather than merely reviewing the facts of events such as the Battle of Marathon, the arrest and trial of Jesus, and the coronation of Charlemagne, you'll engage with a variety of firsthand accounts and authentic primary and secondary sources to experience what it was like to live these events as they occurred. From reports by historians such as Herodotus and Livy to official scrolls and administrative records, these eyewitness sources and ancient documents take you back in time through the eyes of people who were there. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your My Library section along with the audio.

©2015 The Great Courses (P)2015 The Teaching Company, LLC

Narrator: Robert Garland
Length: 12 hrs and 39 mins
Available on Audible
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Human Prehistory and the First Civilizations

36 ratings

Summary

Where do we come from? How did our ancestors settle this planet? How did the great historic civilizations of the world develop? How does a past so shadowy that it has to be painstakingly reconstructed from fragmentary, largely unwritten records nonetheless make us who and what we are? These 36 lectures bring you the answers that the latest scientific and archaeological research and theorizing suggest about human origins, how populations developed, and the ways in which civilizations spread throughout the globe. It's a narrative of the story of human origins and the many ties that still bind us deeply to the world before writing. And it's a world tour of prehistory with profound links to who we are and how we live today. Woven through this narrative is a set of pervasive themes: emerging human biological and cultural diversity (as well as our remarkable similarities across surprising expanses of time and space); the impact of human adaptations to climatic and environmental change; and the importance of seeing prehistory not merely as a chronicle of archaeological sites and artifacts, but of people behaving with the extraordinary intellectual, spiritual, and emotional dynamism that distinguish the human. Among the corners of our mysterious past you'll explore: human prehistory from Australopithecus africanus through Homo habilis and Homo erectus; the beginnings of agriculture and animal domestication; theories behind the appearance of urban civilization and overall attributes of preindustrial civilizations; the maritime trading revolutions in Africa, India, and Southeast Asia; and much more. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2003 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2003 The Great Courses

Narrator: Brian M. Fagan
Length: 18 hrs and 10 mins
Available on Audible
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The World of Byzantium

23 ratings

Summary

Byzantium is too-often considered merely the "Eastern rump" of the old Roman Empire, a curious and even unsettling mix of the classical and medieval. Yet it was, according to Professor Harl, "without a doubt the greatest state in Christendom through much of the Middle Ages," and well worth our attention as a way to widen our perspective on everything from the decline of imperial Rome to the rise of the Renaissance. In a series of 24 tellingly detailed lectures, you'll learn how the Greek-speaking empire of Byzantium, or East Rome, occupied a crucial place in both time and space that began with Constantine the Great and endured for more than a millennium - a crucible where peoples, cultures, and ideas met and melded to create a world at once Eastern and Western, Greek and Latin, classical and Christian. And you'll be dazzled by the achievements of Byzantium's emperors, patriarchs, priests, monks, artists, architects, scholars, soldiers, and officials Preserving and extending the literary, intellectual, and aesthetic legacy of Classical and Hellenistic Greece Carrying forward path-breaking Roman accomplishments in law, politics, engineering, architecture, urban design, and military affairs Deepening Christian thought while spreading the faith to Russia and the rest of what would become the Orthodox world Developing Christian monastic institutions Shielding a comparatively weak and politically fragmented western Europe from the full force of eastern nomadic and Islamic invasions Fusing classical, Christian, and eastern influences Helping to shape the course of the Humanist revival and the Renaissance PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2001 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2001 The Great Courses

Narrator: Kenneth W. Harl
Length: 12 hrs and 11 mins
Available on Audible
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36 Revolutionary Figures of History

3 ratings

Summary

Alexander the Great, Jesus, Darwin, and Churchill are just a few of the many politicians, religious leaders, scientists, philosophers, authors, inventors, and generals who transformed our world in ways that still resonate today. Now, with this unique collection of 36 lectures from our extensive course catalog, meet the remarkable people without whom the world would never be the same. You'll examine the world that was dramatically reformed by a particular individual, or plunge into a defining moment in an individual's life, or learn how an individual went on to influence some of history's other great revolutionaries. Most importantly: you'll come away with a thorough understanding of why history is so indebted-for better or, in some instances, for worse-to these 36 epic figures, including Socrates, Queen Victoria, Abraham Lincoln, and Mohandas Gandhi. You'll also encounter figures that you may not have considered to be so revolutionary. It takes a great professor to help you understand what makes a single person change the world. To that end, we've assembled individual lectures from some of our most highly rated and beloved professors and instructors. Drawn from a range of academic fields (including military history, science, literature, religious studies, and philosophy), each professor lends his or her expert knowledge and teaching skills to making this an authoritative learning experience. Countless adventures await you with this carefully crafted look at titanic historical figures. If you have a friend who is new to The Great Courses, this collection makes for an accessible and rewarding first step into lifelong learning.

©2014 The Great Courses (P)2014 The Teaching Company, LLC

Length: 18 hrs and 36 mins
Available on Audible
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Great Pharaohs of Ancient Egypt

11 ratings

Summary

What is it about ancient Egypt that still captures our imaginations? How did it grow from a few villages along the Nile into the greatest power the world had ever seen? Explore these questions and more in these 12 entertaining lectures that tell the stories of the great pharaohs and the daily realities of Egyptian life. By recounting the lives and accomplishments of the men and women who made Egypt such a captivating civilization, Professor Brier presents a history of ancient Egypt that spans more than 30 centuries and introduces you to the personalities who made Egypt the greatest nation of the ancient world. Among other things, you'll study: The "Narmer Palette," the first historical document, whose images of Narmer's traditions would endure for 3,000 years; Sneferu, who taught Egypt how to perfect the pyramid, a structure whose origins lay in the need to protect desert graves from exposure by the wind; the discovery of Tutankhamen's tomb, which is the most scrutinized episode in the history of Egyptology; and Cleopatra, the enigmatic Grecian ruler who learned Egypt's language and tried to resurrect both the nation's religion and greatness. Cleopatra's valiant efforts to save Egypt, with the aid of Julius Caesar and, afterward, with Marc Antony, were doomed. Egypt, no longer a nation, would become a Roman province. But the civilization's fascinating story would live on for thousands of years. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2004 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2004 The Great Courses

Narrator: Bob Brier
Length: 6 hrs and 9 mins
Available on Audible
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The Year 1000

1 rating

Summary

From celebrated Yale Professor Valerie Hansen, a groundbreaking work of history showing that bold explorations and daring trade missions connected all of the world’s great societies for the first time at the end of the first millennium. People often believe that the years immediately prior to AD 1000 were, with just a few exceptions, lacking in any major cultural developments or geopolitical encounters, that the Europeans hadn’t yet reached North America, and that the farthest feat of sea travel was the Vikings’ invasion of Britain. But how, then, to explain the presence of blonde-haired people in Maya temple murals at Chichén Itzá, Mexico? Could it be possible that the Vikings had found their way to the Americas during the height of the Maya empire? Valerie Hansen, an award-winning historian, argues that the year 1000 was the world’s first point of major cultural exchange and exploration. Drawing on nearly 30 years of research, she presents a compelling account of first encounters between disparate societies, which sparked conflict and collaboration eerily reminiscent of our contemporary moment. For readers of Jared Diamond’s Guns, Germs, and Steel and Yuval Noah Harari’s Sapiens, The Year 1000 is an intellectually daring, provocative account that will make you rethink everything you thought you knew about how the modern world came to be. It will also hold up a mirror to the hopes and fears we experience today.

©2020 Valerie Hansen (P)2020 Simon & Schuster Audio

Narrator: Cynthia Farrell
Length: 8 hrs and 59 mins
Available on Audible
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The Byzantine Empire

2 ratings

Summary

The Byzantine Empire survived as a self-contained political entity longer than any other in the history of Christianity. From the time Constantine the Great moved the capital of the Roman Empire to the Greek city of Byzantium in AD 330 - which he renamed Constantinople - to its downfall to the Turks in 1453, the great trading emporium and center of Orthodox Christianity remained the most dazzling metropolis in the world. Its palaces, its Hippodrome, its art treasures, and its churches were the wonder of mankind. For more than 1,000 years, Christian civilization was at its zenith in this magical, mysterious, and magnificent city. This history by Charles Oman is a catalog of good, bad, and indifferent emperors who either pushed Byzantine Civilization to new heights or savagely drove it to defeat and dissolution. It is a strange tale populated by some of the most interesting men and women who have ever lived. But few events have riveted the imagination or wrung the heart as did the fall of Constantinople, first to the Crusaders in 1203, then to the Turks in 1453. With its passage into the hands of the Ottoman Empire, European history entered a new era and Byzantine Civilization disappeared forever. However, thousands of Byzantine scholars fled to the West, bringing valuable knowledge which hastened the flowering of the Italian Renaissance. Listen as one of the most poignant stories in European history unfolds.

Public Domain (P)2016 Audio Connoisseur

Author: Charles Oman
Length: 9 hrs and 22 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for La Mythologie

La Mythologie

1 rating

Summary

Edith Hamilton est sans doute la seule autrice à avoir saisi toute l'importance que gardent, à notre époque, les mythes et les légendes, qui sont le fondement même de notre culture, et où nous puisons encore une si large inspiration. Remontant aux sources, c'est chez les poètes Homère, Hésiode, Pindare, Ovide qu'elle retrouve la substance des grands thèmes mythologiques et nous les restitue, dans leur spontanéité, leur efficacité, sous forme de merveilleuses histoires : Orphée et Eurydice, Philémon et Baucis, Tantale et Niobé, les travaux d'Hercule, le défi d'Icare, la descente de Thésée aux Enfers. L'ouvrage le plus clair et le plus complet sur la mythologie, lu magistralement par Thierry Janssen.  Lorsque vous achetez ce titre, le fichier PDF qui l'accompagne sera disponible dans votre confirmation d'achat envoyée par mail ainsi que dans votre bibliothèque, depuis votre ordinateur.

©1940 / 1942 / 1962 / 1978 / 1997 / 2008 Edith Hamilton / Gérard & Co / Marabout / Alleur (Belgique) /Marabout (Hachette livre) (P)2019 Audiolib

Narrator: Thierry Janssen
Length: 14 hrs
Available on Audible
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The Fall of the Pagans and the Origins of Medieval Christianity

16 ratings

Summary

Explore the dramatic interaction between Judaism, Christianity, and paganism in Rome from the 1st to the 6th centuries. Why did pagan Rome clash with the early Christians? What was it like to be a Jew or a Christian under Roman law? And how did Christianity ultimately achieve dominance in the Roman Empire? Over the course of 24 lectures, Professor Harl enables you to grasp the full historical sweep of this critically important era and its key figures. You'll examine why Christianity was able to emerge and endure and, in turn, spark a critical transition for religion, culture, and politics that underpins much of how today's Western world - both Christian and non-Christian alike - thinks about ethics, sin, redemption, forgiveness, progress, and so much more. While the Judeo-Christian values that have shaped society's ideas are ones we might today take for granted, their emergence from an ancient era dominated by loyalties to a vast array of gods would once have seemed the most unlikely of narratives. Even after the Roman emperor Constantine converted to Christianity in A.D. 312, it would not be until the 6th-century reign of Justinian that medieval Christianity would emerge and this new historical pathway confirmed. In this magnificent course, Professor Harl brings to life some of the most important and fascinating episodes of the era, taking you on a vibrant trek through the past - one that will lead you to a deeper understanding of the bedrock beliefs of Western culture. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2011 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2011 The Great Courses

Narrator: Kenneth W. Harl
Length: 12 hrs and 33 mins
Available on Audible
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Greek Mythology

Summary

Greek Mythology Have you ever wondered about the legendary Olympian Gods that have been documented and portrayed across different medias? Do you know what mythology says about them and who they were, really? The mysterious Olympian Gods and Ancient Greek Heroes have been explained clearly and completely in this book. For the lovers of ancient mythology, this book brings valuable insights into Greek mythology, ancient culture and much more. The book provides valuable insight into the polytheistic religion of the Ancient Greece and gives an in-depth knowledge about Greek culture. This book has connected all the pieces of the puzzle and presents a unique tapestry interwoven with multiple threads from the different sides of Greek mythology that contains all the answers about the legendary Olympian Gods and Heroes. Greek Mythology provides: A detailed account of the Greek gods and heroes An insight into the Greek polytheistic religion The most important myths of Greek mythology Fanciful tales about all the Greek mythological creatures and deities

©2020 Josh Drake (P)2021 Josh Drake

Narrator: James Parker
Author: Josh Drake
Length: 3 hrs and 50 mins
Available on Audible
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The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Volume I

1 rating

Summary

The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire has always maintained its initial appeal to both the general public and scholars alike. Its sheer scale is daunting, encompassing over a millennium of history, covering not merely the Western Empire from the days of the early emperors to its extinction in AD 476, but also the Eastern Empire, which lasted for another thousand years until the Turks vanquished it in 1453. But Gibbon’s style, part historical fact and part literature, is enticing, and the sheer honesty of the man, who endeavours to be scrupulously impartial in his presentation, endears him to the reader. In this recording, David Timson incorporates the most salient of Gibbon’s footnotes. In Volume I (chapters I-XV), Gibbon opens by setting the scene with the Empire as it stood in the time of Augustus (d. AD 14) before praising the time of the Antonines (AD 98-180). The death of Marcus Aurelius and the accession of Commodus and his successors ushers in turbulent and dangerous times which were only occasionally marked by a wise and temperate ruler. The volume ends in AD 324, with Constantine the Great becoming undisputed Roman emperor, uniting both the East and Western Empires. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

Public Domain (P)2014 Naxos AudioBooks

Narrator: David Timson
Length: 22 hrs and 39 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Mansa Musa and Timbuktu: A Fascinating History from Beginning to End

Mansa Musa and Timbuktu: A Fascinating History from Beginning to End

1 rating

Summary

If you want to learn the fascinating life of Mansa Musa and Timbuktu then keep reading... On the West coast of Africa there once, the Mali empire in its Golden Age was once bigger than the entirety of Western Europe put together, made possible by the efforts of one man Mansa Musa the Sultan of Mali. He was the richest man to have ever lived, worth 400 billion dollars in today's terms, his gold mines supplied the British Empire and the rest of the European Empires for 800 years, despite the dry desolate environment of Mali he founded the greatest center of learning in all of world Timbuktu, his great holy pilgrimage to Mecca was the greatest the world had seen 60,000 pilgrims joined him as he traveled causing inflation of the local currencies of the lands he went through from all the gold he spent. He was one of the most legendary Africa Kings Mansa Musa of all time,who changed the world forever his legacy is still felt today. In Mansa Musa and Timbuktu: A Fascinating History from Beginning to End you will discover topics such as: History of Mali  Mansa Musa the Great Sultan Trade In Mansa Musas Empire The Greatest Hajj In History Timbuktu the Learning Center of World Present Day Mali Legacy of Mansa Musa And Much Much More! Buy now to begin listening about this fascinating man that made history!

©2020 World Changing History (P)2020 World Changing History

Narrator: Darseaux James
Length: 1 hr and 41 mins
Available on Audible
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Books That Matter: The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

3 ratings

Summary

Published in six volumes between 1776 and 1781, The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire - for all its renown - can be intimidating. It contains one point five million words, an estimated 8,000 footnotes, a cast of 10,000 historical figures, and a timeline of more than 1,000 years. Yet even today, Gibbon's historical chronicle demands to be understood. These 24 lectures invite you on a riveting examination of this great work as a vast historical chronicle, a compelling masterpiece of literature, a sharp commentary on cultural mores, and a cautionary tale to Enlightenment Europe. In this chapter-by-chapter guide to the Decline and Fall, Professor Damrosch helps you navigate the book's themes, structure, and lasting influence. You'll approach the Decline and Fall as a written work whose footnotes, periodic style, and historical blind spots reflect the styles and ideologies of the Enlightenment age in which it was written. And for those intimidated by its thousands of pages or who feel they may lack the time to fully appreciate Gibbon's narrative of how Rome fell to "barbarism and religion", these lectures offer a richly detailed overview of what Gibbon called "many of the events most interesting in human annals", including: the reign of the Antonines, the rise of Christianity and Islam, the codification of Roman law, the Crusades, and the dawn of medieval Europe. Whether you've read the Decline and Fall before or whether you've always wanted to read it but never knew where to start, Professor Damrosch's lectures are an authoritative guide to a once-mighty empire - and the great book that became its classic eulogy and epitaph. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2017 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2017 The Great Courses

Narrator: Leo Damrosch
Length: 12 hrs and 14 mins
Available on Audible
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Catiline's War

Summary

Catiline's War, by Sallust, who was better known as Gaius Sallustius Crispus, (86-c. 35 BC), tells of the conspiracy in 63 BCE led by L. Sergius Catilina, who plotted to assassinate numerous senators and take control of the Roman government but was thwarted by Cicero. Sallust describes Catiline as the enemy of law, order, and morality. Cataline fled Rome, and his much-reduced army first tried to reach Gaul but was blocked. Eventually it engaged the army of Gaius Antonius near Pistoia where Cataline died in battle. Sallust wrote in a distinctive Latin style that is quite different from other historians of the era.

Public Domain (P)2020 Museum Audiobooks

Narrator: John Eliot
Author: Sallust
Length: 2 hrs and 35 mins
Available on Audible
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Roman Britain: A History from Beginning to End

Summary

This audiobook takes a holistic look at Roman Britain, from the events leading up to its official inception in AD 43 until the Romans left the Isle entirely around AD 409. The timeline is straightforward, and each chapter delves into some aspect of Romano-British life: dealing with the concept of the Celts; when Britannia actually became Roman; how the two peoples attempted to blend their culture through religion; and lastly, why the Romans had to leave. Inside you will read about.... "The Timeline" "Ancient Celtic Ethnicity, a Modern Invention" "The Beginnings of Roman Britain" "Religion and Blending Culture in Roman Britain" "The Bitter End" It can be difficult to explain everything from a neutral, unbiased perspective as most of the records from the time are Roman in nature, but drawing on a variety of perspectives from archaeologists and historians alike has made for a thought-provoking assessment of the era. Rome's power bestowed cities like London and York to Britannia, and their lasting influence is still visible today in places like Bath and at Hadrian's Wall to the north. Roman Britain lingers on still.

©2016 Henry Freeman (P)2017 Henry Freeman

Length: 1 hr and 13 mins
Available on Audible
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Alexander the Great and the Macedonian Empire

29 ratings

Summary

Alexander the Great - one of the most renowned figures in antiquity - has inspired everything from medieval romances to blockbuster movies, and military leaders from Julius Caesar to Napoleon to the U.S. general Norman Schwarzkopf. But who was this great king of Macedon? And why is he so legendary? Go beyond the myth and learn about the man who changed the face of the ancient world and laid the foundation for the great traditions of the Roman Empire - all in fewer than 12 years. These 36 spellbinding lectures take you deep inside the world of Alexander to witness the astonishing feats of military genius that made his name renowned for millennia after his death. Through this detailed portrait, you'll go beyond the legends and the myths to truly understand what made Alexander great. Along the way, several Alexanders emerge: the military general, Macedonian king, Persian emperor, Egyptian pharaoh, and leader of the Hellenic League. You learn about the many aspects of this extraordinary individual - his passions, extraordinary talents, and the training that helped mold his character. You'll learn how battles were fought and won in the ancient world and examine Alexander's great martial achievements within this larger military history. You'll also head onto the battlefield to analyze some of Alexander's greatest triumphs, including the Battle of the Granicus River and the Battle of the Hydaspes River. Alexander's empire did not survive beyond his lifetime, but his legacy has cast a long shadow on the history of the West. Join Professor Harl for this journey into the world of Alexander and see how the Western world - and, indeed, our world - still bear the marks of this legendary conqueror. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2010 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2010 The Great Courses

Narrator: Kenneth W. Harl
Length: 18 hrs and 29 mins
Available on Audible
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Great Ancient Civilizations of Asia Minor

15 ratings

Summary

Embark on an unforgettable trip into the historical glories of the past with these 24 lectures that immerse you in the history of an often overlooked region of the ancient world. With Professor Harl as your guide, you'll plunge into the history of Asia Minor's great ancient civilizations and come face to face with eye-opening historical milestones. Among these: the rise of the Hittites, the legendary Trojan War, the birth of Western philosophy, the fiery Greek and Persian Wars, the victories of Alexander the Great, the dawn of the Hellenistic Age, the spread of early Christianity, the golden age of Byzantium, the birth of the Ottoman Empire, and much more. Cultural change and continuity are the main themes of these lectures. You'll come to see how each successive civilization inherited and modified the political, social, religious, and economic institutions of its predecessor. In fact, the scope of Anatolian history can be best understood as a series of major cultural and religious rewrites: first by the Hittite emperors; then by the elites of Hellenic cities; next by their Hellenized descendants in the Roman age; then by Christian emperors and bishops in the Byzantine age; and, finally, by Turkish rulers and Muslim mystics. To give you a stronger sense of that continuity (and the various changes that are a part of it), these lectures are organized into five cultural components: Early Anatolia (from 6000 to 500 B.C.), Hellenized Anatolia (from 750 to 31 B.C.), Roman Asia Minor (from 200 B.C. to 395 A.D.), Byzantium (from 395 to 1453), and Islamic Turkey (since 1071).

©2001 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2001 The Great Courses

Narrator: Kenneth W. Harl
Length: 12 hrs and 11 mins
Available on Audible
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The Roman Empire

2 ratings

Summary

Explore the captivating history of the Roman Empire. The Roman Empire was one of the most powerful forces the world has ever seen. But this isn’t just the story of conquest or the incredible system of institutions that made it possible. The Roman Empire is not yet another boring historical topic. On the contrary, it wakes our imagination, scares us, and entertains us. This is the story of the fascinating men and women - the emperors, their wives, parents, brothers, sisters, and children - who gave the empire its characteristic charm. Some of them, like Marcus Aurelius and Antoninus Pius, were virtuous and wise; others - like Caligula, Commodus, and Caracalla - were monstrous, insane predators whose thirst for blood and sexual habits were beyond believable. This is the story of the most important people and events between the two crucial events - the rise of Augustus in the first century BC and the final sack of Rome in the late fifth century AD. Some of the topics covered in this audiobook include: From the Republic to the Empire: The rise of Octavian The age of Augustus The Julio-Claudian dynasty after Augustus: From Tiberius to Nero Civil war and the year of the four emperors (AD 68-69) The Flavians The Nerva-Antonine dynasty: The five good emperors (and a couple of not-so-good ones) Some new emperors Crises, civil wars, and divisions: The long and painful decline Two Empires: East and West And a great deal more you don't want to miss out on! Get the audiobook now to learn more about the Roman Empire!

©2018 Captivating History (P)2018 Captivating History

Narrator: Duke Holm
Length: 2 hrs and 15 mins
Available on Audible
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Ancient African Kingdoms

Summary

If you want to discover the captivating history of ancient Africa and the Kingdom of Kush, then pay attention.... Two captivating manuscripts in one audiobook: Ancient Africa: A Captivating Guide to Ancient African Civilizations, Such as the Kingdom of Kush, the Land of Punt, Carthage, the Kingdom of Aksum, and the Mali Empire with Its Timbuktu The Kingdom of Kush: A Captivating Guide to an Ancient African Kingdom in Nubia That Once Ruled Egypt Africa is the continent where the first humans were born. They explored the vast land and produced the first tools. And although we migrated from that continent, we never completely abandoned it. From the beginning of time, humans lived and worked in Africa, leaving evidence of their existence in the sands of the Sahara Desert and the valleys of the great rivers such as the Nile and the Niger.  Some of the earliest great civilizations were born there, and they give us an insight into the smaller kingdoms of ancient Africa.  Some of the topics covered in part one of this audiobook include: The Kingdom of Kush The Land of Punt Carthage The Kingdom of Aksum The Ghana Empire The Mali Empire And much, much more! Some of the topics covered in part two of this audiobook include:  Nubia and the emergence of the Kingdom of Kush From Alara to the Twenty-Fifth Dynasty The rulers of the Twenty-Fifth Dynasty Relations between Kush and Egypt continue Kush between the sixth and third centuries The Meroitic Dynasty The last centuries of the Kingdom of Kush The society of Kush And much, much more! So, if you want to learn more about ancient Africa and the Kingdom of Kush, then get this audiobook now!

©2020 Captivating History (P)2020 Captivating History

Narrator: Jason Zenobia
Length: 7 hrs and 30 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The History of Rome, Volume 4, Books 26-32

The History of Rome, Volume 4, Books 26-32

1 rating

Summary

No historian has ever possessed the ability to highlight dramatic episodes in the manner that Livy accomplished. He had an uncanny feel for the narrative potential inherent in historical works, and he brought out the drama so well that, even after 2,000 years, we still feel a stirring thrill whenever we hear his retelling of the epic grandeur of the Roman Republic. In this volume, Hannibal and Carthage are finally worn down by the grim determination of the Roman people, and their army is destroyed at Zama by Publius Scipio. And hardly is this over before the vengeful Romans cast their eyes eastward to Philip of Macedon, who had made the fatal error of backing the Carthaginians. Livy's The History of Rome continues in an additional two volumes. Translation: William Masfen Roberts.

Public Domain (P)2011 Audio Connoisseur

Length: 18 hrs and 34 mins
Available on Audible
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Myths of Babylonia and Assyria

1 rating

Summary

Myths of Babylonia and Assyria takes a look at the ancient history and mythology of Mesopotamia. The audiobook examines the myths and legends of Babylonia and Assyria, and how these ancient tales reflect the beliefs and development of early civilization. The audiobook begins with the early Sumerian Age and concludes 30 centuries later with the Greek Empire.

Public Domain (P)2019 Museum Audiobooks

Narrator: Teagan McKenzie
Length: 13 hrs and 29 mins
Available on Audible
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The Pleistocene Era

Summary

The Pleistocene spans a period from around 2.5 million years ago (mya) to just over 12,000 years ago, and it was an epoch of enormous change on Earth, mainly characterized by climate changes involving fluctuations between periods of extreme heat and long periods of glaciation. This period is commonly known as the Ice Age, despite the fact there were actually a number of separate periods of cold. Along with the climate challenges, this was also the period that saw the development of modern humans. The origin of our ancient ancestors is still a matter of debate among paleontologists, and classification systems for early hominoids are constantly being updated as new discoveries are made.  What is generally agreed upon is the species Homo sapiens belong to the order primates and the suborder anthropoids. Within the anthropoids suborder, humans belong to the family hominids, which also includes other animals such as the orangutan and the great apes. Drilling down even further, humans belong to a subgroup of hominids known as hominin. The subgroup hominin includes humans as well as chimpanzees and gorillas. Discoveries have revealed more than 20 species of the genus Homo, all of which appeared during the Pleistocene Epoch, and all but Homo sapiens became extinct during the same period. The challenge is in understanding which of these groups are predecessors to Homo sapiens and which are separate groups that died out leaving no current representation. Not knowing this information makes it difficult to determine neat classification and establish precisely when hominins separated from the rest of the non-hominin primates. It is generally accepted that hominoids and the first hominins evolved in what is now Africa. Somewhere around seven mya, the common hominoid lineage split into two distinct evolutionary lines: the ancestors of modern chimpanzees and those of modern humans. Around 2.5 mya, a new genus of hominin appeared. Homo had larger brains than their predecessors as well as smaller jaws and teeth. The very first stone tools date to this period, when there were a number of different hominin species. The very first true humans, Homo erectus, appeared around two mya. These new creatures could hardly have chosen a more difficult time to appear. In addition to facing the challenges of simply surviving in a generally hostile environment, the world was about to enter a period of convulsive climatic change. The new humans would face drought and extreme heat, as well as long periods of cooling where glaciers spread across the surface of the planet, but they survived, and by the time the Pleistocene Epoch ended around 12,000 years ago, Homo sapiens had become one of the most significant species on the planet. The Pleistocene Era: The History of the Ice Age and the Dawn of Modern Humans looks at the development of the era, what life on Earth was like, and the origins of archaic humans.

©2020 Charles River Editors (P)2020 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Daniel Houle
Length: 2 hrs and 22 mins
Available on Audible
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The Origin of Civilization

5 ratings

Summary

What defines a civilization? How did the first states emerge? How were the world's ancient states similar and different? Answer these and other dramatic questions with this grand 48-lecture course that reveals how human beings around the world transitioned from small farming communities to the impressive cultural and political systems that would alter the course of history. Taking a gripping archaeological and historical approach to formative states such as the ancient Egyptians, the Chinese, and the Maya, Professor MacEachern completes your understanding of the history of civilization by exploring it at its earliest stages. Unlike traditional surveys of ancient civilizations, which tend to focus only on the glorious achievements of these cultures, you'll look at those first all-important steps that the world's first civilizations would take on the road to glory. You'll investigate places such as Mesopotamia, where agriculture laid the foundation for groundbreaking experiments in social and political development in places like Uruk and Sumer; the eastern Mediterranean, where expanding maritime trade during the Bronze Age increasingly knit the different societies of these islands into a web of political and economic relationships; and Mesoamerica, where the indigenous states in and around what are now Mexico, Honduras, and Nicaragua reveal the full flowering of Olmec and Maya civilization. You'll also take an engaging look at what archaeologists have learned from some of the world's oldest and most intriguing sites. In the end, these lectures will leave you awestruck at the diverse ways that ancient people crafted complex systems - systems whose broad strokes remain with us even today.

©2010 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2010 The Great Courses

Length: 24 hrs and 3 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for From Yao to Mao: 5000 Years of Chinese History

From Yao to Mao: 5000 Years of Chinese History

43 ratings

Summary

For most of its 5,000-year existence, China has been the largest, most populous, wealthiest, and mightiest nation on Earth. And for us as Westerners, it is essential to understand where China has been in order to anticipate its future. These 36 eye-opening lectures deliver a comprehensive political and historical overview of one of the most fascinating and complex countries in world history. You'll learn about the powerful dynasties that ruled China for centuries; the philosophical and religious foundations-particularly Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism-that have influenced every iteration of Chinese thought, and the larger-than-life personalities, from both inside and outside its borders, of those who have shaped China's history. As you listen to these lectures, you'll see how China's politics, economics, and art reflect the forces of its past. From the "Mandate of Heaven," a theory of social contract in place by 1500 B.C.E., 3,000 years before Western philosophers such as Thomas Hobbes and John Locke, to the development of agriculture and writing independent of outside influence to the technologically - advanced Han Dynasty during the time of the Roman Empire, this course takes you on a journey across ground that has been largely unexplored in the history courses most of us in the West have taken. In guiding you through the five millennia of China's history, Professor Hammond tells a fascinating story with an immense scope, a welcome reminder that China is no stranger to that stage and, indeed, has more often than not been the most extraordinary player on it. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2004 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2004 The Great Courses

Length: 18 hrs and 14 mins
Available on Audible
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Life in Ancient Rome

Summary

Lionel Casson paints a vivid portrait of life in ancient Rome - for slaves and emperors, soldiers and commanders alike - during the empire's greatest period, the first and second centuries AD.

©2015 American Heritage (P)2017 HighBridge, a Division of Recorded Books

Length: 5 hrs and 8 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Roman Republic: A Captivating Guide to the Rise and Fall of the Roman Republic, SPQR and Roman Politicians Such as Julius Caesar and Cicero

The Roman Republic: A Captivating Guide to the Rise and Fall of the Roman Republic, SPQR and Roman Politicians Such as Julius Caesar and Cicero

2 ratings

Summary

Explore the captivating history of the Roman republic  When we think of ancient Rome, the first notion that comes to mind is the one of the empire, followed by the image of a mighty emperor, his legions, colossal buildings, and the Gladiators (or the rhetoric and poetry, depending on your preferences). Some may recall the image of a “unified” Europe under a single sovereign - the emperor of Rome. However, Rome did not become remarkable at this considerably late phase. In fact, many historians see the history of Rome under the Emperors as a long, gradual decline. It was during the republic that Rome gained an empire. Most of the achievements that the first emperor of Rome, Octavian Augustus, claimed to have completed were, in fact, earned during the Roman republic.   In this audiobook, we’ll have a close look at the beginning of Roman civilization, the foundation of the city and the Senate, the expansion of the Roman republic, its glory, and its end.   Some of the topics covered in this audiobook include:   The past that made it possible: The foundation of Rome between myth and history Down with the kings: The past that made it happen Early tepublic Military achievements of early republic: Taking Italy Middle republic: The Punic Wars and Mediterranean dominance The military vs. cultural dominance: The Roman civilization meets the Greek world Limitless power and the beginning of the end: The late republic The age of the generals: Pompeius, Crassus, and Caesar Senatus Populus-Que Romanus (SPQR) and its downfall The rise and fall of Julius Caesar and the end of the Roman republic And more! Get the audiobook now to learn more about the Roman republic.

©2018 Captivating History (P)2018 Captivating History

Narrator: Duke Holm
Length: 2 hrs and 23 mins
Available on Audible
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The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

Summary

This is the complete and unabridged collection of all six volumes from The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire.  The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire by Edward Gibbon (an English historian) is a six-volume collection that examines the fate of one of the most renowned civilizations in history, the Roman Empire. This historical account by Gibbon is widely considered by many as one of the greatest works of history ever written. In this masterpiece, Gibbon covers the time periods from the second century A.D. to the 15th century, and takes a look at the history of early Christianity along with the Roman State church, the history of Europe and the Middle East along with the rise of Islam, and the events that lead to the collapse of the Roman Empire among many other historical events.

©2020 Goffin Media (P)2020 Goffin Media

Length: 108 hrs and 3 mins
Available on Audible
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In the Shadow of the Sword

39 ratings

Summary

In the 6th century AD, the Near East was divided between two venerable empires: the Persian and the Roman. A hundred years on and one had vanished forever, while the other seemed almost finished. Ruling in their place were the Arabs: an upheaval so profound that it spelt, in effect, the end of the ancient world. In The Shadow of the Sword, Tom Holland explores how this came about. Spanning from Constantinople to the Arabian desert, and starring some of the most remarkable rulers who ever lived, he tells a story vivid with drama, horror, and startling achievement.

©2012 Tom Holland (P)2012 Hachette Digital

Narrator: Jonathan Keeble
Author: Tom Holland
Length: 17 hrs and 50 mins
Available on Audible
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The Cushite

Summary

Rufus L. Perry was an educator and Baptist minister from Brooklyn, New York. He was a member of the African Civilization Society and was a co-founder of the Howard Colored Orphan Asylum. The Cushite is a short work that investigates the history of the ancient peoples.

Public Domain (P)2020 Museum Audiobooks

Length: 5 hrs and 29 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Uncovering Greek Mythology: A Beginner's Guide into the World of Greek Gods and Goddesses

Uncovering Greek Mythology: A Beginner's Guide into the World of Greek Gods and Goddesses

Summary

Get to know the Greek gods and goddesses, from the mighty Zeus, to the temperamental Poseidon, the beautiful Aphrodite, and every character from A to Z. Who wouldn’t want to hear about Zeus and his command of lightning, Hades and how he found his bride, the wisdom of Athena, and so many other stories that capture the imagination. These stories can do more than just entertain; they can also inspire and teach us lessons that were penned by the Greeks themselves. Starting with the creation myth, this audiobook will take you through the stories of the Titans, introduce the Olympians, bring in the demigods, and sneak a peek at the monsters that made up the mythology. You’ll learn who all the gods and goddesses were in relation to one another, mythological explanations for natural events, and why any of this still matters today. In addition, you’ll discover:  The names, powers, and significance of all the major Greek gods and goddesses Rich stories based around the Greek pantheon Moral lessons and cultural values important to the Greeks, preserved in their mythology A brief history of Greek civilization and how they worshipped their gods and goddesses Creatures of Greek mythology that still feature in modern tales today And so much more Greek history! Up on Mount Olympus, along the shores of the Mediterranean, and deep in the Underworld, gods, goddesses, demigods, and creatures linger in the mind and stories of an ancient culture. This culture gave us science, philosophy, and a rich mythology that never stops enticing us. To appreciate the power of their stories for yourself and become absorbed in a world so like and yet unlike our own, buy this audiobook now.

©2020 Lucas Russo (P)2021 Lucas Russo

Narrator: Jared Zak
Author: Lucas Russo
Length: 3 hrs and 18 mins
Available on Audible
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Maya Civilization: A History from Beginning to End

Summary

Discover the remarkable history of the Maya Civilization... For more than one thousand years, the Maya people dominated areas of Central America and modern-day Mexico and made important advances in architecture, astronomy, mathematics, and medicine. Then, after the Spanish occupation in the 16th century, Maya culture and thinking were deliberately suppressed. Only in the 20th century did scientists appreciate just how advanced these people had been and how important they were in the history of Mesoamerica. The excavation and investigation of several large Maya cities in the second half of the 20th century completely changed how we view these people. We now know that the Maya were capable of building vary large stone structures that were precisely aligned with astronomical features, though we do not know how this was done. We are still learning about Maya cities - as recently as 2018, the use of new technology uncovered more than 60,000 previously undiscovered Maya ruins in the jungles of Guatemala. Many scholars now believe that the Maya were one of the most important of all the ancient Mesoamerican cultures. There are still many mysteries about the Maya. At one point in their history, several major Maya cities were abandoned and left to the encroaching jungle while their people relocated to more inhospitable areas in the Yucatán. There are many theories, but no one is entirely certain why this happened. We also don’t know why the Maya made important advances in the fields of mathematics and medicine and yet failed to develop, for example, the wheel or metalworking. What we do know is that these people created a sophisticated culture which they recorded via one of the first complex writing systems. Unlike other contemporary Mesoamerican peoples, the Maya survived the Spanish occupation, and Maya language, religion, and culture continue to survive today in parts of Central America and Mexico. This is the story of the mysterious and frequently misunderstood Maya civilization. Discover a plethora of topics such as: Origins Maya Religion and Medicine The Classic Period Weapons and Warfare The Spanish Conquest Maya Writing And much more! So if you want a concise and informative audiobook on the Maya Civilization, simply get this audiobook now!

©2020 Hourly History (P)2020 Hourly History

Narrator: Mike Nelson
Length: 1 hr and 12 mins
Available on Audible
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Exploring the Roots of Religion

7 ratings

Summary

What impulse drove ancient cultures to create sites like Stonehenge, Machu Picchu, and the pyramids at Giza? Why are we so transfixed by their presence today? And what do they reveal about our ancestors-and humanity? The dynamic force of religious belief is responsible for some of the world's most popular and ancient locales.With these 36 riveting lectures, you can dig through the earth and learn how sacred buildings, complexes, tomb structures, artwork, and more have provided us with unparalleled knowledge about early spiritual experiences around the world. Using the tools and knowledge of their field, archaeologists can now determine the nature of a sacrificial ritual, compare the visible attributes of ancient deities, and map out the orientation of a temple or tomb. Professor Hale gives you a comprehensive look at specific religious archaeological sites around the world-inside caves and crypts, through vast deserts and ancient cities, from Polynesia to Mexico to the American Midwest. Studying these breathtaking sites such as Lascaux Cave, Machu Picchu, and Easter Island, you learn the points of interest that attract the attention of archaeologists and scholars, survey the principal features unearthed during the site's excavation, discover what evidence at the site reveals about the evolution of religion, and more. By the final lap of your international journey, you'll have developed a new vision of religion and its crucial role in ancient history. You'll become more attuned to spirituality's universal elements and its unique characteristics. And you'll realize just how much credit religion deserves for remarkable sites that continue to captivate us. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2009 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2009 The Great Courses

Narrator: John R. Hale
Length: 18 hrs and 20 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Rise and Fall of the Roman and British Empire plus the Crusades

The Rise and Fall of the Roman and British Empire plus the Crusades

Summary

How did we get here, to this time and place in history? Are we repeating history's mistakes because we did not learn about the pivotal events that shaped the modern world? This three-book history course helps you quickly understand the nuances and the impact of three crucial periods portrayed in countless films: the Crusades and of the rise and fall of two great empires, the Roman and British. The culture, technology, law, and military organization of the Roman Empire shaped western civilization. Determined to spread their rule, the Romans succeeded magnificently until human nature and other factors led to the empire's collapse. Were current relationships between Christians and Muslims determined when the knights of the Crusades rode off on their grand quest? By the beginning of the 20th century, the British Empire and its superior navy claimed territory larger than that of any other empire in history, but its overreach foretold its downfall. This insightful and critically acclaimed history of the British Empire spans from the 17th century to contemporary time and combines comprehensive scholarship with popular history.

©2016 Michael Klein (P)2016 Michael Klein

Length: 12 hrs and 32 mins
Available on Audible
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Famous Greeks

5 ratings

Summary

Join Professor Fears for this riveting 24-lecture examination of fascinating figures who shaped the story of Greece from the Trojan War through the rise of Rome. What do their lives, studied in the context of their times, tell us about virtue and vice, folly and wisdom, success and failure?  Inspired and informed by the monumental works of Homer, Herodotus, Thucydides, and Plutarch, these lectures allow you to do exactly that, guided by a truly great teacher. From the heroes of the Trojan War to Alexander the Great and Cleopatra, Professor Fears ushers you into the lives, achievements, and influence of many of the figures who made Greek history.  Among these are great warriors such as Achilles, Agamemnon, Hector, Odysseus, and Alexander the Great; masterful statesmen including Lycurgus, Solon, and Philip of Macedonia; profound thinkers like Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle; and artists and writers such as Homer, Herodotus, Sophocles, Thucydides, and Plutarch. These lectures are informed by a fine moral awareness and a deep familiarity with the times these famous lives were lived. By exploring these famous Greek lives in this context, you'll also discover new ways to read familiar classics by Homer, Herodotus, Thucydides, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Xenophon, and Plato. And in keeping with that historical spirit, Professor Fears draws lessons from each life studied in this course, charting with you the intellectual and artistic currents of one of the most creative civilizations in world history. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2001 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2001 The Great Courses

Narrator: J. Rufus Fears
Length: 12 hrs and 22 mins
Available on Audible
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Viking Sagas

Summary

Explore captivating Viking Sagas. The period between the end of the eighth century CE and the middle of the 11th is often called the “Viking Age” because this is the period in which Scandinavian people expanded their contacts with the outside world through trade, raiding, exploration, and colonization.  This volume presents a version of Ragnar’s saga compiled from different modern sources, along with information providing additional historical and documentary context, followed by a discussion of some aspects of modern appropriations and representations of ancient Norse culture.  The first section of the book provides historical context for Ragnar’s saga through an exploration of daily life in ninth century Scandinavia and of contemporary Viking culture and history.  The text of the saga itself forms the second part of the book, along with notes giving further information about how this version of the saga is presented and about elements within the story that might not be familiar to modern listeners.  The third section of the book deals with representations of ancient Norse cultures in modern popular media.  Within this book, you'll find the following the Viking Sagas and topics covered: The world of Ragnar Lothbrok The saga of Ragnar Lothbrok and his sons Representations of Norse myths and history in modern media The clash of history and drama in the History Channel television series Vikings And much more! Get the audiobook now and learn more about Viking Sagas!

©2020 Matt Clayton (P)2020 Matt Clayton

Narrator: Michael Reaves
Author: Matt Clayton
Length: 3 hrs and 12 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Mycenaeans: The History and Culture of Ancient Greece's First Advanced Civilization

The Mycenaeans: The History and Culture of Ancient Greece's First Advanced Civilization

Summary

When people think of ancient Greece, images of philosophers such as Plato or Socrates often come to mind, as do great warriors like Pericles and Alexander the Great. But hundreds of years before Athens became a city, a Greek culture flourished and spread its tentacles throughout the Western Mediterranean region via trade and warfare. Scholars have termed this preclassical Greek culture the Mycenaean culture. It existed from about 2000 to 1200 BCE, when Greece, along with much of the Eastern Mediterranean, was thrust into a centuries-long dark age. Before the Mycenaean culture collapsed, it was a vital part of the late Bronze Age Mediterranean system and stood on equal footing with some of the great powers of the region, such as the Egyptians and Hittites. Despite being ethnic Greeks and speaking a language that was the direct predecessor of classical Greek, the Mycenaeans had more in common with their neighbors from the island of Crete, who are known today as the Minoans. Due to their cultural affinities with the Minoans and the fact that they conquered Crete yet still carried on many Minoan traditions, the Mycenaeans are viewed by some scholars as the later torchbearers of a greater Aegean civilization. This is similar to the way the Romans carried on Hellenic civilization after the Greeks. Given that the Mycenaeans played such a vital role in history in the late Bronze Age, it would be natural to assume there are countless studies and accurate chronologies on the subject, but the opposite is true. Although the Mycenaeans were literate, the corpus of written texts from the period is minimal, so modern scholars are left to use a variety of methods in order to reconstruct a proper history of Mycenaean culture.

©2012 Charles River Editors (P)2015 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Gabrielle Byrne
Length: 1 hr and 16 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Greek Mythology: A Concise Guide to Ancient Gods, Heroes, Beliefs and Myths of Greek Mythology

Greek Mythology: A Concise Guide to Ancient Gods, Heroes, Beliefs and Myths of Greek Mythology

1 rating

Summary

Greek Mythology is an enormous field of study, and a brief guide is a daunting task for any writer. The myths have a way of entwining with one another, and it is difficult to present a coherent story line without feeling one has omitted the best part of the story. Inside you will read about.... What is a myth? The sources of Greek mythology The creation of the universe and the gods What of man What of woman? The Greek Pantheon The Trojan War The influence of Greek drama Two Greek mortal heroes in mythological tales This guide succeeds in presenting an overall sketch of the creation of the world and the battles that follow, resulting in Zeus taking his place as the supreme god and ruling the earth from Mount Olympus. It covers the creation of man, it seems as a bit of an afterthought for the amusement of the Olympians, and some of the most famous stories that have come down to us via the writings of the great dramatists of the Classical Age. There are concise biographies of the twelve gods that make up the Olympians as well as of the heroes of the Trojan War.

©2016 Hourly History (P)2017 Hourly History

Narrator: Bridger Conklin
Length: 1 hr and 16 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for History: The Rise and Fall of the Spartan Empire

History: The Rise and Fall of the Spartan Empire

1 rating

Summary

This book contains the daily life, culture, training, battles, history, and kings of the Spartan Empire. From the birth of their city to the end, the Spartans endured a history of violence and war. Similar to their stories, the traditional Spartan warrior also lived the daily life of a soldier. From the moment they were born and if they were allowed to live, they were trained and conditioned to be some of the most efficient and lethal killing machines. Dominating the land through some of the most famous battles of all time, the Spartans were a force to be reckoned with. Here is a preview of what you'll learn... The beginnings of the Spartan Empire Rise of the Spartan Empire The prime The fall Kings of Sparta The Spartan warrior Spartan lifestyle Download your copy today!

©2016 Robert Paulson (P)2016 Robert Paulson

Narrator: Daniel Hawking
Length: 1 hr and 14 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Empires of Ancient Persia

The Empires of Ancient Persia

Summary

Lying in the middle of a plain in modern day Iran is a forgotten ancient city: Persepolis. Built two and a half thousand years ago, it was known in its day as the richest city under the sun. Persepolis was the capital of Achaemenid Persian Empire, the largest empire the world had ever seen, but after its destruction, it was largely forgotten for nearly 2,000 years, and the lives and achievements of those who built it were almost entirely erased from history. Alexander the Great’s troops razed the city to the ground in a drunken riot to celebrate the conquest of the capital, after which time and sand buried it for centuries. It was not until the excavations of the 1930s that many of the relics, reliefs, and clay tablets that offer so much information about Persian life could be studied for the first time. Through archaeological remains, ancient texts, and work by a new generation of historians, a picture can today be built of this remarkable civilization and their capital city. Although the city had been destroyed, the legacy of the Persians survived, even as they mostly remain an enigma to the West and are not nearly as well understood as the Greeks, Romans, or Egyptians. In a sense, the Achaemenid Persian Empire holds some of the most enduring mysteries of ancient civilization. The Parthian people created an empire that lasted almost 500 years, from the mid-3rd century BCE until 224 CE, and it stretched from the Euphrates River in the west to Central Asia and the borders of Bactria in the east (Brosius 2010, 83). In fact, the expansive empire challenged the Romans on numerous occasions for supremacy in the Near East, created the first sustainable link between the peoples of Europe and East Asia, and followed a religion that many consider to be the oldest form of monotheism in the world; but despite these accomplishments the Parthians are often overlooked in favor of the Achaemenid and Sassanid Persians who came before and after them respectively, not to mention the Romans themselves. Although the Parthians may not get top billing in most popular histories of the period, they left an indelible mark on the world that cannot be overstated. During the first half of the 1st millennium CE, an empire arose in Persia that extended its power and influence to Mesopotamia in the east, Arabia in the south, the Caucasus Mountains in the north, and as far east as India. This empire, known alternatively as the Sasanian Empire or Sassanid Empire, was the last of three great dynasties in Persia—the Achaemenid and the Parthian being the first two dynasties—before the rise of Islam. In fact, many scholars consider the Sasanian Empire to be the last great empire of the ancient Near East because once it had been obliterated, Islam became the standard religion of the region, ushering in the Middle Ages.

©2017 Charles River Editors (P)2017 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Colin Fluxman
Length: 5 hrs and 44 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Life of Pelopidas

The Life of Pelopidas

Summary

Pelopidas started out a hero to the people, being born under a noble family and making a name for himself as an athlete. But as Plutarch describes in Pelopidas’ chapter of Parallel Lives, there was a lot more to this man than could be seen. Being very generous with his wealth to the less fortunate of the town, Pelopidas also went on to lead the army. By the end of his life, his patriotism did not go unnoticed - and was ultimately what led to his untimely demise.  

Public Domain (P)2018 Audio Sommelier

Narrator: Andrea Giordani
Length: 1 hr and 23 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Jurassic Period

The Jurassic Period

Summary

The early history of our planet covers such vast stretches of time that years, centuries, and even millennia become virtually meaningless. Instead, paleontologists and scientists who study geochronology divide time into periods and eras. The current view of science is that planet Earth is around 4.6 billion years old. The first four billion years of its development are known as the Precambrian period. For the first billion years or so, there was no life in Earth. Then, the first single-celled life-forms, early bacteria and algae, began to emerge. We don’t know where they came from or even if they originated on this planet, at all. This gradual development continued until around four billion years ago, when suddenly (in geological terms) more complex forms of life began to emerge. Scientists call this time of an explosion of new forms of life the Paleozoic Era, and it stretched from around 541 to 250 million years ago (Mya). First of all, in the oceans and then on land, new creatures and plants began to appear in bewildering variety. By the end of this period, life on Earth had exploded into a myriad of complex forms that filled virtually every habitat and niche available in the seas and on the planet’s only continent Pangea. Then, a mysterious event that became known to early paleontologists as “The Great Dying” wiped out more than 95 percent of all life on Earth. No one is entirely certain what caused this, but the effect of this cataclysm was as if someone had pressed a great cosmic “reset” button and it took 30 million years for the development of life on Earth to start again. The next period of Earth’s history is known as the Mesozoic Era, from about 252 to 66 Mya. This era is further divided into three periods - the Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous. During this era, one type of life came to dominate the planet more completely and for a longer period than had been seen before or since; this was the Age of Reptiles.  Beginning in the Triassic, but especially in the Jurassic period, reptiles came to dominate the oceans, land and even the skies. There has never been anything else quite like this period in terms of the success of a particular type of creature. For almost 200 million years, reptiles were the only significant creatures on Earth. They were so successful and so diverse that they evolved to take advantage of every available habitat and no other type of large creature had a chance to develop.  To put the 200 million years of reptile dominance in perspective, the entire span of recorded human history - the time since people advanced from tribes of primitive, nomadic hunter-gatherers into recognizable societies - covers less than 6,000 years. To put this in context, if the entire history of the planet were to be laid out on the length of a football field, the period of dominance of the age of reptiles would not begin until the five-yard line and would stretch for twelve feet. All of human history would occupy a tiny strip at the end of the field, less than the width of a human hair.  It was during the Jurassic period that reptiles began rule the Earth and some of the best-known prehistoric creatures first emerged. The Jurassic Period: The History and Legacy of the Geologic Era Most Associated with Dinosaurs looks at the development of the era, the extinction events that preceded it, and how life began to evolve during it. You will learn about the Jurassic Period like never before.

©2020 Charles River Editors (P)2020 Charles River Editors

Length: 1 hr and 48 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for La historia azteca [Aztec History]

La historia azteca [Aztec History]

Summary

¿Sabía usted que los aztecas sacrificaban entre 500 y 700 personas cada año para satisfacer a los dioses? Durante muchos años, los aztecas han capturado nuestra imaginación. Las historias de los invasores europeos originales combinadas con ruinas y leyendas únicas e impresionantes que hablan de palacios de oro crean una imagen de la sociedad azteca definida por la grandeza, la riqueza y el esplendor. Pero, ¿quiénes eran exactamente los aztecas? ¿De dónde vienen? ¿Cómo ascendieron para controlar una extensión tan amplia de tierra? Y si fueron tan poderosos, ¿cómo era posible que cayeran del poder y la dominación solo tres años después del primer contacto con los españoles? Estas son solo algunas de las preguntas que este nuevo audiolibro de historia fascinante pretende responder. En La historia azteca: Una guía fascinante sobre el imperio azteca, la mitología y la civilización descubrirá temas como: ¿Dónde vivían los aztecas? La verdad sobre quiénes eran realmente los aztecas Revelaciones importantes sobre el gobierno, ciudades-estado y la expansión La llegada de los españoles y la decadencia del imperio Un día en la vida de un ciudadano azteca El Soberano, los Dignatarios y los Nobles La agricultura y la dieta La religión Descubrimientos impactantes sobre el sacrificio humano ¡Y mucho, mucho más! ¡Obtenga este libro ahora para aprender más acerca de la historia azteca! Please note: This audiobook is in Spanish.

©2019 Captivating History (P)2019 Captivating History

Length: 2 hrs and 12 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Lost City of Mari

The Lost City of Mari

Summary

For a period of just under 100 years, the city of Mari in northern Mesopotamia (Eastern Syria) was one of the most - if not the most - important cities in the Near East. Mari was ruled by a dynasty of powerful Amorite kings who were not afraid to use their military power to keep subordinate provinces in line and their enemies at bay, but more often, they relied upon a combination of diplomacy and trade to establish their dominance. Founded by seminomadic Amorite tribes, Mari was gradually transformed over the span of centuries from a sleepy stop along the Euphrates River to the premier power in Near East during the early second millennium BCE. It remained a relatively obscure city for quite some time, overshadowed by more powerful dynasties and city-states in Akkad and Ur, until its kings took advantage of the collapse of the Ur III Dynasty and the return to the process of competing city-states that so often marked interregnum periods throughout ancient Mesopotamian history. If it were not for some very fortunate events and circumstances, the modern world might never have known about Mari. After Mari was conquered by Babylonian King Hammurabi, its cultural and political influence quickly diminished, until it was literally relegated to being a backwater on the Euphrates. As time went on, later rulers ignored the site, and it was eventually all but forgotten, so when modern scholars began deciphering and studying the enigmatic cuneiform script in the late 1800s and early 1900s, they noticed that though the city of Mari was mentioned in numerous important texts, no one knew where it was nor how big it was.  The city was finally discovered and excavated in the 1930s, and almost as soon as the first picks went into the soil, there was the realization that it was one of the most important sites of its time was made. When archaeologists uncovered one of the greatest caches of cuneiform documents from ancient Mesopotamia at the site of Mari, it instantly expanded modern scholarly knowledge, not just of the city, but of ancient Mesopotamia in the early second millennium BCE.  The “Mari Archives”, as they became known, brought the lost city to life, relating many different aspects of the city-state’s culture and what made it important and unique, as well as what made it similar to other Mesopotamian city-states of the era. The Mari archives ultimately showed the world that for a brief moment in history, there was no other city as important as Mari. The Lost City of Mari: The History and Legacy of an Ancient Mesopotamian Power Center chronicles the dramatic rise and fall of the mysterious city and why it was forgotten for so long.

©2020 Charles River Editors (P)2020 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Daniel Houle
Length: 1 hr and 36 mins
Available on Audible
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The Annals

Summary

The Annals, written by Gaius Cornelius Tacitus (56c-120 CE), is regarded as one of the great literary works of history in the Roman world. Tacitus is considered by many to be the greatest of Roman historians, and The Annals is his’ outstanding achievement.  Originally comprising 18 volumes, books 7 to 10 and parts of books 5, 6, 11 and 16 have been lost, but those that remain, read here by Martyn Swain, tell the fascinating tale of the Julio Claudian emperors and their times. Writing many years after their deaths, in the reign of the emperor Trajan, but still within living memory of his subjects, Tacitus describes the corrupting nature of Roman society with an analytical eye and a critical mind, seeking to present an accurate and considered view of the key events and characters of the preceding century.  Beyond the scope of any Hollywood epic, his canvas is vast, and he paints the picture of the incipient decline of Roman values and society following the death of the Divine Augustus. His descriptions of the lives and deaths of the Julio Claudian emperors (14-68 CE) paint portraits of some of the most monstrous and notorious individuals the world has ever seen: he describes the gradual moral decay and corruption of the hypocritical Tiberius; the weakness of the unfortunate Claudius and his infamous wives Messallina and Agrippina; and the unmitigated malignant evil of the despicable Nero.  Tacitus, who was also known as Publius Cornelius Tacitus, chronicles the intrigues and excesses of the rulers of empire as well as their overpowering pride and vanity within the setting of fabulous wealth, absolute power and a range of pernicious wickedness of unparalleled variety.  The Annals are remarkable as a work of literary accomplishment written by a master of rhetoric and have a poetic, tragic quality often focusing on the seemingly implacable nature of fate and the widespread bloodshed, disaster and doom so often unleashed by intransigent human greed and malevolence. John Jackson’s translation of The Annals chronicles a series of events filled with multiple examples of the limitless appetite for power, wealth and glory and the interplay between the rulers of the state, its populace, its institutions and its military. As well as detailing the conflicts, battles and conquests of the empire stretching from North Africa to Persia and from Palestine to Britain, Tacitus recounts fascinating details of insurrection, mutiny and rebellion in the armies of Rome; battles won and lost; storms at sea; shipwrecks; suicides; assassinations; torture; executions; murder by poison, rope and blade; incest and worse; and the commonplace of family members scheming, plotting, and killing each other to satisfy their lusts and achieve their ambitions.

Public Domain (P)2019 Ukemi Productions Ltd

Narrator: Martyn Swain
Author: Tacitus
Length: 17 hrs and 1 min
Available on Audible
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The Long Shadow of the Ancient Greek World

10 ratings

Summary

Immerse yourself in this comprehensive survey of ancient Greece from 750 to 323 B.C. - from the emergence of Greece at the end of the Dark Ages to the final disintegration of Greek autonomy through the Macedonian kings Philip II and Alexander the Great. These 48 riveting lectures tell the story of ancient Greek institutions and the people who molded them during the Archaic and Classical periods. Concentrating on the city-states of mainland Greece, with a special focus on Athens, Professor Worthington guides through some of history's most hard-fought struggles - from armed conflicts (such as the Persian Wars, the Peloponnesian War, and the campaigns of Alexander the Great) to political and social struggles (including the late 6th-century civil war in Athens that pitted nobles against the lower classes and eventually produced the first stirrings of democracy). As you explore innovative Athenian approaches to democracy, law, and empire, you discover how these approaches served as the bedrock for ideas and practices that you live with every day. You also encounter a wealth of intriguing links to many of our own contemporary institutions and attitudes about democracy, law, and empire. By the end of Professor Worthington's final captivating lecture, you discover that there was nothing inevitable about democracy, the Western concept of justice, or any of the other traditions and institutions that now play such central roles in the politics of the modern Western world. The story of how this tentative structure transformed into the firm foundation of our contemporary world is gripping, enlightening, and immensely rewarding.

©2009 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2009 The Great Courses

Narrator: Ian Worthington
Length: 25 hrs
Available on Audible
Cover art for Between the Rivers: The History of Ancient Mesopotamia

Between the Rivers: The History of Ancient Mesopotamia

18 ratings

Summary

All cultures lie in the shadow of ancient Mesopotamia-the land between the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers that is now mostly encompassed by the borders of modern Iraq. In this fascinating series of 36 lectures, an award-winning teacher leads you on a vivid journey through Mesopotamian history-from Neolithic times to the age of Alexander the Great-and into the lives of mighty emperors, struggling farmers, ambitious merchants, and palace servants to reveal why this ancient culture occupies such a foundational position in our history. The lectures look back to the time when the first cities arose in Mesopotamia and kings created complex bureaucracies to rule their expanding territories, thus fostering the invention of writing and other technologies. You peer into the lives and fortunes of Mesopotamia's people and learn about the birth of the urban lifestyle. Professor Castor creates a detailed image not only of larger Mesopotamian society but of life on the level of the individual Mesopotamian as well. Among the many fascinating insights into daily Mesopotamian life you examine are how they ate, worked, learned, worshiped, married, and reared children; used scientific ideas to help them order and understand the natural world; engaged with their powerful neighbors in Egypt, Syria, and Anatolia (modern-day Turkey); waged war and experienced peace; and endured the collapse of their cities. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2006 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2006 The Great Courses

Length: 18 hrs and 1 min
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Other Side of History: Daily Life in the Ancient World

The Other Side of History: Daily Life in the Ancient World

249 ratings

Summary

Look beyond the abstract dates and figures, kings and queens, and battles and wars that make up so many historical accounts. Over the course of 48 richly detailed lectures, Professor Garland covers the breadth and depth of human history from the perspective of the so-called ordinary people, from its earliest beginnings through the Middle Ages. The past truly comes alive as you take a series of imaginative leaps into the world of history's anonymous citizens, people such as a Greek soldier marching into battle in the front row of a phalanx; an Egyptian woman putting on makeup before attending an evening party with her husband; a Greek citizen relaxing at a drinking party with the likes of Socrates; a Roman slave captured in war and sent to work in the mines; and a Celtic monk scurrying away with the Book of Kells during a Viking invasion. Put yourself in the sandals of ordinary people and discover what it was like to be among history's 99%. What did these everyday people do for a living? What was their home like? What did they eat? What did they wear? What did they do to relax? What were their beliefs about marriage? Religion? The afterlife? This extraordinary journey takes you across space and time in an effort to be another person - someone with whom you might not think you have anything at all in common - and come away with an incredible sense of interconnectedness. You'll see the range of possibilities of what it means to be human, making this a journey very much worth taking. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2012 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2012 The Great Courses

Narrator: Robert Garland
Length: 24 hrs and 28 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Technological Advances in Metallurgy During the Bronze Age

Technological Advances in Metallurgy During the Bronze Age

Summary

Find out how metal working developed during the Bronze Age.  Find out what changes occurred and how methods and techniques developed in metal working.   The Bronze Age is defined by the three-age system dates from 2500 BC to 600 BC and originally provided a convenient chronology of the subdivision of technological advances. The period is important in that it sees the spread of the use of metals and witnesses the development of metallurgy techniques to make the most of these new resources.  

©2018 Troy Newton (P)2018 Troy Newton

Author: Troy Newton
Length: 13 mins
Available on Audible
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Turning Points in Medieval History

14 ratings

Summary

For an accurate picture of how the political, social, and religious structure of present-day Europe came to be - and even why we're speaking English today - studying the key events between the years 500 and 1500 is of critical import. These 24 gripping lectures deliver an unparalleled look at these moments that profoundly changed the arc of history, and they weave the era's vast array of disparate events into an interconnected tapestry that illuminates why nothing exists in a vacuum. Among the events you'll experience: the moment in 711 A.D. when Tariq ibn Zayid conquered Spain and created the unusually tolerant society of Al-Andalus; the 1152 marriage between Eleanor of Aquitaine and Henry Plantagenet, which led to the Hundred Years' War and the War of the Roses; and the composition of Fibonacci's Liber Abaci in 1202, which transformed the medieval world of business, banking, and commerce. These are just three of the many turning points in the history of medieval Europe that prove the Middle Ages were far from "dark." Throughout these lectures, you'll investigate events, such as the Norman conquest of England in 1066, where the impact was immediate and tangible. In others, like the Great Schism between the Eastern and Western churches, the importance was not recognized for years; some developments had effects so gradual that their significance can only be recognized from the vantage point of history. Methodical and meticulous in its approach to a labyrinthine age, these lectures will help you understand why the West's transition from the classical to the early modern was a fluid, ongoing process rather than the result of a single pivotal moment. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2012 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2012 The Great Courses

Length: 12 hrs and 11 mins
Available on Audible
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Norse Mythology

Summary

The Norse god Odin was a relentless seeker of knowledge and wisdom, willing to sacrifice almost anything for this pursuit. Odin’s hunger for wisdom is evident in many of the stories that involve him, and I invite you to share his willingness to let go of your reality and jump into the mysterious world of Norse Mythology. Norse Mythology presents a rich and complex collection of stories derived from Germanic roots.  A fascination with the history and life of the Norse is growing. Movies and television series about their way of life have surged in popularity. What makes it so fascinating is not the stories in themselves, although some are truly a feast to the eyes, but how they came to be and what they mean for the people that live by them.  Let’s drink from the well of knowledge and jump into a realm of wonder, where nothing is as it seems!  By the end of this book, you will be familiar with Norse Mythology and its ancient heritage of sagas, myths, and legends. You’ll discover who the Norse were, how they lived, and how they influenced the modern world. All this and much more including:   The Most Important & Powerful Gods & Goddess  Discover The Vikings - Facts & Myths The Legend of Sigurd The Dragon Hunter + Sigurd Runes The Dangerous Draugr Creatures That Killed Any Humans They Laid Eyes Upon How Freya’s Beauty Led to Mjolin’s Theft Thor The God of Thunder & The Story of How He Got His Hammer Ragnarok - All You Need to Know About the End of the World And much, much more.... Open a door to another world...a world of adventure, heroism, romance, and mystery. Norse Mythology. Your calling has been answered with this book.

©2020 Sofia Visconti (P)2021 Sofia Visconti

Narrator: Adrianne Moore
Length: 3 hrs and 18 mins
Available on Audible
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The Phoenicians

Summary

If you want to discover the captivating history of the Phoenicians, then pay attention...  The Phoenicians remain one of the most enigmatic ancient civilizations, with historians and scholars prone to speculation and educated guesses. Although many Greek, Roman, and Egyptian writers reference the Phoenicians in trade records, military battles, and artistic transactions, few records were left by the original Phoenicians themselves, leaving modern scholars to fill in the blanks through educated guesses and material culture. The ancient perception about this civilization was mixed. For every writer like Pomponius Mela who lavished praise upon the Phoenicians, there was another who derided the people as nothing more than cheats and hucksters who kept other states’ trade stymied through stranglehold networks and ridiculous deals.  In The Phoenicians: A Captivating Guide to the History of Phoenicia and the Impact Made by One of the Greatest Trading Civilizations of the Ancient World, you will discover chapters, such as: Origins The World of the Phoenicians Political and Legal Structures Daily Life Beauty and Apparel An Unwritten Early History Vassal to the Empires Trade and the Economy Language and Alphabet Religion Warfare Artistry in Multiple Mediums And much, much more! So, if you want to learn more about the Phoenicians, scroll up and click the "buy now" button!

©2019 Captivating History (P)2020 Captivating History

Length: 3 hrs and 1 min
Available on Audible
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Greek Mythology

Summary

Before science, there were myths. Today we see them as fiction, but in the past myths were a way to explain all the natural phenomena that surrounded mankind. History Academy’s brand-new book will tell you all about ancient Greek mythology. Let yourselves be amazed by the wonderful stories about gods and goddesses like Zeus and Athena, heroes like Perseus and monsters like Medusa. Every myth present in the book is supported by additional material regarding ancient Greeks’ history and culture to help our listeners understand the cultural background of the time. The book also includes a genealogical tree to clarify the relationships between the different characters. Greek Mythology is a modern collection of ancient Greek myths gathered by History Academy to let the new generations enjoy these ancient immortal tales. Every myth is full of adventures that will amaze both experienced listeners and occasional ones. This book is perfect for anyone who’s passionate about mythology and art and wishes to know more about myths like Pandora’s box or Prometheus’ theft of fire. Enjoy, dear listeners.

©2020 History Academy (P)2020 History Academy

Narrator: Leonard Grey
Length: 5 hrs and 42 mins
Available on Audible
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Ancient Greek Civilization

31 ratings

Summary

Clearly, the Greeks are a source of much that we esteem in our own culture: democracy, philosophy, tragedy, epic and lyric poetry, history-writing, our aesthetic sensibilities, ideals of athletic competition, and more. But what is it about Hellenic culture that has made generations of influential scholars and writers view it as the essential starting point for understanding the art and reflection that define the West? This series of 24 lectures by an accomplished Greek scholar and teacher traces the complex web of links between the present and its Mediterranean origins, taking you from the Late Bronze Age up to the time of Philip II of Macedon and his son Alexander the Great. It's an intellectual journey that lets you see ancient Greek civilization in the light shed by the newest and best research and criticism, expanding your understanding of history, literature, art, philosophy, religion, and more. With a special focus on the two crucial centuries from 600-400 B.C.-the era of the Persian and Peloponnesian wars and of classical Athens as described in the histories of Herodotus and Thucydides and the philosophic dialogues of Plato-you'll come to understand how the uniquely "Greek" identity was forged, and how it gave root to so much of what we consider vital about our own present day. Just as important, you'll learn how the differences between our own modern values and beliefs and those of the Hellenic world-including slavery and the exclusion of women from public life-do not imply a lack of relevance to our own times but can instead teach us as just much as our affinities. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©1998 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)1998 The Great Courses

Available on Audible
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Legion versus Phalanx

6 ratings

Summary

Taking a populist approach to a serious subject, Myke Cole combines a novelist's flair for drama with an ancient historian's eye for detail to create a unique book that delves into one of the most popular areas of the Ancient World. From the time of Ancient Sumeria, the heavy infantry phalanx dominated the battlefield. Armed with spears or pikes, standing shoulder to shoulder with shields interlocking, the men of the phalanx presented an impenetrable wall of wood and metal to the enemy. Until, that is, the Roman legion emerged to challenge them as masters of infantry battle. Covering the period in which the legion and phalanx clashed (280 - 168 BC), Myke Cole delves into their tactics, arms and equipment, organization and deployment. Drawing on original primary sources to examine six battles in which the legion fought the phalanx - Heraclea (280 BC), Asculum (279 BC), Beneventum (275 BC), Cynoscephalae (197 BC), Magnesia (190 BC), and Pydna (168 BC) - he shows how and why the Roman legion, with its flexible organization, versatile tactics and iron discipline, came to eclipse the hitherto untouchable Hellenistic phalanx and dominate the ancient battlefield. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.

©2018 Myke Cole (P)2018 Brilliance Publishing, Inc., all rights reserved.

Author: Myke Cole
Length: 8 hrs and 34 mins
Available on Audible
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The Age of Pericles

6 ratings

Summary

The career of Pericles, the leading Athenian politician and general from c. 450 to 429 B.C., is a prism through which to view the "Golden Age" of Greece, a brief but remarkable era when Athens experienced a cultural flowering of extraordinary power and importance for Western culture. In the generation that followed Pericles' appearance on the public stage shortly after the Persian wars, Athens rapidly transformed the alliance of Greek states - an alliance first created as a defense against the Persians - into a true Aegean empire, dominated by the Athenians and their mighty navy. But this dramatic increase in military power, cultural influence, and prestige was also accompanied by something unique: the growth of full participatory democracy. But in examining the lives of Athenian men and women, one has to ask what freedom and autonomy really meant to a society that relied on slaves and was ruthless in its treatment of its subjects. These 24 stimulating lectures present a well-rounded portrait of almost every aspect of Athenian life during the Golden Age, including. the different ways Athens and Sparta raised their children; the fate of Athenian girls as mothers and managers of the household; young Pericles' role in bringing Aeschylus's masterpiece, The Persians; why the Spartans rejected the aid of Athens in putting down a slave revolt; and Thucydides' terrifying description of the plague's physical and social impact on Athens - including the death of Pericles - and its possible role in the ultimate defeat of Athens by Sparta.

©2004 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2004 The Great Courses

Length: 12 hrs and 12 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Hannibal Barca: A Captivating Guide to the Carthaginian General Who Fought in the Second Punic War Between Carthage and Ancient Rome

Hannibal Barca: A Captivating Guide to the Carthaginian General Who Fought in the Second Punic War Between Carthage and Ancient Rome

Summary

If you want to discover the captivating life of Hannibal Barca, then pay attention... One of the names most synonymous with brilliant military strategy is Hannibal. He was the legendary Carthaginian general who marched elephants over the snowy Alps and took on Rome, the growing power in Europe at the time. He outsmarted the best strategists that Rome had to offer and twice sat in front of the gates of Rome with his army.  There was never any doubt that Hannibal would serve his country in the military, but no one could have predicted just how well he would serve Carthage. Even centuries later, Romans used the phrase “Hannibal’s at the gates!” as a way of indicating misfortune or fear. Even natural disasters were compared to him. His actions would go on to haunt the Romans for centuries. Because of the threat he had been to them, the Roman Republic was forced to learn how to outsmart their opponents and not just beat them. The actions of Hannibal helped to shape and form Rome into the military power that it became because they realized early on that they were not as safe as they had thought they were. In Hannibal Barca: A Captivating Guide to the Carthaginian General Who Fought in the Second Punic War Between Carthage and Ancient Rome, you will discover topics such as: Rome Versus Carthage - The First Punic War Born into an Uncertain World The Element of Surprise - The Beginning of a Legend Panic in Rome and the Subsequent Raiding of Roman Territory The Rivalry Between Hannibal and Fabius Defeating Hannibal Using Politics to Improve Carthage and a Final Betrayal Cat and Mouse with Rome - Roles Reversed Speculation on Hannibal’s End and the End of Carthage in the Third Punic War And much, much more... So if you want to learn more about Hannibal Barca, scroll up and click the "Add to Cart" button!

©2019 Captivating History (P)2019 Captivating History

Narrator: Jason Zenobia
Length: 3 hrs and 17 mins
Available on Audible
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The Maya (Ninth Edition)

Summary

The Maya has long been established as the best, most accessible introduction to the New World's greatest ancient civilization. Coe and Houston update this classic by distilling the latest scholarship for the general listener and student. This new edition incorporates the most recent archaeological and epigraphic research, which continues to proceed at a fast pace. Among the finest new discoveries are spectacular stucco sculptures at El Zotz and Holmul, which reveal surprising aspects of Maya royalty and the founding of dynasties. Dramatic refinements in our understanding of the pace of developments of the Maya civilization have led scholars to perceive a pattern of rapid bursts of building and political formation. Other finds include the discovery of the earliest known occupant of the region, the Hoyo Negro girl, recovered from an underwater cavern in the Yucatan peninsula, along with new evidence for the first architecture at Ceibal.

©1966, 1980, 1984, 1987, 1993, 1999, 2005, and 2011 Michael D. Coe; this edition copyright 2015 by Michael D. Coe and Stephen Houston (P)2020 Tantor

Narrator: Gary Tiedemann
Length: 10 hrs and 11 mins
Available on Audible
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Ancient Anatolia

Summary

If you want to discover the captivating history of ancient Anatolia, then pay attention.... What sparks curiosity about ancient Anatolia, which makes up most of modern-day Turkey, in the minds of history lovers is the diversity of its peoples throughout its territories and time. This audiobook seeks to present the most current view on the events that unfolded through the centuries of the Bronze and Iron Ages of Anatolia. The listener can follow the rise of some of the most famous empires in the world, as well as learn about the circumstances that led to their fall. From early settlements of nomadic tribes to the creation of vast empires, Anatolia changed its face numerous times throughout history. Not just territories and kingdoms changed, but the people inhabiting it also did so as well, in their language, culture, and religion. Even though they were faced with a lack of evidence for certain periods of ancient Anatolia, or for certain peoples, historians seek to accurately paint the picture of the lives in all the various kingdoms of Anatolia. This audiobook follows the Hittite Empire in its rise and fall. It discusses the Arameans and the influence of their culture on the civilized world, as well as the influence of the Luwians and their dispersion throughout Anatolia. Even if they were never able to organize a united Luwian Empire, they changed all the kingdoms they came in contact with. The effects of this ancient civilization can still be felt today as certain dialects of the Luwian language still exist in Anatolia. If you want to learn more about ancient Anatolia, buy this book today!

©2019 Captivating History (P)2020 Captivating History

Narrator: Jason Zenobia
Length: 4 hrs and 1 min
Available on Audible
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Classical Antiquity

Summary

If you want to discover the captivating history of classical antiquity, then pay attention.... From about the ninth to fifth centuries BCE, the population of Greece grew unprecedentedly large, expanding from about 800,000 people to as many as 13 million. About a quarter million of these lived in Athens. The average size of urban households during this period grew considerably, a fact that suggests that food was suddenly available in excesses sufficient to keep larger families healthy and alive much more effectively than just a millennium earlier. Bigger families meant bigger armies and larger communities that would eventually grow into the metropolises of Classical Greece. This incredible stretch of time is called classical antiquity, the age in which Western civilization first realized its potential and place in the world. The era brought on big changes for all the people of the Mediterranean. Thanks to new agricultural methods, seafaring technology, and trade, great civilizations sprang up around the sea, building large urban centers full of artists, merchants, political thinkers, scientists, and philosophers. As Greco-Roman culture grew, the relationships each city and realm had with one another also developed and changed. In Classical Antiquity: A Captivating Guide to Ancient Greece and Rome and How These Civilizations Influenced Europe, North Africa, and Western Asia, you will discover topics such as A blind poet from Ionia Athens, Greece Slavery The Golden Age of Athens Pericles at war The Socratic method Plato Alexander the Great The Hellenistic period From Greece to Rome The Roman Republic The gladiators Julius Caesar Remnants of classical antiquity And much, much more! So if you want to learn more about classical antiquity, listen to this audiobook!

©2019 Captivating History (P)2019 Captivating History

Length: 3 hrs and 8 mins
Available on Audible
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The History of the Byzantine Empire: From Its Glory to Its Downfall

Summary

The book covers the history of the Byzantine Empire from late antiquity until the Fall of Constantinople in 1453 AD. The author provides a comprehensive view of this great empire which was characterized by Orthodox Christianity, Greek culture and language, and Roman traditions.   Museum Audiobooks strives to present audiobook versions of authentic, unabridged historical texts from prior eras which contain a variety of points of view. The texts do not represent the views or opinions of Museum Audiobooks, and in certain cases may contain perspectives or language that is objectionable to the modern listener.

Public Domain (P)2019 Museum Audiobooks

Narrator: Andrea Giordani
Author: Charles Oman
Length: 9 hrs and 53 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Greece and Rome: An Integrated History of the Ancient Mediterranean

Greece and Rome: An Integrated History of the Ancient Mediterranean

13 ratings

Summary

Integrated approaches to teaching Greek and Roman history are a rarity in academia. Most scholars are historians of either Greek or Roman history and perform research solely in that specific field, an approach that author and award-winning Professor Robert Garland considers questionable. In these 36 passionate lectures, he provides an impressive and rare opportunity to understand the two dominant cultures of the ancient Mediterranean world in relation to one another - a relationship that has virtually no parallel in world history. He shows you how these two very different cultures intersected, coincided, and at times, collided. You'll discover the extraordinary culture that we call Greco-Roman: a unique fusion of civilizations that encompasses statecraft, mythology, language, philosophy, fine arts, architecture, science, and much else. Who were the Greeks and the Romans? How did they organize their societies? How did they interact? In this unique integrated historical approach, you'll see how Greece and Rome's relationship resembled a marriage: two distinct personalities competing in some areas, sharing in others, and sometimes creating a new synthesis of the two civilizations. And you'll consider their more substantive cultural differences, including religion, their views of foreigners, and their ways of thinking. You'll delight in the variety of sources - literature, archaeology, the visual arts, coinage, inscriptions - that Professor Garland draws upon to assemble a fascinating and complex picture of these two great civilizations. And you'll appreciate how he keeps Greece and Rome focused on how this material affects us today. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2008 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2008 The Great Courses

Narrator: Robert Garland
Length: 18 hrs and 51 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Persian Wars, Volume 2

The Persian Wars, Volume 2

Summary

Starting with Book Five, Volume 2 of The Persian Wars enters directly into the intrigues between the Greeks and Persians. Darius, infuriated with Athens because of her support for the liberation of the Ionian Greeks, initiates the first invasion of Greece, which ends with the Athenian victory at Marathon in 490 B.C. When Xerxes ascends the Persian throne a few years later, the war is resumed on a vastly greater scale. In some of the most wonderful prose of all time, Herodotus describes the events culminating in the naval battle of Salamis and the clash of armies at Plataea. Translation by George Rawlinson.

©2003 Audio Connoisseur

Author: Herodotus
Length: 14 hrs and 24 mins
Available on Audible
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Religion in the Ancient Mediterranean World

8 ratings

Summary

Step back to a time when the mysteries of the universe could seem overwhelming. Cycles of nature kept predictable time with the sun, the moon, and the stars, yet crops failed, disease struck, storms ravaged, and empires fell without warning. In the region surrounding the Mediterranean Sea, people responded to such tumult with a rich variety of religious beliefs. From these beliefs, we get some of Western civilization's most powerful texts: the Mesopotamian Epic of Gilgamesh, the Hebrew Bible, the Greek epics of Homer, Ovid's Metamorphoses, and the New Testament, among many others. Composed largely of stories of human interaction with the divine, these narratives gave ordinary people a window into the unfathomable realm of the sacred. Archaeological remains show that ancient peoples also responded with a complex array of religious rituals, and their temples, cultic statues, funerary goods, and household devotional items are among the world's greatest cultural treasures. Using such textual and archaeological evidence, these 48 marvelous lectures explore the religious cultures of the ancient Mediterranean world, from the earliest indications of human religious practices during prehistoric times to the conversion of the Roman Empire to Christianity in the 4th century of the Common Era. You'll discover the religious traditions of a wide range of civilizations, including the ancient kingdom of Egypt; ancient Mesopotamia; ancient Syria-Palestine, including Israel and Judah; Minoan civilization on the island of Crete and the successive civilizations of the Greek mainland; and the city of Rome, whose empire dominated the entire Mediterranean world at the end of the ancient era.

©2005 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2005 The Great Courses

Length: 24 hrs and 37 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Antigua Grecia [Ancient Greece]

Antigua Grecia [Ancient Greece]

Summary

Explora la fascinante historia de la Antigua Grecia La cultura y los acontecimientos que tuvieron lugar en Grecia fueron tan influyentes que tienen un efecto significativo en la población actual de todo el mundo. Los griegos antiguos crearon la democracia, un sistema político usado frecuentemente y considerado por muchos como la mejor forma de gobierno. Las grandes mentes de Grecia también hicieron increíbles y vitales descubrimientos, como el molino de agua, la geometría básica, y el uso de la medicina para curar enfermedades. Los filósofos de la antigua Grecia establecieron los cimientos de un nuevo campo de pensamiento y estudios. La antigua Grecia inauguró los juegos olímpicos, que aún se celebran regularmente. Figuras históricas particularmente famosas, tales como Alejandro Magno y Cleopatra, también tuvieron lazos con la antigua Grecia y jugaron un papel significativo durante su historia, a través del curso de guerras y la expansión del imperio. Debido a la influencia de la antigua Grecia, mientras aprendes sobre este periodo y lugar, aprenderás también sobre tu historia y sobre los orígenes de las personas, lugares e instituciones que probablemente estudias de manera regular en la escuela. Empezando en la Edad Oscura, este libro te guiará a lo largo de un emocionante viaje a través de la oscuridad, la democracia, el descubrimiento y el desarrollo de la civilización occidental. Algunos de los temas que se cubren en este libro incluyen:   El amanecer de la Edad Oscura De la Oscuridad a la Democracia Orígenes Olímpicos Grecia Crece de Guerra en Guerra La Lucha por la Democracia La Guerra del Peloponeso Entra Alejandro El Grande Grandes Mentes de la Antigua Grecia Roma Toma el Control Please note: This audiobook is in Spanish.

©2018 Captivating History (P)2018 Captivating History

Length: 2 hrs and 36 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Ancient Empires before Alexander

Ancient Empires before Alexander

19 ratings

Summary

Complete your knowledge of the ancient world with this comprehensive look at the dozen empires that flourished in the 2,000 years before the conquests of Alexander the Great. Over the course of 36 insightful lectures, you'll follow the Egyptians, the Mycenaean Greeks, the Persians, the Carthaginians, and others as they rise to glory, create administrative and military structures, clash with one another, and eventually collapse. Professor Dise immerses you in the political, administrative, and military details of these thrilling civilizations, analyzing three basic questions: How did this particular empire emerge? How was it governed and defended? How and why did it ultimately fall? These questions raise a host of profound issues on the growth, development, and failures of vast imperial systems. Grounded in a chronological approach, you'll find no better guide through the palatial halls, administrative offices, and war-torn battlefields of these empires than Professor Dise. Each lecture is packed with a range of rich sources on which our current understanding of the ancient Near East rests, including cuneiform tablets, colorful narratives, and archaeological remains. As you comb through these intriguing records, you quickly become more informed about how the past is recorded and passed down to subsequent generations. Spanning thousands of years of human history and encompassing regions both familiar and forgotten, this course is a remarkable tour through the farthest reaches of the ancient world - in all its marvelous diversity.

©2009 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2009 The Great Courses

Length: 18 hrs and 18 mins
Available on Audible
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Roman History, Volume 2

2 ratings

Summary

Volume Two of Dio Cassius brings to a close his sweeping historical work, Roman History. This volume begins with book 50 and the struggle between Octavian and Mark Antony. Octavian's victory is the beginning of the Principate and a new direction in Roman history. Dio takes a prolonged look at the reign of Augustus. He follows this with the history of the following emperors: Tiberius, Gaius (Caligula), Claudius, Nero, Galba, Otho, Vitellius, Vespasian, Titus, Domitian, Nerva, Trajan, Hadrian, Antoninus Pius, Lucius Verus, Marcus Aurelius, Commodus, Pertinax, Didius Julianus, Septimius Severus, Caracalla, Geta, Macrinus, Diadumenian, Elagabalus, and Alexander Severus. Much of our information about the emperors who followed Commodus is only available in the work of Dio Cassius. Please note that book 72 is no longer extant.

Public Domain (P)2017 Audio Connoisseur

Author: Dio Cassius
Length: 27 hrs and 43 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for A Statement with Regard to the Moorish Prince, Abduhl Rahhahman

A Statement with Regard to the Moorish Prince, Abduhl Rahhahman

Summary

Ibrahima Abdul Rahman or Abd al-Rahmana was born around 1762 in the African kingdom of Timbuktu, a region now part of Mali. At the age of 26, he was captured in an ambush, enslaved, and eventually transported to Mississippi, where he became a field worker on a cotton plantation. The manumission of Ibrahima and his wife Isabella was obtained prior to the publication of this 1828 work.

Public Domain (P)2018 Museum Audiobooks

Narrator: Hal Saunders
Length: 16 mins
Available on Audible
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Origins of Great Ancient Civilizations

9 ratings

Summary

Locales like Mesopotamia or the Indus Valley, peoples like the Hittites or Assyrians, or rulers like Sargon, Hammurabi, and Darius are part of a long-dead antiquity, so shrouded with dust that we might be tempted to skip over them entirely, preferring to race forward along history's timeline in search of the riches we know will be found in our studies of Greece and Rome. But, according to Professor Harl, these civilizations, "act as the cultural basis for many of the civilizations that will emerge on the Eurasian landmass and will dictate the destinies of many of the people living today on the globe." These remote, ancient civilizations stand behind the traditions of Greece, so it is critical to understand these great societies in order to better understand those that would come later - including our own. These 12 fast-paced lectures cover many civilizations that may only receive a few lines of cursory discussion in the average Western civilization textbook. Beginning in the Bronze Age and the emergence of urban-based literate civilizations, the story continues through the demise of Persia's great empire at the hands of the Greeks. Along the way, you'll examine advances such as the invention and evolution of writing, the development of vast empires dependent not only on military might but on laws and administration, the growth of trade, and the contributions of the Hebrews to the religious and ethical future of Western civilization. History lovers will appreciate this course for its deep insights and its rock-solid foundation for deeper exploration. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2005 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2005 The Great Courses

Narrator: Kenneth W. Harl
Length: 6 hrs
Available on Audible
Cover art for Roman Arches

Roman Arches

Summary

Some of the most iconic symbols of the Roman Empire that have survived into the modern world today are the arches that Romans erected to commemorate military victories and glorify individual emperors. The story of how arches came to be used throughout the Roman world in such a way is one that involves the evolution of the military and its leaders into the political forces that came to dominate the state, and those arches, along with the triumphs that came to be associated with many of them, were key parts in the process of exhibiting the might of Rome. At the same time, they were meant to mark the individual achievements of Rome’s rulers, making them an enormous and expensive PR exercise that steadily grew over the years.  At its most basic, and in its earliest incarnation, the arch was a celebration of achievement and, as such, was part of a whole series of methods used by the Romans to record, reward, and publicize success. However, as the imperial period progressed, the arch came to symbolize much more and became exclusively associated with imperial might through the building of triumphal arches. The story of those arches is inextricably linked to the promotion of Rome as the greatest of all powers, and of its leaders as the most worthy and able of all commanders.  Triumphal arches in Rome provided a centerpiece for triumphs that were restricted to the emperors and their immediate families after the establishment of the Roman Empire, but arches in the wider empire did not have this specific function. That said, as with those in Italy, foreign arches were strategically placed to ensure they were seen and passed through by the maximum number of people, subjecting them to scenes depicting Roman victories on a regular basis. These arches were inextricably linked to promoting Rome as the greatest of all powers, and also bound up in the policy of Romanization and assimilation of conquered territories and populations.  Of course, these arches have intrigued historians for years. Franz Botho Graef, a German classical archaeologist and art historian, a prominent expert in the area, devoted his life to the identification and cataloging of Roman arches. He documented 125 extant arches, and 30 further examples discerned from the literature or other sources, scattered throughout Rome and its provinces. Graef’s listing is usually taken as the starting point for subsequent researchers, but another eminent historian in the field, A. Frothingham, has disputed Graef´s listings, arguing that only 115 of the 125 identified arches actually existed. He also claimed to have identified 280 further “monuments and arches,” the majority of which were located within Asia Minor, North Africa, and Syria. However, this methodological approach introduced a new category - monuments - into the cataloging process, which has only served to complicate the debate.  The building process of arches was long and protracted, but it typically served the empire well. Indeed, the success of this physical statement can perhaps be best measured by the number of similar arches erected around the world centuries after the end of the Roman Empire, including the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, the Narva Triumphal Arch in Saint Petersburg, the Wellington Arch in London, and the India Gate in Delhi.  Roman Arches: The History of the Famous Monuments in Rome and Throughout the Roman Empire examines the events surrounding the celebrations, accounts of them, and how the arches influenced other architectural monuments. You will learn about Roman arches like never before.

©2020 Charles River Editors (P)2020 Charles River Editors

Length: 2 hrs and 24 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Histories

The Histories

2 ratings

Summary

Herodotus is not only the father of the art and the science of historical writing, but also one of the Western tradition's most compelling storytellers. In tales such as that of Gyges, who murders Candaules, the king of Lydia, and usurps his throne and his marriage bed, thereby bringing on, generations later, war with the Persians, Herodotus laid bare the intricate human entanglements at the core of great historical events. In his love for the stranger, more marvelous facts of the world, he infused his magnificent history with a continuous awareness of the mythic and the wonderful. For more than a hundred generations, his supple, lucid prose has drawn readers into his panoramic vision of the war between the Greek city-states and the great empire to the east. And in the generosity of his spirit, in the instinctive empiricism that took him searching over much of the known world for information, in the care he took with sources and historical evidence, in his freedom from intolerance and prejudice, he virtually defined the rational, humane spirit that is the enduring legacy of Greek civilization.

(P) Blackstone Audiobooks

Narrator: Bernard Mayes
Author: Herodotus
Length: 27 hrs and 49 mins
Available on Audible
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Decoding the Heavens

1 rating

Summary

In Decoding the Heavens, Jo Marchant tells for the first time the full story of the 100-year quest to decipher the ancient Greek computer known as the Antikythera Mechanism. Along the way she unearths a diverse cast of remarkable characters and explores the deep roots of modern technology in ancient Greece and the medieval European and Islamic worlds. At its heart, this is an epic adventure and mystery, a book that challenges our assumptions about technology through the ages.

©2009 Jo Marchant (P)2014 Audible, Inc.

Narrator: Julie Eickhoff
Author: Jo Marchant
Length: 8 hrs and 36 mins
Available on Audible
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Famous Romans

5 ratings

Summary

These 24 lectures retell the lives of the remarkable individuals - the statesmen, thinkers, warriors, and writers - who shaped the history of the Roman Empire and, by extension, our own history and culture.  Among the fascinating gallery of individuals whose lives, ideas, actions, and legacies you'll explore are Hannibal (who caused the Second Punic War personally, much as Adolf Hitler caused World War II), Augustus (who, beginning at the age of just 19, brilliantly followed a doctrine of ruthless expediency in order to rescue Rome from a century of civil war), and Marcus Aurelius (that most noble and philosophic of rulers who may have hastened the Empire's decline by tolerating the wicked cruelty of his heir).  Professor Fears divides his presentation into three "turning point" epochs in Roman history: Rome's war with Hannibal (the Second Punic War); Caesar and the end of the Roman Republic; and the imperial era between Augustus and Marcus Aurelius. As he presents the great figures of each period, he makes them seem personal and immediate. As you study these and many other significant Romans, you'll probe fundamental questions about the political and cultural history of Rome. What was the impact of Greek civilization on the Romans? Why did the Roman people, at the height of military, political, and economic power, abandon their republican liberty for the dictatorship of Caesar and his successors? What made the 2nd century A.D. one the most creative periods in world history? And why did the central figures of Roman history hold so much appeal for America's Founding Fathers? PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2001 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2001 The Great Courses

Narrator: J. Rufus Fears
Length: 12 hrs and 26 mins
Available on Audible
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Soldier of Rome

Summary

Rome's Vengeance. In the year A.D. 9, three Roman Legions under Quintilius Varus were betrayed by the Germanic war chief, Arminius, and destroyed in the forest known as Teutoburger Wald. Six years later, Rome is finally ready to unleash her vengeance on the barbarians. The Emperor Tiberius has sent his adopted son, Germanicus Caesar, into Germania with an army of 40,000 legionaries. They come not on a mission of conquest, but one of annihilation. With them is a young legionary named Artorius. For him the war is a personal vendetta; a chance to avenge his brother, who was killed in Teutoburger Wald. In Germania Arminius knows the Romans are coming. He realizes that the only way to fight the legions is through deceit, cunning, and plenty of well-placed brute force. In truth he is leery of Germanicus, knowing that he was trained to be a master of war by the Emperor himself. The entire Roman Empire held its collective breath as Germanicus and Arminius faced each other in what would become the most brutal and savage campaign the world had seen in a generation; a campaign that could only end in a holocaust of fire and blood.

©2006, 2012 James Mace (P)2014 James Mace

Narrator: Nigel Patterson
Author: James Mace
Length: 12 hrs and 47 mins
Available on Audible
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Basque Country

Summary

It would not be a stretch to say that for a very tiny geographical territory (just 20,747 square kilometers), the Basque Country has inspired a plethora of intense stereotypes. Some of these stereotypes have been cast upon its people from the outside, while others have been strategically propagated by the people themselves. For such a small area of land that is home to only 3,000,000 people, the Basque Country is anything but small in terms of its history, which is why opinions about its people are so intense, so consequential, and so contradictory. The Basque people have been called “the people who sing and dance at the foot of the Pyrenees”, a description that evokes not only their geographical location but also their strong folk traditions. Those words, said by the famous French writer Victor Hugo, infuriate the Basque people to this day. They have also been described pejoratively as “Europe’s aboriginals”, a reference to the age-old status of their culture, which has led many people to fetishize them and their language as ancient. In a much loftier vein, they also have been thought to be the “original” true European natives, the people who established the most prestigious, celebrated elements of European culture.  While such small-minded stereotypes rightly tend to antagonize the Basque people, many Basque nationalists have been eager to cultivate an image of their culture as unique and separate from Spain and from France, the larger nations that engulf its territory and that threaten its autonomy.  Basque nationalists are eager to point to the rich tradition of archeologists, politicians, anthropologists, nationalists and folklorists who have grown out of their culture. They have embraced their status as the oldest surviving European people, and they have celebrated their language, Euskera, as one of the world’s oldest spoken languages, a non-Indo-European tongue that can brag about having no other related languages in existence. At the same time, even as the Basque Country seems to be commonly used as a synonym for all that is old, it is important to keep in mind the fact that the Basques have long been at the avant-garde of European history and culture, not to mention trade.  During the wars against the Islamic caliphate during the Spanish Reconquista, the Basque kings often led the charge against the enemy. It was a Basque captain Juan Sebastian de Elcano, who first made a journey around the globe. Moreover, Bilbao - a major city in the Basque Country - is not only the birthplace of Basque nationalism, but also of Spanish socialism. Beyond politics, the Basque Country is responsible for the start of the industrial revolution in Spain, thanks to their iron mines. Add to that the fact that some of the best writers of Spanish literary history - Miguel de Unamuno and Pio Baroja - come from the Basque Country, not to mention the political legacy left by Henry III of Navarre who became Henry IV of France, and brought an era of religious peace to France through the Bourbon dynasty. Basque Country: The Turbulent History and Legacy of the Basque Autonomous Community in Spain looks at the region, the most important events there, and the ongoing political tensions.

©2020 Charles River Editors (P)2020 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Colin Fluxman
Length: 1 hr and 19 mins
Available on Audible
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A Macat Analysis of Thucydides' History of the Peloponnesian War

Summary

Thucydides' History of the Peloponnesian War is generally acknowledged as the first great work in the fields of both history and political theory. It uses a combination of narrative, debate, and analysis to document the war between Athens and Sparta (431-404 BC). But the importance of the work lies less in the story than in the way Thucydides tells it. History was the first major work of political inquiry that did not relate events to divine influences. It introduced instead a critical method of looking to the facts of human actions as the basis of our understanding - a method that continues to be used today, more than two millennia later. Many of the most important political thinkers in the Western tradition cite Thucydides as an influence, and major figures including Thomas Hobbes, David Hume, and Friedrich Nietzsche have praised his writing.

©2016 Macat Inc (P)2016 Macat Inc

Narrator: Macat.com
Author: Macat.com
Length: 1 hr and 42 mins
Available on Audible
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The Monarchy of England

2 ratings

Summary

This is the first of three volumes, which, taken together under the over-arching title of Monarchy, will form a new, ground-breaking history of England as told through the lives of its Kings and Queens. Volume one is an in-depth examination of how the English monarchy came into being, and how England became a nation state. It begins with Rome, the 'fount' from which all modern western European countries spring. The importance of the contrasting cultural and intellectual heritage of the Anglo-Saxons is underlined. Wessex, round which England coalesced in the ninth and tenth centuries, was a participatory society which balanced an effective monarchy at the centre with institutions of local governement which required - and got - the active involvement of most free men. It was this combination which enabled Wessex to survive and absorb the Viking invasions, and finally to thrive. Then came the crisis of the Norman invasion when, as one contemporary put it, 'God ordered that the English should cease to be people'. But - as David Starkey demonstrates - the English proved resilient, and within forty years of the battle of Hastings had conquered Normandy. The values and practices of Anglo-Saxon politics had triumphed and the English nation state had been reborn. This is popular history of the most exciting and challenging kind.

©2004 David Starkey (P)2004 Harper Collins UK

Length: 5 hrs and 15 mins
Available on Audible
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The Romans in Scotland

Summary

The Romans were master builders, and much of what they built has stood the test of time. Throughout their vast empire, they have left grand structures, from the Forum and Pantheon in Rome, to the theatres and hippodromes of North Africa, and the triumphal gates in Anatolia and France. Wherever they went, the Romans built imposing structures to show their power and ability, and one of their most impressive constructions was built on the northernmost fringe of the empire. Shortly after Emperor Hadrian came to power in the early second century CE, he decided to seal off Scotland from Roman Britain with an ambitious wall stretching from sea to sea. To accomplish this, the wall had to be built from the mouth of the River Tyne - where Newcastle stands today - 80 Roman miles (76 miles or 122 kilometers) west to Bowness-on-Solway. The sheer scale of the job still impresses people today, and Hadrian’s Wall has the advantage of being systematically studied and partially restored. Of course, the masterful architecture of the wall belied the fact that it was built for defense, because Scotland (known as Caledonia to the Romans) was never fully conquered or incorporated into the Roman Empire, a fact that many modern Scots remain quite proud of today. While the Romans made several efforts to subdue Scotland, it is not entirely clear whether their failure to complete the subjugation of the northern part of the British Isles was due to the ferocity of the Caledonian/Pictish tribesmen or whether the Romans simply came to the conclusion that the region had far too little to offer in the way of resources (either minerals, metals, or slaves) to warrant repeated major campaigns. Scotland in the first century CE had no settlements of any size, so profitable trade was not easy to establish, and so, did not offer any major motivation for military conquest.

©2020 Charles River Editors (P)2020 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Daniel Houle
Length: 2 hrs and 27 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Ancient Greece: From Beginning to End (Greek History, Ancient Greek, Aristotle, Socrates, Greece History, Plato, Alexander The Great, Macedonian)

Ancient Greece: From Beginning to End (Greek History, Ancient Greek, Aristotle, Socrates, Greece History, Plato, Alexander The Great, Macedonian)

Summary

The foundation of democracy; the genesis of the Olympic Games; the cradle of Western thinking; the inspiration of the Renaissance - the world owes Ancient Greece a lot more than one might think. Home to humanities greatest philosophers like Socrates, Aristotle, and Plato, this era is enriched with a wealth of fascinating events. Spanning over a period of seven centuries and reigning over large territories stretching as far as Southwest Asia and the entire Mediterranean, the kingdoms of Greece were able to imbue half the world with their beautiful culture, art, literature, and innovative thinking. Inside you will learn about:   The rise of Ancient Greece   Archaic Greece   Classical Greece   Hellenistic Greece   The fall of Ancient Greece   Ten little-known facts about Ancient Greece   This audiobook discusses each epoch of this electrifying era from beginning to end: The Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic periods, and the fall of Ancient Greece. Enriched with riveting details of the era, this audiobook will not only edify you but also keep you entranced.

©2015 Stephan Weaver (P)2018 Stephan Weaver

Narrator: Bridger Conklin
Length: 1 hr and 5 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Toltec Civilization: A History from Beginning to End

Toltec Civilization: A History from Beginning to End

Summary

Discover the remarkable history of the Toltecs. The Toltecs are one of the most mysterious and little understood of all the ancient cultures of Mesoamerica. This culture was venerated by later civilizations, such as the Aztecs. Even today, “Toltec knowledge” is used as a kind of shorthand for arcane wisdom from an ancient culture.  However, discussing the actual history of the Toltecs is extremely difficult. Much of what we know of these people comes from writings and oral traditions of the Aztecs, as translated and interpreted by the European invaders. This Aztec history is so mingled with myth and legend that it is very difficult to discern what may be historical facts. In the 19th and 20th centuries, most historians seemed to accept that the Toltecs were a distinct and warlike culture centered around the Valley of Mexico and who conquered large parts of Mesoamerica. More recently, there has been debate about whether the Toltecs really were a separate culture at all or whether this term should be taken to represent a set of shared ideas and beliefs which permeated many cultures in Mesoamerica around the end of the first millennium. Even now, much of the information about the Toltecs is vague, contradictory, and subject to debate. This is the mysterious, baffling, and ever-changing story of the Toltecs. Discover a plethora of chapters, such as:  Origins of the Toltecs The Place of the Reeds Toltec Society and the Cult of Quetzalcoatl The Toltecs and the Maya Decline and Fall And much more! So, if you want a concise and informative book on the Toltecs, simply scroll up and click the "buy now" button for instant access!

©2020 Hourly History (P)2020 Hourly History

Narrator: Mike Nelson
Length: 1 hr and 9 mins
Available on Audible
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Greek Mythology

Summary

Greek myths and legends have inspired men and women around the world for hundreds of years. The stories of Apollo, Perseus, Achilles, and others have sustained the imaginations of old and young alike, even into the present. In fact, characters of Greek myth and legend have found their way into mainstream culture in the form of popular television and film characters. Greek mythology was so influential that even formed the basis of Roman myth. In Greek Mythology: Fascinating Myths and Legends of Greek Gods, Heroes, and Monsters, you will be exposed to the exciting tales of gods and heroes that formed the canon of the ancient Greek religion.  Greek myth has become a part of us in ways that we do not fully appreciate. In fact, heroes like Achilles, Heracles, and Perseus have helped to form the image that we have today of the hero. The basis for much of the philosophy and dramatic arts that characterize western society today has its root in ancient Greek culture, which was closely tied to and spurred on by Greek myth and legend. The ancient Greeks used the tales of their gods and heroes to help understand their world and their own place in it. In Greek Mythology: Fascinating Myths and Legends of Greek Gods, Heroes, and Monsters, you will learn about all the gods and heroes by reading the formative myths of the Greeks.  Greek Mythology: Fascinating Myths and Legends of Greek Gods, Heroes, and Monsters explore the Greek gods and the Ancient Greek legends by delving into the tales told by Greek and Roman poets and historians, including Homer. They told tales about the creation of the universe, how the Titans were the first gods before the Olympians, and how the Titans and Olympians went to war with one another. Because the Ancient Greek religion was demonstrated in these tales about their gods and heroes, learning about these figures in the form of stories allows the reader to understand who the Ancient Greeks were and why they were.  The world of Ancient Greek legend was very different from our own. The people at the heart of Ancient Greek civilization - living in modern-day Greece, Italy, Turkey, and other places - these people were part of a culture so far removed from the way that we think and perceive today as to be almost unrecognizable to us. Greek Mythology: Fascinating Myths and Legends of Greek Gods, Heroes and Monsters give you the lens you need to understand, even beginning with a description of the world they lived in and a summary of their history through the major historical periods.  In Greek Mythology: Fascinating Myths and Legends of Greek Gods, Heroes, and Monsters, you will learn everything there is to learn about Greek myth and legend. You will learn about the Titans and Olympians, the monsters, who the major gods and goddesses were, who some of the important heroes were, and how ancient Greek legend has a legacy that continues among us today. Poets and dramatists like Homer, Hesiod, Euripides, Sophocles, and Aeschylus recorded Greek stories in a form that has allowed them to be read and appreciated today. In Greek Mythology: Fascinating Myths and Legends of Greek Gods, Heroes, and Monsters, you will learn some of these tales including: Pandora's Box Jason and the Argonauts The Courtship of Leda The Tale of Arachne The Sacrifice of Iphigenia at Aulis Heracles and His Twelve Labors The Judgment of Paris The Trojan War

©2019 Neil Matt Hamilton (P)2019 Neil Matt Hamilton

Narrator: Robin Nixon
Length: 3 hrs and 30 mins
Available on Audible
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Flat Earth and Hollow Earth Theories

Summary

The world is filled with mysteries, and even in the modern age, much of the planet remains unexplored. The depths of the oceans and the intricate and extensive cave systems that honeycomb some parts of the Earth are still largely unknown. Thus, it should come as no surprise that when it comes to this terra incognita, people have projected all sorts of ideas. Tales of sunken cities or lost civilizations are just some of the fanciful theories, and those could even be considered tame in comparison to the idea that Earth is flat and/or hollow.   Despite this notion being rejected by the scientific community for millennia, and despite the fact that geology, volcanology, oceanography, and physics have all proven that the planet is not flat, the idea of a hollow Earth continues to intrigue people and gain eager and sincere adherents. This is made all the more remarkable by the fact that space programs are more than 60 years old, and people can fly around the world on planes in a matter of hours.   Taken at face value, the ideas are patently ridiculous, but they provoke strong emotions in some people, sincere people who have thought extensively about their beliefs. These people feel they are privy to a hidden truth, and that the rest of the world is wrong and ignorant, but this feeling of mental superiority isn’t the only appeal in clinging to radical notions. There is also the thrill of adventure, the feeling that one is part of a dangerous minority attempting to overthrow the dominant paradigm. It is far better, some would feel, to live in a world full of mystery and hope than a decaying, “rational” world where everything can be explained but nothing solved.  Flat Earth and Hollow Earth Theories: A History of Strange Tales and Bizarre Beliefs About the Planet offers a sampling of the many strange stories and theories regarding the planet’s surface and interior.

©2019 Charles River Editors (P)2019 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Jim Johnston
Length: 2 hrs and 30 mins
Available on Audible
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Germania

2 ratings

Summary

In Germania, Roman historian Tacitus presents an impressive history of Germanic tribes and their societies. He dives deep, discussing everything from their ancestry to their government. The work also explores the similarities and differences between the values and customs of Roman and Germanic societies. Germania is a monumental ethnographic work that provides fascinating insight into early Germanic cultures and Roman attitudes toward them.

Public Domain (P)2018 Museum Audiobooks

Available on Audible
Cover art for Writing and Civilization: From Ancient Worlds to Modernity

Writing and Civilization: From Ancient Worlds to Modernity

2 ratings

Summary

At just over 5,000 years old, writing is actually a relatively recent invention. It has become so central to the way we communicate and live, however, that it often seems as if writing has always existed. But the question remains: Who invented writing, and why? In these 24 fascinating lectures, you'll trace the remarkable saga of the invention and evolution of "visible speech," from its earliest origins to its future in the digital age. Your guide is an accomplished professor and epigrapher who whisks you around the globe to explore how an array of sophisticated writing systems developed, then were adopted and adapted by surrounding cultures. Along the way, you'll visit the great early civilizations of Egypt, Mesopotamia, China, Japan, and the Americas, and you'll see how deciphering ancient scripts is a little like cracking secret codes - only far more difficult. You'll be spellbound as you hear accounts of the breathtaking moments when the decipherment of ancient scripts broke centuries of silence. And you'll marvel at fascinating objects once shrouded in mystery, including the iconic Rosetta stone. Writing and Civilization offers the chance to not only discover the history of ancient writing systems, but also the rare opportunity to actually hear those scripts read aloud and to learn the meaning of their messages hidden in plain sight.

©2013 The Great Courses (P)2013 The Teaching Company, LLC

Narrator: Marc Zender
Length: 12 hrs and 10 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Ancient Black Hebrews Vol III: The Genetic Evidence

The Ancient Black Hebrews Vol III: The Genetic Evidence

Summary

This audiobook is part of a 4 volume series. In this volume Muller explains in plain language how genetic evidence proves the ancient Israelites were black. There is also a section devoted to the Lemba Jews of Africa whose authenticity has recently come under attack. Muller defends the Lemba evidence admirably. Every black person should listen to this audiobook! PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.

©2018 Gert Muller (P)2019 Gert Muller

Narrator: Dave Wright
Author: Gert Muller
Length: 1 hr and 53 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Historia de Roma [History of Rome]

Historia de Roma [History of Rome]

Summary

3 manuscritos completos en 1 libro  La República Romana: Una Fascinante Guía del Ascenso y la Caída de la República Romana, SPQR, y los Políticos Romanos, como Julio César y Cicerón (Libro en Español/The Roman Republic Spanish Book) El Imperio Romano: Una Guía Fascinante sobre el Ascenso y la Caída del Imperio Romano que incluye las historias de Emperadores como Augusto Octavio, Trajano, y Claudio (Libro en Español/Roman Empire) El Imperio bizantino: Una guía fascinante de Bizancio y cómo el Imperio romano del este fue gobernado por emperadores como Constantino el Grande y Justiniano La primera parte de este libro incluye:  Los Comienzos de la República Logros Militares de los Comienzos de la República: Tomar Italia El Ascenso y la Caída de Julio César y el Fin de la República Romana Segunda parte de este libro, usted:  De la República al Imperio: El Ascenso de Octavio La Era de Augusto Los Dos Imperios: Este y Oeste ¡Todo esto y mucho más que no puedes perderte! Tercera parte de este libro, usted: Explorar una historia de poder y gloria, anarquía y orden, paganismo y cristianismo, guerra y paz, Occidente y Oriente Familiarizarse con las raíces de las grandes controversias que definieron la historia de Europa y la totalidad de la civilización occidental: el conflicto entre las iglesias católica y ortodoxa, y el que existe entre el cristianismo y el islam Descubrir historias de emperadores extraordinarios de los que nunca ha oído hablar y de la asombrosa valentía de héroes grecorromanos como Constantino Dragases, que resistió a los otomanos hasta el final, y Belisario, que luchó contra los persas para reconquistar lo que solía ser el Imperio Occidental ¡Obtenga este libro ahora para aprender más sobre el Historia de Roma! Please note: This audiobook is in Spanish.

©2020 Captivating History (P)2020 Captivating History

Length: 6 hrs and 56 mins
Available on Audible
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The Maya

Summary

The Maya forged one of the greatest societies in the history of the ancient Americas and in all of human history. Long before contact with Europeans, Maya communities built spectacular cities with large, well-fed large populations. They mastered the visual arts, and developed a sophisticated writing system that recorded extraordinary knowledge in calendrics, mathematics, and astronomy.  The Maya achieved all this without area-wide centralized control. There was never a single, unified Maya state or empire, but always numerous, evolving ethnic groups speaking dozens of distinct Mayan languages. The people we call "Maya" never thought of themselves as such; yet something definable, unique, and endlessly fascinating-what we call Maya culture-has clearly existed for millennia. So what was their self-identity and how did Maya civilization come to be "invented?" With the Maya historically subdivided and misunderstood in so many ways, the pursuit of what made them "the Maya" is all the more important. In this Very Short Introduction, Restall and Solari explore the themes of Maya identity, city-state political culture, art and architecture, the Maya concept of the cosmos, and the Maya experience of contact with including invasion by outsiders.

©2020 Oxford University Press (P)2020 Tantor

Narrator: Tim Campbell
Length: 3 hrs and 20 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Millennium

Millennium

4 ratings

Summary

Of all the civilisations existing in the year 1000, that of Western Europe seemed the unlikeliest candidate for future greatness. Compared to the glittering empires of Byzantium or Islam, the splintered kingdoms on the edge of the Atlantic appeared impoverished, fearful and backward.  But the anarchy of these years proved to be not the portents of the end of the world, as many Christians had dreaded, but rather the birth pangs of a radically new order.   Millennium is a stunning panoramic account of the two centuries on either side of the apocalyptic year 1000. This was the age of Canute, William the Conqueror and Pope Gregory VII, of Vikings, monks and serfs, of the earliest castles and the invention of knighthood, and of the primal conflict between church and state. The story of how the distinctive culture of Europe - restless, creative and dynamic - was forged from out of the convulsions of these extraordinary times is as fascinating and as momentous as any in history.

©2008 Tom Holland (P)2019 Hachette Audio UK

Author: Tom Holland
Length: 17 hrs and 32 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Annals

The Annals

Summary

Here is a lively new translation of Cornelius Tacitus's timeless history of three of Rome's most memorable emperors.  Tacitus, who condemns the depravity of these rulers, which he saw as proof of the corrupting force of absolute power, writes caustically of the brutal and lecherous Tiberius, the weak and cuckolded Claudius, and "the artist" Nero. In particular, his gripping account of the bloody reigns of Tiberius and Nero brims with plots, murder, poisoning, suicide, uprisings, death, and destruction.  The Annals also provides a vivid account of the violent suppression of the revolt led by Boudicca in Britain, the great fire of Rome under Nero, and the subsequent bloody persecution of the Christians.

©2008 J. C. Yardley (translation); Introduction copyright 2008 by Anthony A. Barrett (P)2020 Tantor

Available on Audible
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The Roman Republic

Summary

“Rome was a poem pressed into service as a city”. In that short line, Anatole Broyard, a 20th century American writer, compactly captures the timeless and enchanting beauty that resides within the Eternal City of Rome. The ambitious and fearless emperors that built the legendary Roman Empire from scratch, the broad-shouldered and bronzed gladiators with their iconic plume helmets and glinting swords, and elaborate parties attended by toga-wearing Romans fueled by alcohol, violence, orgies, and other godless acts all paint a picture of Roman life. Indeed, many people are well-versed with these unique scenes of Roman history, but few are familiar with the equally riveting years preceding the dawn of the Roman Republic, and even less people are acquainted with the fabled Seven Hills sitting east of the Tiber River - the core geographical components of Rome, and the very foundations that the Eternal City was built on. The study of Roman history is usually divided into three distinct phases: the time of the Kings, the Roman Republic, and the Roman Empire. Roman tradition dated the foundation of Rome to 753 BCE, and this first period of its history ended with the overthrow of King Tarquinius Superbus in 510 BCE. There is very little remaining historical evidence pertaining to this period, so much of what is known is at best legend, possibly based on varying degrees of historical fact. The period of the Roman Republic, generally dated from 509-27 BCE, is an entirely different matter. There is significant documentation that enables historians to analyze how Rome cemented its position within the Italian peninsula before pushing ever outward to create the new provinces that formed the core of the vast Roman Empire in the third phase that came to dominate all of Europe for so long. The period of the Republic saw those with the emerging powers having to grapple with new political situations, the administration of a diverse domain while contending with political disorder at home, commercial and financial expansion, and complex issues of land distribution, the role of the military, new ideas in religion, and the emergence of new class systems. These years were certainly vibrant and laid the foundations of such characteristics as Roman discipline and the ability to adapt, as well as witnessing the formation of its political structure. The unique farmer-soldier society evolved to the extent that a few Roman citizens were able to dominate their world and time. It was not a tranquil era, but it was one in which those interested in new ideas and philosophies could thrive, and in which the conflicts between the aspirations of the great Roman philosophers and the pragmatically minded senior political and military figures drove the formation of the Roman state and provided the bedrock for its success.

©2019 Charles River Editors (P)2019 Charles River Editors

Narrator:
Length: 3 hrs and 9 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Assyrian Empire: A History from Beginning to End

Assyrian Empire: A History from Beginning to End

Summary

Discover the remarkable history of the Assyrian Empire... The Assyrian Empire was the largest, most powerful, and longest-lasting in the ancient world. It included lands that comprise modern-day Egypt, Syria, Iraq, Israel, Lebanon, Palestine, Kuwait, Jordan, Bahrain, and Cyprus, as well as large parts of modern Saudi Arabia, Libya, Turkey, and Iran.  The Assyrian army was the most effective, most highly trained, and best equipped in the ancient world, and few nations dared to stand against it. This force was used with ruthless brutality by Assyrian kings to ensure that potential foes were terrified of losing a battle with the Assyrians. There wasn’t just one Assyrian empire; there were three. Each rose, seized lands in the ancient Near East, and then declined to insignificance. It was only the third empire, the Neo-Assyrian empire, that finally attained the full size and scope which previous rulers had attempted. Yet, the very size of the empire was part of what eventually led to its downfall.  Internal dissent and civil wars weakened the empire to the point that it was not able to exercise effective control over the lands it had conquered. When this point arrived, the Assyrian Empire collapsed and disintegrated with bewildering speed.  This is the story of the rise and fall of the three Assyrian Empires. Discover a plethora of chapters, such as: The City of Ashur The Old Kingdom The Warrior Society The Late Bronze Age Collapse The Fall of the Assyrian Empire And much more! So, if you want a concise and informative book on the Assyrian Empire, simply scroll up and click the "buy now" button for instant access!

©2019 Hourly History (P)2020 Hourly History

Length: 1 hr and 8 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Denisovans

The Denisovans

1 rating

Summary

The study of paleoanthropology is the branch of anthropology that examines the development of humans and pre-humans - often called collectively hominins - through history. Although paleoanthropology is directly concerned with human history, it diverges from traditional historical studies in that historians use historical records as their primary sources to reconstruct history, while paleoanthropologists work with bones and other artifacts hominins left as their records. Historians deal with the last 5,000 years of human history, while paleoanthropologists go back more than four million years to when the first proto-humans walked the Earth. Although the subject of paleoanthropology covers a much longer chronology than historical studies, the study itself is actually fairly new. As soon as man discovered writing, he began engaging in historiography (historical writing and philosophy), but paleoanthropology only really began in the late 1800s. As archaeologists began finding bones in European caves of a human race that was very different than any race in the modern world, the study of paleoanthropology was born. The race of those early humans who were found in the European caves were later termed Neanderthals, and for quite some time, they were believed to have been the race from which many modern humans were directly descended. Over time, the remains of more hominin races were discovered, leading many scholars to postulate a definite evolutionary line from proto-humans to modern humans, but at the same time, it seemed more questions were raised. Many anthropologists began questioning if the Neanderthals were direct ancestors of modern humans, and now, most believe that they were not, although scholars grant that they were closely related, and many modern humans do indeed carry some Neanderthal genetics. This debate was unsettled until recently, when new scientific knowledge and methods were utilized to answer some of the most important questions pertaining to early human and pre-human development. Advances in genetic testing have allowed the field of paleoanthropology to make great leaps, one of the greatest was when the remains of five individuals discovered in a Siberian cave had their DNA sequenced in 2010. However, the results of the DNA testing dramatically changed the course of paleoanthropology once more when it was revealed that although the hominins from what is known as the Denisova Cave were closely related to Neanderthals, much more so than modern humans are related to Neanderthals, they represented a distinct species of humans. Scholars began examining this new hominin race - which became known as “Denisovans”, “Denisovan Man”, or Homo denisovan - for connections to the Neanderthals and modern humans.  Although it has been less than 10 years since the Denisovans were truly discovered, much has been learned about them, particularly about their interactions with the Neanderthals and modern humans, their range, and their culture. It has been revealed that although the Denisovans were very similar to the Neanderthals in terms of genetics, phenotype, and material culture, the Denisovans possibly had a much wider range and left a bigger genetic imprint on modern human populations.  The Denisovans: The History of the Extinct Archaic Humans Who Spread Across Asia During the Paleolithic Era looks at the evolution of these mysterious humans and examines the theories regarding their history.

©2020 Charles River Editors (P)2020 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Daniel Houle
Length: 2 hrs and 21 mins
Available on Audible
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Sparta

Summary

If you want to discover the captivating history of Sparta, then keep reading... Four captivating manuscripts in this audiobook: Spartans: A Captivating Guide to the Fierce Warriors of Ancient Greece, Including Spartan Military Tactics, the Battle of Thermopylae, How Sparta Was Ruled, and More The Greco-Persian Wars: A Captivating Guide to the Conflicts Between the Achaemenid Empire and the Greek City-States, Including the Battle of Marathon, Thermopylae, Salamis, Plataea, and More The Battle of Thermopylae: A Captivating Guide to One of the Greatest Battles in Ancient History Between the Spartans and Persians The Peloponnesian War: A Captivating Guide to the Ancient Greek War Between the Two Leading City-States in Ancient Greece - Athens and Sparta Some of the topics covered in part one of this audiobook include: Who Were the Spartans Spartan Government, Military, and Society And much, much more! Some of the topics covered in part two of this audiobook include: On the Eve of War The Interwar Years: Greece and Persia Prepare to Meet Again The Invasion of Xerxes Part 1: The Battles of Thermopylae and Artemisium The Invasion of Xerxes Part 2: The Battles of Salamis and Plataea The Delian League Wars The Aftermath of the War The Greek Military The Persian Military And much, much more! Some of the topics covered in part three of this audiobook include: Leading up to the Battle of Thermopylae After the Battle of Thermopylae The Greek and Persian Armies And much, much more! Some of the topics covered in part four of this audiobook include: Understanding Peloponnese The Peloponnesian and Delian Leagues And much, much more! Get this audiobook now to learn more about Sparta!

©2020 Captivating History (P)2020 Captivating History

Length: 10 hrs and 14 mins
Available on Audible
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Assyria

1 rating

Summary

Assyria was a Mesopotamian kingdom which became a brutal empire of the ancient Near East and the Levant. This encyclopaedic text covers the lay of the land, the capital, and other cities, plus the language, cuneiform writing, customs, religion, arts, and architecture of Assyria. The city state of Ashur dates back to about the 25th century BCE. The history deals with the Assyrian conquests of Anatolia, Babylonia, the Iranian plateau, and the Levant, until it suffered a series of defeats at the hand of the Medes, Persians, and Babylonians. The empire finally collapsed between 612 and 609 BCE.

Public Domain (P)2018 Museum Audiobooks

Narrator: Laura Orlando
Length: 20 hrs and 50 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Persian Empire

The Persian Empire

61 ratings

Summary

For the past 2,500 years, we've heard about the Persian Empire as a decadent civilization run by despots, the villains who lost the Battle of Marathon and supplied the fodder for bad guys in literature and film. But it turns out this image is inaccurate. As recent scholarship shows, the Persian Empire was arguably the world's first global power- a diverse, multicultural empire with flourishing businesses and people on the move. The key is to look at the Persian Empire from the Persian's perspective. Over the span of 24 fascinating lectures, you'll take on the role of a history detective to discover the truth about this grand civilization. You'll discover the key to the empire's success lay in its greatest rulers, each of whom played a critical role in shaping and strengthening a civilization we still remember today. But while the great kings were administering justice or waging wars, everyday Persians were just as important to the success of the empire. You'll also learn about the empire's efficient communications network; the Persian economy and the workers and entrepreneurs who supported it; the role of women in the empire, especially the influence of royal women; and the daily cultural exchanges between the diverse peoples of the empire. Professor Lee shows you a whole new history of the ancient world - a perspective largely unknown even by students of history. These lectures capture the people, the strength, the rise and the downfall of this great empire, revealing the complexity behind centuries of a previously one-sided history. Take this opportunity to complete your understanding of the ancient world and discover the humanity of the ancient Persians. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2012 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2012 The Great Courses

Narrator: John W. Lee
Length: 11 hrs and 59 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Soldier of Rome: Heir to Rebellion

Soldier of Rome: Heir to Rebellion

Summary

A year has passed since the end of the Gallic rebellion of Sacrovir and Florus. Retribution has been exacted, and the province is at peace once more. And yet, there are some who escaped Rome's justice. They are led by a man whose heart burns with hate; an heir to rebellion. Knowing that there can be no victory against the legions, his vengeance can only be wrought through terror and murder. The Gallic city of Lugdunum will be the first to taste his wrath. The city of Lugdunum flourishes; the Twentieth Legion's Third Cohort having been stationed within the city since the end of the Sacrovir Revolt. For Centurion Proculus and his legionaries, their comfortable assignment will soon come unraveled as a series of grisly murders looks to upset the order of the city. Sergeant Artorius inadvertently finds himself at the center of the search to find these mysterious killers before they undermine the city's faith in the protection of the legions - a search that will lead him on a journey into the darkest corners of what lurks in a broken man's wicked soul.

©2008, 2012 James M. Mace (P)2018 James M. Mace

Narrator: Nigel Patterson
Author: James Mace
Length: 9 hrs and 43 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Incas: A Captivating Guide to the History of the Inca Empire and Civilization

Incas: A Captivating Guide to the History of the Inca Empire and Civilization

2 ratings

Summary

Explore the captivating history of the Incas! One of the most notable ancient cultures of South America is undoubtedly the Inca civilization. They once ruled over the largest empire in South America. Not only that - their empire was also the largest in the world at the time. There are many mysteries surrounding the Incas. Where did the Incas originate? And how did they come to rule over their vast empire that incorporated mountaintops, tropical jungles, and coastal lands? What were the most notable achievements of their great kings? What did their temples and monuments look like, especially the capital city of Cuzco and their breathtaking mountaintop settlement at Machu Picchu in modern-day Peru? Some of the topics and questions covered in this audiobook include:   How the Incas recorded their history The Inca creation myth The founding of the great city of Cuzco The first dynasty of Inca rulers and their greatest deeds The second dynasty of Inca rulers and their greatest deeds The rise of the Inca empire: a cosmological event? Social order in the Inca society The different roles of women in the Inca society Inca religious order and ideology Tour of the greatest Inca sights From Pachacuti to the arrival of the Spanish The Spanish Conquest The aftermath and the Inca legacy And a great deal more that you don't want to miss out on! Get the audiobook now and learn more about the Incas.

©2018 Captivating History (P)2018 Captivating History

Narrator: Duke Holm
Length: 2 hrs and 8 mins
Available on Audible
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Rome and the Mediterranean Vol. 1

4 ratings

Summary

Polybius says that he wrote his Histories "to find out by what means and by what political system the entire world was brought under the domination of Rome..." And as he states, it was an event totally without precedent. Within the short space of about 50 years Rome went from being a provincial leader of an Italian confederacy to become the Mistress of the Mediterranean: Caput Mundi. "Surely there can be no one so shallow or so apathetic of character that he has no desire to know how and under what type of government the Romans were able in less than fifty-three years to bring under their control almost the whole of the civilized world, a passage of events which is unique to history." Indeed. And who better to write such a history than the brilliant Polybius? Polybius was one of the first historians to attempt to present history as a sequence of causes and effects, based upon a careful examination of tradition and a keen scrutiny of the facts. Of all ancient historians, only Thucydides is considered the greater. Tragically, much of The Histories has been lost. But what remains is singularly dramatic and crucially important. It was Polybius who first made Rome's struggle with Hannibal comprehensible to scholars and later generations of historians. He is still our primary source for information about Hannibal and the events of the first half of the second century B.C. Livy used him as a source, as did Plutarch. And although much is missing, much remains: a review of the First Punic War, a detailed description of the Second Punic War, comparisons of the characters of Scipio and Hannibal, comparisons of the Greek phalanx to the Roman legion, a study of the Roman constitution, the dazzling intrigues of the Hellenistic monarchies, and much more. Volume 1 begins with a review of events leading up to Hannibal's invasion of Italy. The amazing account of Hannibal's crossing of the Alps is one of the highlights of this volume. Volume 1 ends with Hannibal...

©2008 Public Domain (P)2008 Audio Connoisseur

Author: Polybius
Length: 10 hrs and 24 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Roman Way

The Roman Way

Summary

Edith Hamilton shows us Rome through the eyes of the Romans. Plautus and Terence, Cicero and Caesar, Catullus, Horace, Virgil, and Augustus come to life in their ambitions, their work, their loves and hates. In them we see reflected a picture of Roman life very different from that fixed in our minds through schoolroom days, and far livelier. The Roman Way makes vividly interesting the contrast between Roman and Greek culture. Moreover, it reveals how surprisingly similar Roman civilization was to that of modern America, in respects ranging from an interest in good roads and good plumbing, to the popular veneration of home and mother. Our heritage from Rome includes everything from moral laws to stock characters in the drama. Skillful, witty, subtle in understanding, this audiobook shows us what the Romans were like, how they lived, what they thought, and what they accomplished.

©1932 W.W. Norton & Company, Inc. (P)1994 Blackstone Audiobooks

Narrator: Nadia May
Length: 6 hrs and 40 mins
Available on Audible
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Treasures of Celtic Mythology

Summary

Enter The World Of Mythology! Enter a world where gods and goddesses mingle with the supernatural beings of the Tuatha de Danaan, where heroes fight epic battles and monsters are thwarted, and where legendary tales are told with an eye toward eternal glory - the treasure that is Celtic mythology is an undeniable pleasure to listen to. Explore another world of ancient times, never to be forgotten. The motifs of Celtic legends are similar to that of many other mythologies: Magic is a handy way to explain the extraordinary; heroes are larger-than-life, with superhuman strength and wisdom to spare; gods are tricky and should be approached with caution; harrowing journeys are undertaken; romance is dramatic, often tragic; battles are fought and champions are forged. The Celts were the victims of internecine battles and foreign conquests, yet their legacy survives with a long-standing oral tradition that, eventually, was written down. We can see the Celtic evolution from warring tribes to triumphant kingdoms to Christian converts through the thread of a treasure trove of myths and tales. This book can take you through that journey, beginning with an overview of the Celtic people and cultures and into an understanding of their pantheon of gods and goddesses, their amazing tales of adventure and sometimes sacrifice, and a glimpse into who they actually were via the stories they held dear. Some specific elements you will encounter:  Some of the main gods of the Celtic pantheon, with all their quirks and foibles The beauty of the Tuatha de Danaan and their supernatural realm The wily ways in which Celtic myths survive foreign invasions and new religions One of the greatest heroes in all of Celtic mythology - Cuchulainn The contribution of the Welsh to the set of Celtic tales Early medieval romance and its tragically fated nature Fellowship between warriors and knights - before Tolkien! The evil of the Fomorian hordes, invaders, and monsters The development of courtly tales and Arthurian legends - the inheritors of ancient Celtic mythology A glimpse into all of the myriad ways that Celtic culture and its mythology still yet influence our world today Celtic mythology is diverse and fascinating, offering us an insight into how ancient people believed and lived, into what they valued and vilified, and into how they loved and thrived. Finally, if you have enjoyed these treasured tales of Celtic mythology, don't forget to explore the other fantastic realms of mythological magic in this series of books: Treasures of Egyptian Mythology, Treasures of Norse Mythology, Treasures of Roman Mythology, and Treasures of Greek Mythology. You will find yourself in awe of the sweeping scope of history and culture represented by these mythological traditions - as well as obtain a better understanding of how we continually make and re-make these myths for our own times. That's the fabulous thing about myths: They never truly die.

©2019 Bluesource and Friends (P)2019 Bluesource and Friends

Narrator: Laura Witten
Length: 2 hrs and 33 mins
Available on Audible
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The Echo of Greece

1 rating

Summary

"Fourth-century Athens has a special claim on our attention," writes the author, "apart from the great men it produced, for it is the prelude to the end of Greece....The kind of events that took place in the great free government of the ancient world may, by reason of unchanging human nature, be repeated in the modern world. The course that Athens followed can be to us not only a record of old unhappy far-off things but a blueprint of what may happen again." With the clarity and grace for which she is admired, Edith Hamilton writes of Plato and Aristotle, of Demosthenes and Alexander the Great, of the much-loved playwright Menander, of the Stoics, and finally of Plutarch. She brings these figures vividly to life, not only placing them in relation to their own times but also conveying very poignantly their meaning for our world today.

©1957 W.W. Norton & Company, Inc. (P)1994 Blackstone Audiobooks

Narrator: Nadia May
Length: 4 hrs and 40 mins
Available on Audible
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Ancient Mediterranean Civilizations

Summary

If you want to discover the captivating history of ancient Mediterranean civilizations, then pay attention.... Five captivating manuscripts in one audiobook:  Carthage: A Captivating Guide to the Carthaginian Empire and Its Conflicts with the Ancient Greek City-States and the Roman Republic in the Sicilian Wars and Punic Wars Minoans: A Captivating Guide to an Essential Bronze Age Society in Ancient Greece Called the Minoan Civilization The Phoenicians: A Captivating Guide to the History of Phoenicia and the Impact Made by One of the Greatest Trading Civilizations of the Ancient World The Mycenaeans: A Captivating Guide to the First Advanced Civilization in Ancient Greece The Etruscans: A Captivating Guide to the Etruscan Civilization of Ancient Italy That Preceded the Roman Republic The first part of the book is about Carthage and here are some of the topics covered:  From allies to enemies The Punic civilization And much, much more! The second part of the book is about the Minoans and here are some of the topics included:  Where and when did the Minoans live? Architecture Theories about the collapse of civilization And much, much more! The third part of the book is about the Phoenicians and here are some of the topics covered: Origins The world of the phoenicians Political and legal structures And much, much more! The fourth part of the book is about the Mycenaeans and here are some of the topics included:  Political and military organization Culture and daily life And much, much more! The fifth part of the book is about the Etruscans and here are some of the topics included:  Politics, government, and social structure And much, much more! Get this audiobook now to learn more!

©2020 Captivating History (P)2020 Captivating History

Length: 12 hrs and 55 mins
Available on Audible
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The Oracle of Delphi

Summary

"Not often nor regularly, but occasionally and fortuitously, the room in which they seat the god's consultants is filled with a fragrance and breeze, as if the adyton were sending forth the essences of the sweetest and most expensive perfumes from a spring." - Plutarch "[T]he seat of the oracle is a cavern hollowed down in the depths... from which arises pneuma [breath, vapor, gas] that inspires a divine state of possession." - Strabo, Geography 9.3.5 The Oracle of Delphi was one of the greatest religious institutions in Ancient Greece. It played a significant role not only in the formation and collective decisions of Hellenic localities and city-states but also in the personal lives of Greeks known and unknown. The site was dedicated to the god Apollo, and the Greeks believed the god spoke his oracles through his prophetess known as the Pythia. The judgments and decisions rendered by the oracle were so important to the Greeks that they often put them above all other interests, even security threats posed by the likes of the Persians. Delphi was popular even amongst outsiders. The Pythia delivered the god's oracles to such famous persons as Midas and Croesus, and it provided consultations during such important historical moments as the Persian War and the Peloponnesian War. Many authors of antiquity mention the oracle for one reason or another, and there even survive epigraphic collections that preserve the god's words on stone. The ancient Greeks called Delphi the omphalos ("navel") of the Earth. The black rock that symbolized this imagined center stands at the site to this very day. Sitting at the foot of Mt. Parnassos, Delphi overlooks the Gulf of Corinth, so it is no wonder why the setting mesmerized contemporaries.

©2012 Charles River Editors (P)2015 Charles River Editors

Length: 1 hr and 9 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Mesopotamia: A Captivating Guide to Ancient Mesopotamian History and Civilizations, Including the Sumerians and Sumerian Mythology, Gilgamesh, Ur, Assyrians, Babylon, Hammurabi and the Persian Empire

Mesopotamia: A Captivating Guide to Ancient Mesopotamian History and Civilizations, Including the Sumerians and Sumerian Mythology, Gilgamesh, Ur, Assyrians, Babylon, Hammurabi and the Persian Empire

2 ratings

Summary

If you want to discover the remarkable history of Mesopotamia, then pay attention...  Seven captivating manuscripts in one audiobook:  Sumerians: A Captivating Guide to Ancient Sumerian History, Sumerian Mythology and the Mesopotamian Empire of the Sumer Civilization Gilgamesh: A Captivating Guide to Gilgamesh the King and the Epic of Gilgamesh Ur: A Captivating Guide to One of the Most Important Sumerian City-States in Ancient Mesopotamia Assyrian History: A Captivating Guide to the Assyrians and Their Powerful Empire in Ancient Mesopotamia Babylon: A Captivating Guide to the Kingdom in Ancient Mesopotamia, Starting from the Akkadian Empire to the Battle of Opis Against Persia, Including Babylonian Mythology and the Legacy of Babylonia Hammurabi: A Captivating Guide to the Sixth King of the First Babylonian Dynasty, Including the Code of Hammurabi The Persian Empire: A Captivating Guide to the History of Persia, Starting from the Ancient Achaemenid, Parthian, and Sassanian Empires to the Safavid, Afsharid, and Qajar Dynasties Taken together, the civilizations of Sumer, Assyria, and Persia have helped form the modern makeup of Mesopotamia, western Asia, and the world. However, to really understand why things are the way they are, it’s important to break up this historical timeline and spend some time learning about each society. Only by doing this will you be able to fully appreciate the powerful impact these ancient peoples had on our modern world.   So if you want to learn more about Mesopotamia, scroll up and click the "add to cart" button!  PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio. 

©2019 Captivating History (P)2019 Captivating History

Length: 21 hrs and 33 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Cretaceous Period

The Cretaceous Period

Summary

Scientists have long attempted to understand Earth’s past, and in service to that effort, they have divided the world’s history into eons, eras, periods, epochs, and ages. For example, the current eon is called the Phanerozoic Eon, which means “visible life”. This is the eon in which multicellular life has evolved and thrived. Before this, life was microscopic (single cells). The Phanerozoic eon is divided into three eras - Paleozoic (“old life”), Mesozoic (“middle life”), and Cenozoic (“new life”). The Mesozoic era is divided into three periods - Triassic, Jurassic, and Cretaceous. Before the Triassic, primitive life had built up in the oceans and seas, and some lifeforms finally had crawled onto land during the Paleozoic era. With that, life had become well-established, but then came the Permian-Triassic mass extinction, the worst extinction event in the history of the planet. At the end of the Triassic, another extinction event cleared the way for dinosaurs to become the dominant set of species in the Jurassic. Though the Triassic does not have as interesting a list of creatures as those in the Jurassic and Cretaceous - such as Tyrannosaurus rex, Stegosaurus, Pterodactyls, Brontosaurus, and the like - the life which reclaimed the Earth and then thrived during this period was no less important. Life during the Triassic spent nearly 60 percent of its time recovering from the Permian-Triassic extinction event, roughly 30 million years. What had been built up was then slammed by nature, effectively clearing the board once more for new species to take over. The Jurassic is best known, thanks to the series of dinosaur movies featuring its name, but the famous extinction of the dinosaurs took place during the Cretaceous. One of the problems of discussing the ancient history of the Earth is the unimaginably long spans of time involved. People tend to think of human history as old, but compared to other periods of the evolution of the planet, humans have been around for no more than the blink of an eye. Anatomically, modern people have been around for about 200,000 years, and while that may sound like a long time, it can be put in context if the whole history of the planet, from the time that it was first formed until the present day, covered a period of 24 hours. In that timescale, modern humans first appeared a little after 23:59:59, less than one second before midnight, and recorded human history - the point from when people first started writing things down - started less than 6,000 years ago. Despite people’s current ability to impact the planet and denude its resources, they represent a tiny blip in the history of the Earth, though the understanding of this is a relatively recent phenomenon. For much of recorded history, people imagined that human history and the history of the planet were pretty much the same thing. It was assumed that people had always been the dominant life on Earth. Early societies were aware of fossils, but they had no conception of just how old they were; the ancient Chinese, for example, classified many fossils as the bones of dragons. It wasn’t until 1822 that a new word “paleontology” was coined, and it was used to describe the emerging science of using the fossil record to understand what the world was like in the far distant past. Gradually, a better understanding emerged of the different periods through which the Earth had passed and a realization that for hundreds of millions of years, it wasn’t humans, but a very different species that ruled the Earth.

©2020 Charles River Editors (P)2020 Charles River Editors

Length: 1 hr and 42 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Books of I & II Kings: A Commentary

The Books of I & II Kings: A Commentary

Summary

I and II Kings provide a record of Israel's history from the beginning of the movement to place Solomon on David's throne through the end of the reign of Zedekiah, Judah's last king. There are great lessons to be learned from Israel's desire to be "like those around us" and its consequences.

©2003 Koinonia House (P)2019 Koinonia House

Narrator: Chuck Missler
Length: 15 hrs
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Triassic Period

The Triassic Period

Summary

Scientists have long attempted to understand Earth’s past, and in service to that effort, they have divided the world’s history into eons, eras, periods, epochs, and ages. For example, the current eon is called the Phanerozoic, which means “visible life”. This is the eon in which multi-cellular life has evolved and thrived. Before this, life was microscopic (single cell). The Phanerozoic eon is divided into 3 eras - Paleozoic (“old life”), Mesozoic (“middle life”) and Cenozoic (“new life”). From there, the Mesozoic era is divided into 3 periods - Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous. Before the Triassic, primitive life had built up in the oceans and seas, and some lifeforms finally had crawled onto land during the Paleozoic era. With that, life had become well established, but then came the Permian-Triassic mass extinction, the worst extinction event in the history of the planet. At the end of the Triassic, another extinction event cleared the way for dinosaurs to become the dominant set of species in the Jurassic. Though the Triassic does not have as interesting a list of creatures as those in the Jurassic and Cretaceous, such as Tyranosaurus rex, Stegosaurus, Pterodactyls, Brontosaurus, and the like, the life which reclaimed the Earth and then thrived during this period was no less important. Life during the Triassic spent nearly 60 percent of its time recovering from the Permian-Triassic extinction event, roughly 30 million years. What had been built up was then slammed by nature, effectively clearing the board once more for new species to take over. The Triassic Period: The History and Legacy of the Geologic Era that Witnessed the Rise of Dinosaurs looks at the development of the era, the extinction events that preceded it, and how dinosaurs began to evolve in the Late Triassic. You will learn about the Triassic Period like never before.

©2019 Charles River Editors (P)2019 Charles River Editors

Narrator:
Length: 1 hr and 11 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The March of the Ten Thousand

The March of the Ten Thousand

18 ratings

Summary

Translated by W. E. D. Rouse, The March of the Ten Thousand is one of the most admired and widely read pieces of ancient literature to come down to us. Xenophon employs a very simple, straightforward style to describe what is probably the most exciting military adventure ever undertaken. When Cyrus, brother to the Great King of Persia, attempts to overthrow his feckless sibling in 401 B.C., he employs a Greek mercenary army of 10,000 hoplites as the core of his rebellious force. Xenophon, who seeks the advice of Socrates before joining, is among the common soldiers. Inexorably, Cyrus and his huge army march southward 1,500 miles from the coast of Ionia all the way to Babylon, and there give battle to Artaxerxes, the Great King. Although the battle is soon decided in favor of Cyrus, the would-be usurper is killed while in pursuit of the king. Meanwhile, the Greeks are victorious on their part of the battlefield and await the return of Cyrus and his instructions. By the next morning, they realize that Cyrus is dead and that his allies have melted away in the night, leaving them alone trapped behind enemy lines within a few miles of the Persian capital. And only a few miles distant lies an enormous Persian army with vengeance in mind. Despair deepens when the Greek officer corps is treacherously murdered during peace talks. Alone, leaderless and hopelessly outnumbered, the Greeks nevertheless elect new officers. Xenophon steps into the pages of history with his magnificent rallying speeches and selfless acts of courage. Follow one of history's most spirited bands of soldiers as they fight and maneuver their way through 1,500 miles of hostile territory seething with adversaries. It is an epic of courage, faith and democratic principle.

Copyright © Audio Connoisseur 2003

Author: Xenophon
Length: 7 hrs and 32 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Map of Knowledge

The Map of Knowledge

1 rating

Summary

“The Map of Knowledge is an endlessly fascinating book, rich in detail, capacious and humane in vision.” (Stephen Greenblatt, author of The Swerve: How the World Became Modern, winner of the Pulitzer Prize) 

After the Fall of Rome, when many of the great ideas of the ancient world were lost to the ravages of the Dark Ages, three crucial manuscripts passed hand to hand through seven Mediterranean cities and survived to fuel the revival of the Renaissance - an exciting debut history. 

The foundations of modern knowledge - philosophy, math, astronomy, geography - were laid by the Greeks, whose ideas were written on scrolls and stored in libraries across the Mediterranean and beyond. But as the vast Roman Empire disintegrated, so did appreciation of these precious texts. Christianity cast a shadow over so-called pagan thought, books were burned, and the library of Alexandria, the greatest repository of classical knowledge, was destroyed. 

Yet some texts did survive and The Map of Knowledge explores the role played by seven cities around the Mediterranean - rare centers of knowledge in a dark world, where scholars supported by enlightened heads of state collected, translated, and shared manuscripts. In 8th century Baghdad, Arab discoveries augmented Greek learning. Exchange within the thriving Muslim world brought that knowledge to Cordoba, Spain. Toledo became a famous center of translation from Arabic into Latin, a portal through which Greek and Arab ideas reached Western Europe. Salerno, on the Italian coast, was the great center of medical studies, and Sicily, ancient colony of the Greeks, was one of the few places in the West to retain contact with Greek culture and language. Scholars in these cities helped classical ideas make their way to Venice in the 15th century, where printers thrived and the Renaissance took root. 

The Map of Knowledge follows three key texts - Euclid's Elements, Ptolemy's The Almagest, and Galen's writings on medicine - on a perilous journey driven by insatiable curiosity about the world. 

“A lovely debut from a gifted young author. Violet Moller brings to life the ways in which knowledge reached us from antiquity to the present day in a book that is as delightful as it is readable.” (Peter Frankopan, author of The Silk Roads) 

“A sumptuous, glittering, endlessly fascinating book, written with passion, verve, and humor.” (Catherine Nixey, author of The Darkening Age)

©2019 Violet Moller (P)2019 Random House Audio

Narrator: Susan Duerden
Length: 8 hrs and 46 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Great Tours: Greece and Turkey, from Athens to Istanbul

Great Tours: Greece and Turkey, from Athens to Istanbul

Summary

The shimmering turquoise waters and lost worlds of the Aegean await you. Grab your travel hat and join us for a unique cultural journey to the dramatic landscapes of Greece and Turkey - to dazzling ancient cities, majestic empires, and magical treasures of history.  This is a land of gods and heroes. Here great myths came to life and epic battles were fought, and the wondrous remains of ancient civilizations still call to you from across the centuries.  In The Great Tours: Greece and Turkey, from Athens to Istanbul, award-winning Professor John R. Hale of the University of Louisville is your guide to the fabulous civilizations of the Greeks, Romans, Byzantines, and Ottomans, and to the natural wonders and idyllic landscapes that surround them.  These 24 richly enjoyable lectures give you the chance to experience these important sites and cultures through the eyes of an expert archaeologist and scholar, whose knowledge and depth of insight go far beyond any ordinary travel narrative. In each site, you explore the critical history and culture that defined it and the ways in which it influenced our modern world. These lectures offer both a rich resource for travelers preparing to visit these distant lands and a multilevel cultural journey that can be enjoyed just as well from the comfort of home.  PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio. 

©2011 The Great Courses (P)2011 The Teaching Company, LLC

Narrator: John R. Hale
Length: 12 hrs and 24 mins
Available on Audible
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Julius Caesar - The Biography

Summary

There were three great European nations in ancient days, each of which furnished history with a hero: the Greeks, the Carthaginians, and the Romans. The Roman hero was Caesar. He was born just one hundred years before the Christian era. His renown does not depend, like that of Alexander, on foreign conquests, nor, like that of Hannibal, on the terrible energy of his aggressions upon foreign foes, but upon his protracted and dreadful contests with, and ultimate triumphs over, his rivals and competitors at home. When he appeared upon the stage, the Roman empire already included nearly all of the world that was worth possessing. There were no more conquests to be made. Caesar did, indeed, enlarge, in some degree, the boundaries of the empire; but the main question in his day was: Who should possess the power which preceding conquerors had acquired....

©2020 La Gazza Edizioni (P)2020 La Gazza Edizioni

Author: Jacob Abbott
Length: 5 hrs and 5 mins
Available on Audible
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The Byzantine Army

Summary

It would be hard if not outright impossible to overstate the impact Roman Emperor Constantine I had on the history of Christianity, Ancient Rome, and Europe as a whole. Best known as Constantine the Great, the kind of moniker only earned by rulers who have distinguished themselves in battle and conquest, Constantine remains an influential and controversial figure to this day. He achieved enduring fame by being the first Roman emperor to personally convert to Christianity, and for his notorious Edict of Milan, the imperial decree which legalized the worship of Christ and promoted religious freedom throughout the Empire. More than 1500 years after Constantine’s death, Abdu'l-Bahá, the head of the Bahá'í Faith, wrote, “His blessed name shines out across the dawn of history like the morning star, and his rank and fame among the world's noblest and most highly civilized is still on the tongues of Christians of all denominations” The Byzantine Army: The History and Legacy of the Byzantine Empire’s Military during the Middle Ages examines the history of the Byzantine military machine, why it was so successful, and why, in the end, it failed to preserve a civilization that had lasted a thousand years.

©2019 Charles River Editors (P)2019 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Colin Fluxman
Length: 3 hrs and 13 mins
Available on Audible
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Powerful Women Who Ruled the Ancient World

Summary

What is power and who is allowed to wield it? Why is female power so rare and, often, so feared? What can the women who gained power in the ancient world teach us about the contemporary world and our modern ideas of gender, authority, and equality? Listeners will explore these and other questions as you travel back to the ancient world and uncover the stories of remarkable women who overcame a host of barriers to wield power in a male-dominated world. From Egypt and Mesopotamia to China and Rome, you will meet women who worked strategically to gain unprecedented influence and you will see how their stories echo through the centuries, offering surprising relevance to our understanding of gender and sexual dynamics today.  In Powerful Women of the Ancient World, Professor Kara Cooney will share the stories of women who rose to power through ambition; intelligence; skill; and sheer determination. First, you will take a look at what power actually is - how it is defined, how different kinds of power operate, and why women and men are often viewed differently when power is involved. Then, meet the women of the ancient world who challenged the status quo by grasping for and holding authority. Some names listeners will likely already recognize through their “cautionary tales”, such as Cleopatra and Jezebel. Others, though less well-known, will show you the different ways it is possible to be powerful. You will meet rulers like Empress Lü of China and Hatshepsut of Egypt, rebel leaders such as Boudica of Britain, religious leaders like the Hebrew prophetess Deborah, and more.  As listeners will learn, times may have changed since antiquity, but the past has a long reach - and in many ways, our cultural ideas about women and power are surprisingly slow to change.

©2020 Audible Originals, LLC (P)2020 Audible Originals, LLC.

Narrator: Kara Cooney
Length: 5 hrs and 45 mins
Available on Audible
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Treasures of Greek Mythology

Summary

Unlock your Greek treasure box! Enter a world where gods and goddesses mingle with the humans that worship them in elaborate temples, where heroes fight epic battles and monsters are thwarted, where legendary tales are told with an eye toward eternal glory: The treasure that is Greek mythology is an undeniable pleasure to listen. Explore another world of ancient values, virtues, and vices - never to be forgotten. The motifs of Greek mythology are similar to that of many other mythologies: Supernatural power is a handy way to explain the extraordinary; heroes are larger-than-life, with superhuman strength and wisdom to spare; gods are tricky and should be approached with caution; harrowing journeys are undertaken; battles are fought, and champions are forged. The Greeks developed a highly sophisticated government and developed both the Western epic and the philosophical tradition; their influence is undeniable still yet today. We can see the Greek evolution from their legendary founding, to their epic expansion, to their continued presence in our popular imagination through the thread of their treasure trove of myths and tales. This audiobook can take you through that journey, beginning with an overview of the Greek peoples and cultures, and into an understanding of their pantheon of gods and goddesses, their amazing tales of adventure, restless search for meaning, and a glimpse into who they actually were via the stories they held dear. Some specific elements you will encounter include: Some of the main gods of the Greco-Roman pantheon, with all their quirks and foibles The Greek Council of Twelve Gods and their all-too-human role in the peoples they oversee The first epic tales that have defined Western literary culture for thousands of years The multiple myths surrounding the gods, their heroes, and their foes The unique philosophy and government of ancient Greece, which created the foundation for all of the Western civilization From the Minotaur to Medusa to the Cyclops - fascinating creatures fueling mythological tales Stories about some of the most legendary figures in mythological history: Theseus and Perseus Contemporary visions of Greek characters and how they inform our Western institutions, our literary and artistic history, and our contemporary culture Greek mythology is diverse and fascinating, offering us an insight into how ancient people believed and lived, into what they valued and vilified, and into how they lived and thrived. Finally, if you have enjoyed these treasured tales of Greek mythology, don’t forget to explore the other fantastic realms of mythological magic in this series of books: Treasures of Egyptian Mythology Treasures of Celtic Mythology Treasures of Norse Mythology Treasures of Roman Mythology You will find yourself in awe of the sweeping scope of history and culture represented by these mythological traditions - as well as get a better understanding of how we continually make and re-make these myths for our own times. That’s the fabulous thing about myths: They never truly die.

©2019 Bluesource and Friends (P)2020 Bluesource and Friends

Narrator:
Author:
Length: 2 hrs and 38 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Fighting the Plague in Antiquity and the Middle Ages

Fighting the Plague in Antiquity and the Middle Ages

Summary

Plague and pestilence have both fascinated and terrified humanity from the very beginning. Societies and individuals have struggled to make sense of them, and more importantly they’ve often struggled to avoid them. Before the scientific age, people had no knowledge of the microbiological agents - unseen bacteria and viruses - which afflicted them, and thus the maladies were often ascribed to wrathful supernatural forces. Even when advances in knowledge posited natural causes for epidemics and pandemics, medicine struggled to deal with them, and for hundreds of years religion continued to work hand-in-hand with medicine. Inevitably, that meant physicians tried a variety of practices to cure the sick, and many of them seem quite odd by modern standards. By the time Rome was on the rise, physicians understood that contagions arose and spread, but according to Galen, Hippocrates, and other Greco-Roman authorities, pestilence was caused by miasma, foul air produced by the decomposition of organic matter. Though modern scientists have since been able to disprove this, on the face of it there was some logic to the idea. Physicians and philosophers (they were very often the same, Galen being an example) noticed that disease arose in areas of poor sanitation, where filth and rotting matter was prevalent and not disposed of, and the basic measures to prevent disease - waste removal, provision of clean food and water, and quarantining - would have been obvious to them. The scenting of miasmic air with incense and other unguents to expel the foulness would also have thus made sense, though people now know that can’t stop the spread of a disease. Ancient physicians at the time believed that miasma was not the direct cause of disease but rather a catalyst. Maladies were caused by an imbalance of what Galen called the four humors. According to him (and Hippocrates before him), the body contained four kinds of fluids: Black bile, yellow bile, blood, and phlegm. These corresponded to the four elements of which the entire universe was composed: Earth, fire, water, and air. Black bile was tied to earth, yellow bile to fire, blood to air, and phlegm to water. It was believed that the balance of the humors in the body not only determined an individual’s health, but their behavior and temperament as well. A melancholic (from melanos, the word for “black”) disposition was caused by an excess of black bile. Yellow bile made a person fiery or choleric (from khole, the word for bile), while a phlegmatic (from phlegma, body moisture) temperament denoted a surplus of phlegm. The most desirable temperament was the sanguine (sanguis, blood), which exhibited happiness, calm and enthusiasm. The ancient Romans thought miasma caused an imbalance in these fluids, and disease resulted. For the ancient physician, as indeed for all physicians for the next 1,500 years or so, illness was not the direct result of external agents. The High Middle Ages had seen a rise in Western Europe’s population in previous centuries, but these gains were almost entirely erased as the plague spread rapidly across all of Europe from 1346-1353. With a medieval understanding of medicine, diagnosis, and illness, nobody understood what caused Black Death or how to truly treat it. As a result, many religious people assumed it was divine retribution, while superstitious and suspicious citizens saw a nefarious human plot involved. Fighting the Plague in Antiquity and the Middle Ages: The History of Ancient and Medieval Efforts to Prevent the Spread of Diseases looks at the ways past societies have striven to cope with epidemics and the various remedies – some bizarre, some desperate, others logical but nonetheless misguided - they employed. The approaches include an eclectic mix of medicine, supernatural rituals, religion, and philosophy.

©2020 Charles River Editors (P)2020 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Daniel Houle
Length: 2 hrs and 6 mins
Available on Audible
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Roman History: 3 in 1

Summary

In this audiobook bundle, you get the best historical facts and knowledge you deserve. In the first audiobook, various aspects of the Roman Empire, its government, and its place in human history will be discussed. You'll learn more about leaders, habits, and practices. You'll find out how the empire died off and collapsed. In the second audiobook, a number of emperors come to light. Caligula, Nero, Marcus Aurelius, and Julius Caesar are only a few of the many emperors whose Roman lives are detailed in this comprehensive guide. In the third audiobook, Spartacus is covered in the first few sections. His rebellion against his slave owners typified several other rebellious acts, and is the key to what was common in those days to do with slaves, prostitutes, and how families were treated. The ins and outs of Roman society are shown in this elaborate audiobook. All in all, you get over plenty of explanations and clarifications of what the Romans and their empire looked about 2,000 years ago.

©2019 Summaries from History (P)2019 Summaries from History

Narrator: Miriam Webster
Author: Kelly Mass
Length: 11 hrs and 2 mins
Available on Audible
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Prehistoric Burial Rites

Summary

Burial rites underwent a massive change in prehistoric times - find out what happened!   Based on evidence from the archaeological record in the UK, Troy Newton takes an in-depth look at how burial rites changed between the second and third millennium BC.   You'll find out:   What happened to the long barrows   When and why grave goods were included   When the change occurred from excarnation to inhumation   When ancestor worship changed to a more individual focus   Page up and order.

©2018 Troy Newton (P)2018 Troy Newton

Author: Troy Newton
Length: 11 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Inscription of Tiglath-Pileser I, King of Assyria

Inscription of Tiglath-Pileser I, King of Assyria

1 rating

Summary

Tiglath-Pileser I was a king of Assyria during the Middle Assyrian period (1114-1076 BC). He expanded Assyrian rule into Anatolia and Syria, and to the shores of the Mediterranean. From this inscription, it is clear that cultivated a fear of himself in his subjects and in his enemies alike. Museum Audiobooks strives to present audiobook versions of authentic, unabridged historical texts from prior eras which contain a variety of points of view. The texts do not represent the views or opinions of Museum Audiobooks, and in certain cases may contain perspectives or language that is objectionable to the modern listener.

Public Domain (P)2019 Museum Audiobooks

Narrator: Teagan McKenzie
Author: A.H. Sayce
Length: 55 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for El Imperio Romano [The Roman Empire]

El Imperio Romano [The Roman Empire]

Summary

Explora la Fascinante Historia del Imperio Romano. El Imperio Romano fue una de las fuerzas más imponentes del mundo antiguo. Esta no es solo la historia de la conquista o su increíble organización, o de las instituciones que lo hicieron posible. El Imperio Romano no es otro aburrido cuento histórico. Por el contrario, despierta nuestra imaginación, nuestros miedos y hasta nos entretiene. Esta es la historia de los hombres y mujeres fascinantes - los emperadores, sus esposas, padres, hermanos, hermanas e hijos - que constituyen el atractivo de este imperio. Algunos de ellos, como Marco Aurelio y Antonino Pío, eran sabios y virtuosos: otros - como Calígula, Cómodo, y Caracalla - fueron verdaderos monstruos, cuya sed de sangre y apetito sexual no tenían límites. Esta es la historia de los eventos y personajes más relevantes ocurrida en un periodo entre dos acontecimientos importantes: el auge de Augusto en el primer siglo a.C. y el último saqueo de Roma a finales del siglo V d.C. Los temas a tratar incluyen: De la República al Imperio: El ascenso de Octavio La Era de Augusto La Dinastía Julio - Claudia después de Augusto: Desde Tiberio hasta Nerón La Guerra Civil y el Año de los Cuatro Emperadores (AD 68–69) Dinastía Flavia La Dinastía Antonina: Los Cinco Emperadores Buenos (y un par no tan buenos) Algunos Emperadores Nuevos Crisis, guerras Civiles y divisiones: El declive lento y doloroso Los dos imperios: Este y Oeste ¡Todo esto y mucho más que no puedes perderte! ¡Adquiere el libro ya y aprende más sobre el Imperio Romano! Please note: This audiobook is in Spanish.

©2018 Captivating History (P)2019 Captivating History

Length: 2 hrs and 8 mins
Available on Audible
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Science Education in the Early Roman Empire

2 ratings

Summary

Throughout the Roman Empire cities held public speeches and lectures, had libraries, and teachers and professors in the sciences and the humanities, some subsidized by the state. There even existed something equivalent to universities, and medical and engineering schools. What were they like? What did they teach? Who got to attend them? In the first treatment of this subject ever published, Dr. Richard Carrier answers all these questions and more, describing the entire education system of the early Roman Empire, with a unique emphasis on the quality and quantity of its science content. He also compares pagan attitudes toward the Roman system of education with the very different attitudes of ancient Jews and Christians, finding stark contrasts that would set the stage for the coming Dark Ages.

©2016 Richard Carrier (P)2016 Pitchstone Publishing

Narrator: Richard Carrier
Length: 4 hrs and 47 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Rome and the Mediterranean Vol. 2

Rome and the Mediterranean Vol. 2

2 ratings

Summary

After 18 years of desperate struggle, Rome has gradually turned the tide against Hannibal, and now the Carthaginian finds himself bottled up in the toe of Italy while Scipio ruthlessly tightens the noose around Carthage on the African mainland. Knowing that Hannibal must sooner or later abandon Italy and come to the aid of his countrymen, the brilliant Roman commander prepares for the inevitable test of strength. It is not long in coming. Volume 2 of Rome and the Mediterranean brings to an end the long and violent struggle between Scipio and Hannibal. The grand spectacle of naval and land battles, the political intrigue and tribal quarrels, and the interminable squabbles among the Greek city states...all comes to an end. Roman hegemony is now complete. If for no other reason, the pleasure of reading Polybius is his penetrating character analysis of the leading men of his day. There is something peculiarly modern about Polybius, though in his own day he was criticized for his lack of "style". In fact, by the time of the third century A.D., he had largely been forgotten in the West. He was resurrected in the Renaissance and found greater and greater support among republican thinkers, especially those of the Founding Fathers of the American Revolution. Until recently, Polybius was read only by those interested in Roman Republican and Greek Hellenistic history. However, his spectacular ability to draw the reader into the drama of the historical narrative has made him popular among modern readers, and all the more so as he is the primary source for those events in ancient history which are today considered not only of the utmost importance, but also of enduring interest. It is a great pity that his work did not survive intact, though we should consider ourselves fortunate to have what is left.

©2008 Public Domain (P)2008 Audio Connoisseur

Author: Polybius
Length: 11 hrs and 8 mins
Available on Audible
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Alexander the Great

Summary

In this succinct portrait of Alexander the Great, distinguished scholar and historian Norman Cantor draws on the major writings of Alexander's contemporaries, as well as the most recent psychological and cultural studies, to illuminate this most legendary of men - a great figure in the ancient world, whose puzzling personality greatly fueled his military accomplishments. Cantor describes Alexander's ambiguous relationship with his father, Philip II of Macedon; his oedipal involvement with his mother, the Albanian princess Olympias; and his bisexuality. He traces Alexander's attempts to bridge the East and West, using Achilles, hero of the Trojan War, as his model. Finally, Cantor explores Alexander's view of himself in relation to the pagan gods of Greece and Egypt. More than a biography, Cantor's Alexander the Great is a psychological rendering of a man of his time.

©2005 The Estate of Norman F. Cantor (P)2008 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

Narrator: Bronson Pinchot
Length: 4 hrs and 20 mins
Available on Audible
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The Neanderthals Rediscovered

7 ratings

Summary

In recent years, the common perception of the Neanderthals has been transformed, thanks to new discoveries and paradigm-shattering scientific innovations. It turns out that the Neanderthals' behavior was surprisingly modern: they buried the dead, cared for the sick, hunted large animals in their prime, harvested seafood, and communicated with spoken language. Meanwhile, advances in DNA technologies are compelling us to reassess the Neanderthals' place in our own past. For hundreds of thousands of years, Neanderthals evolved in Europe parallel to Homo sapiens evolving in Africa, and, when both species made their first forays into Asia, the Neanderthals may even have had the upper hand. In this important volume, Dimitra Papagianni and Michael A. Morse compile the first full chronological narrative of the Neanderthals' dramatic existence - from their evolution in Europe to their expansion to Siberia, their subsequent extinction, and ultimately their revival in popular novels, cartoons, cult movies, and television commercials.

©2015 Dimitra Papagianni and Michael A. Morse (P)2017 Tantor

Narrator: Nigel Patterson
Length: 5 hrs and 43 mins
Available on Audible
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Breve historia de los celtas

Summary

"Una obra que introduce en una larga y desconocida historia de siglos a través de personajes tan conocidos en el imaginario popular como Viriato, Vercingetórix o Boudicca y hechos que han provocado la admiración de la historia como la heroica resistencia de la ciudad de Numancia o el saqueo de Roma". Breve Historia de los Celtas, rubricado por Manuel Velasco es un trabajo que le ayudará a conocer la asombrosa variedad de una nación que se extendió por toda Europa, desde Grecia hasta España, e hizo del mestizaje su bandera.  Conocer a los celtas es conocer una parte de aquello que nos hace europeos. El libro nos introduce a la cultura, los héroes, los ritos, la mitología y la vida cotidiana, de un pueblo que se extendió por Austria, Suiza, Francia, Bélgica, España, Reino Unido y, por supuesto, Irlanda. Dividido en tres partes, Manuel Velasco nos narra en la primera la historia de su legendaria resistencia a la conquista romana, a través de tres figuras fundamentales: el hispano-luso Viriato, el galo Vercingetórix, y la británica Boudicca, reina guerrera que arrasó la ciudad de Londinum (Londres); completa este apartado una completa descripción de la vida cotidiana de los celtas en Irlanda. La segunda se ocupa de la religión y la mitología, el paso fundamental de una mitología arcana y politeísta, a un cristianismo impulsado por San Patricio. En la tercera se incluye una valiosísima información complementaria sobre el idioma y la escritura, los nombres celtas y los lugares emblemáticos de esta cultura (finisterres).  Fundamental para todos aquellos interesados en misterios como Stonehenge, Carnac o las tradiciones mágicas de los druidas, pero también para aquellos que quieran recrear la vida cotidiana y los ritos de un pueblo que está en la base de autores tan dispares y populares como Goscinny y Uderzo, y J.R.R. Tolkien.

©2009 Ediciones Nowtilus S.L. (P)2020 Audible Studios

Narrator: Lola Sans
Length: 5 hrs and 46 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for History of Rome

History of Rome

Summary

If you want to discover the captivating history of Rome, then pay attention.... Rome started as a kingdom, thrived as a republic, conquered vast territories when it was an empire, and became the Holy City during the Middle Ages. Even today, Rome continues to intrigue us with its rich history, architecture, art, literature, religion, laws, and language. The abundant archaeological findings of Rome and its surrounding are but a fragment of what the city once was. Nevertheless, it is enough to engage us, tickle our imagination, and satisfy our thirst for knowledge.  The importance of Rome cannot be argued. Its history is not the history of Italy or its people. Rome is a part of the foundation of Europe, just as Athens is. Without it, the world as we know it today wouldn’t exist. In History of Rome: A Captivating Guide to Roman History, Starting from the Legend of Romulus and Remus Through the Roman Republic, Byzantium, Medieval Period, and Renaissance to Modern History, you will discover topics such as: The founding of Rome: myth and reality The Kingdom of Rome The Roman Republic Social wars and the end of the Roman Republic Pax Romana The third and early fourth centuries The fall of the West; the East thrives Rome in the Middle Ages The Renaissance Modern history of Rome Much, much more

©2020 Captivating History (P)2020 Captivating History

Narrator: Jason Zenobia
Length: 6 hrs and 56 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for 24 Hours in Ancient Rome: A Day in the Life of the People Who Lived There

24 Hours in Ancient Rome: A Day in the Life of the People Who Lived There

Summary

Walk a day in a Roman's sandals. What was it like to live in one of the ancient world's most powerful and bustling cities - one that was eight times more densely populated than modern day New York? In this entertaining and enlightening guide, best-selling historian Philip Matyszak introduces us to the people who lived and worked there. In each hour of the day we meet a new character - from emperor to slave girl, gladiator to astrologer, medicine woman to water-clock maker - and discover the fascinating details of their daily lives.

©2017 Philip Matyszak (P)2020 Tantor

Narrator: Michael Page
Length: 6 hrs and 36 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Ancient Civilizations

Ancient Civilizations

Summary

Discover the history of ancient civilizations and how they lived! This bundle contains three books: Incas, Maya Civilization, and The Byzantine Empire.  Incas Have you always wanted to learn about the great Inca Empire, but your teachers refused to listen? Are you confused between Inca, Aztec, and Maya? Do you want to learn how the Inca people were unique from their Mesoamerican predecessors? Could you even draw the Inca Empire on a map? All this and more will be covered within this audiobook! Inside this book, you will find:   How an empire grew from such humble, and hostile, beginnings The geographic location of the empire An in-depth look at the Incan gods The terrible civil war The conquistadors And more Maya Civilization This book’s coverage begins with the development of the Maya through the ancient eras. Inside this book, you will find the following:  The history of the Maya people and where their civilization began and expanded from How the name “Maya” came to be used for these people Results of the Spanish conquest of Mesoamerica and what it meant for the Maya Why archaeologists believe the Maya empire fell And much more! The Byzantine Empire The history of the Byzantine Empire tells a tale of monumental victories and equally significant defeats - of a phoenix rising from the ashes over and over again, until it simply ran out of miracles. In this book, you will learn about: The division of east and west The Fall of Rome Justinian’s Golden Age Iconoclasm The Crusades The final fall And much more Don’t wait another moment to enjoy this information. Get your copy of Ancient Civilizations right away!

©2018 Eric Brown (P)2018 Eric Brown

Narrator: John B Leen
Author: Eric Brown
Length: 4 hrs and 59 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Ancient Greece: The Greatest Civilization

Ancient Greece: The Greatest Civilization

Summary

The very first democracy in the world found its origins in Ancient Greece. The most exquisite art and architecture of the world had its origins there. While education had its roots in many cultures after the Bronze Age, education found its flowering in the rise of some of greatest literature ever written. From the very small country of Greece came the development of the higher sciences. Even the most celebrated of sports events, the Olympics, started in a small city-state of Athens. In this audiobook you’ll listen about: Wars and Omens of More Early Classic Greece The Persians Greco-Roman and Byzantine Greece And much more! The Doric column was named after the Dorians, one of the root races indigenous to Ancient Greece. The Ionic column was named after their satellite colony, Iona in current-day Turkey. The Corinthian column is named after the ancient city of Corinth on the Southeastern coast of Greece. Live theater entertainment originated in the amphitheaters of Ancient Greece. Nowhere in the civilized world can anyone find no element from this civilization of explorers of the mind and the mysteries of myth. Greece has a history that lies within the experience of everyone. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.

©2018 Halcyon Time Ltd (P)2020 Halcyon Time Ltd

Narrator: Jason Zenobia
Length: 2 hrs and 1 min
Available on Audible
Cover art for Ancient Rome

Ancient Rome

Summary

Ancient Rome covers Roman civilization from the founding of the city of Rome to the collapse of the Western Roman Empire, encompassing the Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic, and Roman Empire, until the fall of the Western empire. Inside, you will learn about: A myth evolves into an empire The reign of terror Emperors, able or inept The Roman Empire is born The two faces of Caligula Division, decline, and death And much more! In its many centuries of existence, the Roman state evolved from a monarchy to the classical republic, and then to an increasingly autocratic empire. Rome professionalized and expanded its military and created a government system called res publica, the inspiration for modern republics. It achieved impressive technological and architectural feats, such as the construction of an extensive system of aqueducts and roads, as well as the construction of large monuments, palaces, and public facilities. Buy the audiobook and listen to this story right now! PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.

©2020 Halcyon Time Ltd (P)2020 Halcyon Time Ltd

Narrator: Jason Zenobia
Length: 1 hr and 35 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Soldier of Rome - The Sacrovir Revolt

Soldier of Rome - The Sacrovir Revolt

Summary

It has been three years since the wars against Arminius and the Cherusci. Gaius Silius, legate of the 20th Legion, is concerned that the barbarians - though shattered by the war - may be stirring once again. He also seeks to confirm the rumors regarding Arminius' death. What Silius does not realize is that there is a new threat to the empire, but it does not come from beyond the frontier; it is coming from within, where a disenchanted nobleman looks to sow the seeds of rebellion in Gaul. Legionary Artorius has greatly matured during his five years in the legions. He has become stronger in mind, his body growing even more powerful. Like the rest of the legion, he is unaware of the shadow growing well within the empire's borders, where a disaffected nobleman seeks to betray Emperor Tiberius. A shadow looms, one that looks to envelope the province of Gaul as well as the Rhine legions. The year is AD 20.

©2008, 2012 James Mace (P)2016 James Mace

Narrator: Nigel Patterson
Author: James Mace
Length: 10 hrs and 16 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Ancient Greek Technology

Ancient Greek Technology

Summary

"What I would prefer is that you should fix your eyes every day on the greatness of Athens as she really is, and should fall in love with her. When you realize her greatness, then reflect that what made her great was men with a spirit of adventure, men who knew their duty, men who were ashamed to fall below a certain standard. If they ever failed in an enterprise, they made up their minds that at any rate the city should not find their courage lacking to her, and they gave to her the best contribution that they could." ("The Funeral Oration of Pericles", quoted by Thucydides)  In virtually all fields of human endeavor, ancient Athens was so much at the forefront of dynamism and innovation that the products of its most brilliant minds remain not only influential but entirely relevant to this day. In the field of medicine, the great physician Hippocrates not only advanced the practical knowledge of human anatomy and care-giving but changed the entire face of the medical profession. The great philosophers of Athens, men like Aristotle, Socrates, and Plato, interrogated themselves with startling complexity about the nature of good and evil, questioned the existence of divinity, advocated intelligent design, and went so far as to argue that all life was composed of infinitesimal particles.  The flowering of Greek civilization was further made possible by an increase of trade between the cities and with other civilizations. Trade became a major occupation on account of the scarcity of agricultural land in the largely mountainous regions of the Balkan peninsula. The polis of Athens, in particular, assumed economic dominance in the Aegean from the sixth-century BC. The consequent increase in wealth, resources and population made a cultural renaissance possible. Commerce, in turn, led to the rise of an affluent aristocratic class which had the leisure to devote itself to learning, philosophy, and art. It also led to an industrial class of freemen who were artists and craftsmen.  Religion also played a role in the development of Greek culture and technology. The ancient Greeks worshiped a multiplicity of gods, the chief of which dwelt on Mount Olympus in the first mountainous region of central Greece. The city-states would regularly send athletes to compete in the Olympic Games in their honor. Thales of Miletus (c. 524 - 546 BC), named by the classicist John Burnet "the first scientist", observed the natural world and sought rational explanations for it. From him a tradition emerged which explored the world and the actions of humans through natural science, reason, mathematics, metaphysics, and ontology. After Thales a stream of philosophers, mathematicians, and engineers emerged, including names that are well known today, including Plato, Aristotle, Socrates, Pythagoras, Archimedes, Heraclitus, Epicurus, Diogenes, and Plutarch.

©2019 Charles River Editors (P)2019 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Dan Gallagher
Length: 2 hrs and 30 mins
Available on Audible
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Ancient Rome: A History from Beginning to End

Summary

Rome is a city of myth and legend. The Eternal City, the city of the seven hills, the sacred city, the caput mundi, the center of the world, Roma, Rome, by any of her many names is a city built of history and blood, marble and water, war and conquest. Inside you will hear about.... Legendary Beginnings The Senate and the People Ave Caesar Empire Rulers of the World The Fall Legacy From legendary beginnings, a city rose from the swamp surrounded by the seven hills and split by the Tiber River. Built and rebuilt, a sacred republic and a divine empire, blessed by a thousand gods and by One, the story of her rise and fall has been told and retold for a thousand years and is still relevant in today's world, as echoes of her ancient glory have shaped our culture, laws, lifestyle, and beliefs in subtle and pervasive ways.

©2016 Hourly History (P)2017 Hourly History

Length: 1 hr
Available on Audible
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The Siege of Masada

Summary

Many westerners have never even heard of the Siege of Masada, and those who have may simply know it as an obscure reference to a minor battle fought in a remote location of the Roman world. By contrast, virtually all Israeli school children know the story of Masada as a premier example of nationalistic pride. The heroic story of a small band of fighters facing incalculable odds has many elements that are reminiscent of both the Battle of Thermopylae and the Battle of the Alamo. The refrain "Masada shall not fall again", coined in a poem on the subject by Yitzak Lamdan, became a cry of resolve in battle for Israeli soldiers in the 20th century, just as the cry of "Remember the Alamo" had galvanized Americans. For decades the Israelite military used the site of Masada as the location for swearing in their new recruits; the choice of the site was designed to evoke within the new soldiers a deep sense of connection with their national history. The Siege of Masada was the final battle in a long series of fights that constituted the First Jewish-Roman War. The Roman Empire had established control over the region in the first century BCE, when the Roman proconsul Pompey the Great took control of Jerusalem and ceremonially defiled their temple by entering it. This mix of political control and religious desecration was a contentious issue for the Judeans throughout the Roman period, and militant activists opposed to Roman rule, often espousing strongly held religious beliefs, frequently developed large followings to challenge the Roman authorities. This led to multiple violent clashes between the Judeans and the Romans, and the First Jewish-Roman War (66-73 CE) was one such clash (albeit on a larger scale than most). The Roman troops marched through and made their military might felt, first in the northern region of Galilee, then down the coast where they finally laid siege to the capital city of Jerusalem. This left three Roman fortress outposts, including Masada, that had been built by Herod the Great but had been taken over by various Judean factions. Masada was the last of these fortresses that the Romans attacked and proved the most difficult for them to seize, but seize it they did. However, what made this battle qualitatively different from most was not just the difficulty Rome had in retaking control of it with incredibly disproportional military equipment and numbers, but also the actions of the Judean defenders. In the final hours of the battle, just as the Romans were about to breach the walls of the city, the defenders gathered together and committed mass suicide, rather than being killed or taken captive by the Romans. Josephus, a contemporary historian of the era, vividly described the mass suicide.

©2016 Charles River Editors (P)2017 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Colin Fluxman
Length: 1 hr and 49 mins
Available on Audible
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Esparta [Sparta]

Summary

4 manuscritos completos en 1 audiolibro   Espartanos: Una Fascinante Guía Acerca de los Temibles Guerreros de la Antigua Grecia, Que Incluye Tácticas Militares Espartanas, la Batalla de las Termópilas, Cómo Gobernó Esparta y Más Las Guerras Médicas: Una Guía Fascinante de los Conflictos Entre el Imperio Aqueménide y las Ciudades-Estado Griegas, Incluida la Batalla De Maratón, Termópilas, Salamis, Platea y Más La Batalla de las Termópilas: Una Guía Fascinante Sobre Una de las Batallas más Grandes de la Historia Antigua Entre los Espartanos y los persas La Guerra del Peloponeso: Una Guía Fascinante Sobre la Antigua Guerra Griega Entre las Dos Principales Ciudades-Estado de la Antigua Grecia: Atenas y Esparta La primera parte de este audiolibro incluye: Quiénes Fueron los Espartanos La Hegemonía Espartana, la Guerra de Corinto, y el Declive de Esparta Gobierno Espartano, Militar, y Sociedad ¡Y mucho, mucho más! Al leer la segunda parte de este audiolibro: En la víspera de la guerra La revuelta jónica La invasión de Jerjes Parte 1: Las batallas de las Termópilas y el Artemisio La invasión de Jerjes Parte 2: Las batallas de Salamina y Platea La guerra de la Liga de Delos Las secuelas de la guerra El ejército griego El ejército persa ¡Y mucho, mucho más! Tercera parte de este audiolibro: Antes de la batalla de las Termópilas Los personajes principales de la batalla de las Termópilas Mientras tanto, en Artemisio ¡Y mucho, mucho más! Cuatro parte de este audiolibro: Entendiendo el Peloponeso El impacto de la guerra en la cultura griega ¡Y mucho, mucho más! ¡Obtenga ahora este audiolibro para aprender más sobre los espartanos! Please note: This audiobook is in Spanish.

©2020 Captivating History (P)2020 Captivating History

Length: 10 hrs and 43 mins
Available on Audible
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Breve historia de Babilonia [Brief History of Babylon]

Summary

"Pienso que esta breve historia de Babilonia merece la pena leerse porque nos ofrece las claves históricas fundamentales que un lector culto de hoy debe tener como base para sustentar las ideas sobre el Antiguo Testamento y también sobre el Nuevo.” (Blogs Periodista Digital) “Montero Fenollós sabe darle un toque ágil a su trabajo, haciendo que sea más amena al compartir con nosotros su amor por esta cultura. Dicho aspecto se contagia al lector, que abre sus ansias de conocimiento para recibir una interesantísima cantidad de datos históricos.” (Web Anika entre libros) Una ciudad tan majestuosa como Atenas o Roma pero absolutamente desconocida. Es poco lo que se sabe de Babilonia a parte de unas cuantas anécdotas, este libro es fundamental para comprender poemas épicos como Gilgamesh, figuras bíblicas y de la música clásica como Nabucodonosor o auténticos enigmas arquitectónicos como la Torre de Babel sobre la que se conocen no pocas leyendas. Montero Fenollós nos intentará desvelar estos y otros misterios de la historia en un libro que supone el primer ensayo en castellano sobre la capital de Mesopotamia. El libro nos presenta la historia de esta ciudad, cosmopolita y majestuosa, de un modo asequible pero sin dejar de tocar todos los puntos fundamentales de la vida de esta urbe desconocida. Parte de la excavaciones de franceses e ingleses para situarnos en el mapa y señalar los lugares más importantes de la ciudad y, desde allí, recorre todos los acontecimientos más importantes desde el reinado de Hammurabi hasta el fin de la ciudad con la invasión de Ciro el persa y de Alejandro Magno dos siglos después, sin dejar de estudiar el reinado de Nabucodonosor II que llevó a la ciudad a su máximo esplendor. Pero además, incluye unos capítulos en los que el autor se mete de lleno en la topografía de la ciudad y las costumbres de sus habitantes, intenta separar el mito de la realidad en torno a la construcción de la Torre de Babel y, por último, nos descubre su religión de la que los judíos tomaron ideas acerca de los ángeles o los demonios. Razones para comprar la obra: Supone el primer ensayo en castellano sobre Babilonia. Presenta una hipótesis novedosa sobre la Torre de Babel. Profundiza en figuras relevantes pero desconocidas como Hammurabi o Nabucodonosor II. Explica la religión mesopotámica que influye al judaísmo y, con él, al cristianismo y al islam. El libro es, en resumen, fundamental para entender la historia de esta ciudad, tan influyente como Atenas y Roma, pero absolutamente desconocida. Devastada por las invasiones persas y macedonias, pervertida en un intento de reconstrucción por Sadam Hussein, Babilonia toma cuerpo en este libro con el brillo de sus años de esplendor. Please note: This audiobook is in Spanish.

©2012 Ediciones Nowtilus S.L. (P)2020 Audible, Inc.

Narrator: Jorge Rugerio
Length: 5 hrs and 46 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for El infinito en un junco [Infinity in a Reed]

El infinito en un junco [Infinity in a Reed]

Summary

EL ENSAYO REVELACIÓN DE LA TEMPORADAPREMIO NACIONAL DE ENSAYO 2020  De humo, de piedra, de arcilla, de seda, de piel, de árboles, de plástico y de luz... Un recorrido por la vida del libro y de quienes lo han salvaguardado durante casi treinta siglos. Premio el Ojo Crítico de Narrativa 2019 Prólogo narrado por la autora Este es un libro sobre la historia de los libros. Un recorrido por la vida de ese fascinante artefacto que inventamos para que las palabras pudieran viajar en el espacio y en el tiempo.  La historia de su fabricación, de todos los tipos que hemos ensayado a lo largo de casi treinta siglos: libros de humo, de piedra, de arcilla, de juncos, de seda, de piel, de árboles y, los últimos llegados, de plástico y luz. Es, además, un libro de viajes.Una ruta con escalas en los campos de batalla de Alejandro y en la Villa de los Papiros bajo la erupción del Vesubio, en los palacios de Cleopatra y en el escenario del crimen de Hipatia, en las primeras librerías conocidas y en los talleres de copia manuscrita, en las hogueras donde ardieron códices prohibidos, en el gulag, en la biblioteca de Sarajevo y en el laberinto subterráneo de Oxford en el año 2000.  Un hilo que une a los clásicos con el vertiginoso mundo contemporáneo, conectándolos con debates actuales: Aristófanes y los procesos judiciales contra humoristas, Safo y la voz literaria de las mujeres, Tito Livio y el fenómeno fan, Séneca y la posverdad... Pero, sobre todo, esta es una fabulosa aventura colectiva protagonizada por miles de personas que, a lo largo del tiempo, han hecho posibles y han protegido los libros: narradoras orales, escribas, iluminadores, traductores, vendedores ambulantes, maestras, sabios, espías, rebeldes, monjas, esclavos, aventureras; Lectores en paisajes de montaña y junto al mar que ruge, en las capitales donde la energía se concentra y en los enclaves más apartados donde el saber se refugia en tiempos de caos. Gente común cuyos nombres en muchos casos no registra la historia, esos salvadores de libros que son los auténticos protagonistas de este ensayo. 

©2019 Irene Vallejo Moreu (P)2020 Penguin Random House Grupo Editorial, S.A.U.

Narrator: Elena Silva
Length: 17 hrs and 59 mins
Available on Audible
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The Roman Empire

1 rating

Summary

Discover the story of the greatest empire in history. Peter Wings travels back into the age of Caesar. Stories of war and power that changed forever the future of years to come. From the conquest of the Mediterranean to the destruction of the Roman Empire by barbarian invaders, we will cover every single aspect in the Roman history. Prepare for a time travel. Prepare to meet Pompey, Julius Caesar, Augustus, Nero, Constantine, and many personalities who changed the way we live.

©2019 Peter Wings (P)2020 Peter Wings

Narrator: Peter Prova
Author: Peter Wings
Length: 5 hrs and 46 mins
Available on Audible
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Emperors of Rome

12 ratings

Summary

What sort of men were the Roman emperors (and were they all men)? What background and training, if any, prepared them for their awesome responsibilities? What depravities did they display? And what achievements can they claim: laws passed, monuments built, lands and peoples conquered? Dive into these questions and more with this introduction to the complex personalities of emperors such as Augustus, Caligula, Claudius, and Nero. These thirty-six gripping lectures bring to life the many emperors of Rome from the turn of the 1st century to the transition to the Middle Ages. For more than five centuries, these emperors-a checkered mix of the wise, the brutal, and the unhinged-presided over a multi-ethnic empire that was nearly always at war. Professor Fagan takes you deep into ancient Rome, asking: How did this system of rule come about? What did it replace? And who were the colorful, cruel, and crafty men who filled the almost omnipotent post of emperor? One of the most intriguing questions about the emperorship is why it endured for so long. As you witness the reigns of the successive rulers unfold, you will see how the office evolved with the political forces that sustained it, becoming more and more tightly bound to the military. Each step toward despotism was taken with a view toward expedience. But when that step became the new normal, it paved the way for the next step, and so on. As you explore these questions, you'll also study the amalgam of eyewitness reports, later compilations, archaeological remains, and inscriptions on monuments and coins. Contemporary accounts, when available, are not necessarily to be trusted, which means you play the role of detective, sifting for the truth of this spellbinding era. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2007 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2007 The Great Courses

Length: 17 hrs and 38 mins
Available on Audible
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The Battle of Thermopylae

Summary

If you want to discover the captivating history of the Battle of Thermopylae, then pay attention....   The Battle of Thermopylae is one of the most famous battles in human history. It featured two of the ancient world’s most prominent cultures, the Achaemenid-led Persian Empire and the fragmented yet culturally advanced Greeks. It also included some of history’s most famous leaders, such as the Persian king Xerxes and the Spartan king and military general Leonidas.   This glorification is apt only because the battle was indeed an important moment in the much larger conflict known as the Greco-Persian Wars. However, the Greeks lost this battle. In fact, it was a slaughter. Had it not been for some good fortune as well as an advantage in terms of equipment and fighting techniques, the Battle of Thermopylae could have gone down in history as the beginning of the end for one of the world’s great civilizations.   That these soldiers were more willing to die than to surrender to the evil Persians is part of the reason why this battle has become so famous. It serves as a symbol of what people will do to protect their freedom and their homeland. Sure, much of our memory of the Battle of Thermopylae is glorified untruth, but no one can deny that the Greeks and the Persians, in late August or early September of 480 BCE, fought one of the most important battles in one of the most important wars of the ancient era.   In this audiobook, you will discover topics such as Leading up to the Battle of Thermopylae The main characters of the Battle of Thermopylae Greece and Persia prepare for battle The Battle of Thermopylae: Seven days to last the test of time After the Battle of Thermopylae The Greek and Persian armies And much, much more! So if you want to learn more about the Battle of Thermopylae, buy this book now!

©2019 Captivating History (P)2019 Captivating History

Narrator: Colin Fluxman
Length: 1 hr and 18 mins
Available on Audible
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The Scientist in the Early Roman Empire

1 rating

Summary

In this extensive sequel to Science Education in the Early Roman Empire, Dr. Richard Carrier explores the social history of scientists in the Roman era. Was science in decline or experiencing a revival under the Romans? What was an ancient scientist thought to be and do? Who were they, and who funded their research? And how did pagans differ from their Christian peers in their views toward science and scientists? Some have claimed Christianity valued them more than their pagan forebears. In fact the reverse is the case. And this difference in values had a catastrophic effect on the future of humanity. The Romans may have been just a century or two away from experiencing a scientific revolution. But once in power, Christianity kept that progress on hold for a thousand years - while forgetting most of what the pagans had achieved and discovered, from an empirical anatomy, physiology, and brain science to an experimental physics of water, gravity, and air. Thoroughly referenced and painstakingly researched, this volume is a must for anyone who wants to learn how far we once got, and why we took so long to get to where we are today.

©2017 Richard Carrier (P)2018 Pitchstone Publishing

Narrator: Richard Carrier
Length: 18 hrs and 29 mins
Available on Audible
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Historical Sketches of the Ancient Negro

Summary

Historical Sketches of the Ancient Negro (1920) by Edward and Josephine sought to correct the image of their African ancestors in the perception of Afro-Americans. The authors explore the ancient history of Kush, Ethiopia, Nubia and other African kingdoms, relying on Biblical text and other primary sources to retell the story of black Africans from an Afrocentric point of view, and providing an important early contribution to Ancient African history.  In describing the Ethiopians of the Kingdom of Kush, the authors point to Zipporah and Tharbis, the wives of Moses. Queen Candace, whose eunuch was baptized by Phillip, was an Ethiopian and one of a long line of Candaces (queens) of Kush. Ebed-Melech, the man who rescued the prophet Jeremiah from the pit prison was an Ethiopian. Solomon's renowned visitor, Makeda, queen of Sheba, was another Ethiopian sovereign.  This work is a valuable resource for those interested in Ancient Africa’s contributions to civilization.

Public Domain (P)2020 Museum Audiobooks

Length: 3 hrs and 2 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Horrible Histories: Groovy Greeks

Horrible Histories: Groovy Greeks

2 ratings

Summary

Listeners can discover all the foul facts about the Groovy Greeks, including why girls ran about naked pretending to be bears, who had the world's first flushing toilet and why dedicated doctors tasted their patients' ear wax!

©1995 Terry Deary & Martin Brown (P)2013 Scholastic UK

Narrator: Terry Deary
Length: 56 mins
Available on Audible
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Mysterious Polynesia: The Myths, Legends, and Mysteries of the Polynesians

Summary

Taking into account similarities of appearance, customs and languages spread across a vast region of scattered islands, it was obvious that the Polynesian race emerged from a single origin, and that origin Cook speculated was somewhere in the Malay Peninsula or the “East Indies.” In this regard, he was not too far from the truth. The origins of the Polynesian race have been fiercely debated since then, and it was only relatively recently, through genetic and linguistic research, that it can now be stated with certainty that the Polynesian race originated on the Chinese mainland and the islands of Taiwan, the Philippines, Malaysia and Indonesia. Oceania was, indeed, the last major region of the Earth to be penetrated and settled by people, and Polynesia was the last region of Oceania to be inhabited. The vehicle of this expansion was the outrigger canoe, and aided by tides and wind patterns, a migration along the Malay Archipelago, and across the wide expanses of the South Pacific, began sometime between 3000 and 1000 BCE, reaching the western Polynesian Islands in about 900 BCE.  The name Polynesia derives from the ancient Greek meaning “many islands.” The word was first used to describe the entirety of the South Sea Islands by the 18th century French writer and traveler Charles de Brosses, but technically, Polynesia refers specifically to an area described by a vast triangle that stretches across the southern Pacific, with Hawaii, Easter Island and New Zealand serving as the points. Close to the center of this triangle lies Tahiti, with the west limit defined by Samoa and Tonga, with a slight irregularity in the western edge of the triangle that serves to exclude Fiji, the Solomon Islands, the New Hebrides, and a handful of Melanesian and Micronesian islands. The Melanesian demographic tends to differ quite dramatically from the Polynesian in both appearance and culture, the former tending to be of darker complexion, while the latter is more characteristic of the South Seas islanders of popular mythology.  Furthermore, not all of the islands included in the broad delineation of Polynesia are the tiny islets and atolls of popular imagination, resplendent with blue lagoons, white sand beaches and pristine coral reefs. Most are located within the tropics and have all the characteristics of an island paradise, but many others, such as Easter Island, the Chatham Islands, and New Zealand, lie well to the south and are, as a consequence, temperate in climate and biology.  While the timing of the populations’ movements can be accurately plotted, the motivations and methodology have tended to come to light only through the study of the oral tradition and the folklore associated with many dispersed, but culturally associated peoples. Indeed, when scholars go through the traditions and mythology passed down by people who are dispersed across thousands of miles of water and islands, they are amazed at the striking similarities. Typically, the cultural memories related to these waves of migration speak of warfare and internecine quarrels, often with the defeated chief or king leading an expedition away and thereafter assuming the role of the “first man” in the creation of a new society and political structure.  Mysterious Polynesia: The Myths, Legends, and Mysteries of the Polynesians chronicles some of these remarkable stories, as well as lingering mysteries across the region. You will learn about Polynesia like never before.

©2019 Charles River Editors (P)2019 Charles River Editors

Length: 2 hrs and 24 mins
Available on Audible
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The Mysterious Etruscans

6 ratings

Summary

How much do you know about the Etruscans? Many people, even those who are fascinated by ancient history, are less familiar with this intriguing culture than with the history of Greece and Rome - but the story of the Etruscans is equally captivating and far more important than you may have known. This ancient civilization prospered in the region of modern-day Tuscany, maintaining extensive trade networks, building impressive fortified cities, making exquisite art, and creating a culture that, while deeply connected to the Greeks and Romans, had striking contrasts. The Etruscans were the original inhabitants of central Italy. Centuries before Rome's rise, they built cities such as Pompeii, Capua, and Orvieto along fortified hilltops. They developed a system of roads and invented what we call the Roman arch. While they had their own system of government, their own myths and legends, and their own cultural attributes, the Etruscans imported and repurposed much from the Greeks - and, in turn, gave much to the Romans. You might be surprised to find out how much of Roman civilization - from togas to bronze military armor to Rome itself - actually has Etruscan origins. The Etruscans are largely responsible for: transmitting the alphabet to the Romans and other ancient societies as far away as the Nordic regions granting Rome much of its celebrated architecture and infrastructure, from the Cloaca Maxima water-control system to the storied arch developing exquisite works of bronze and terra-cotta, as well as mesmerizing tomb paintings creating well-known symbols of republican government, imagery that still lives on in US government buildings like the Lincoln Memorial Without the Etruscans, much of what we associate with the Roman world, and thus the foundations of Western civilization, would largely disappear. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2016 The Great Courses (P)2016 The Teaching Company, LLC

Narrator: Steven L. Tuck
Length: 12 hrs and 42 mins
Available on Audible
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The Roots of Western Civilization

1 rating

Summary

In this course, Prof. Anthony Esolen will examine ancient Mesopotamia, Greece, Rome and Israel, seeing the disappointment and Messianic longing in the pagan Roman poet Virgil, and the fulfilled Messianic longing among the prophets and the inspired authors of the Old Testament. You will discover the ways in which the fulfillment of the person of Jesus Christ never ceases to surprise mankind, because it never ceases to contradict what fallen man accepts as great. As Esolen unfolds: Fallen man worships power, and Jesus enters Jerusalem on the foal of a donkey. Fallen man listens to sophisticated and sly rhetoric, but Jesus praises God for revealing mysteries to fools and children, and concealing them from those who are wise in the world’s ways. Fallen man clings to his creature comforts, but Jesus gives his life away. And at that, he gives it away to his enemies - namely to us. Fallen man wants to rule, but Jesus emptied himself, becoming obedient until death, even death upon a cross. Now, this changes the world entirely. We could fill a library with books on this change and still not plunged its depths. In this course, we will examine the ways in which even a pagan world anticipates this change, and we will end by considering the life of one man who discovered the radicality of this change upon the movements of his heart.   In what way does the pagan world cry out for a savior? How do the confessions of one man speak to the universal within all of mankind? To examine the roots of a Civilization is to return to its life-source - its philosophies, myths, laws, and religions, in short its culture. Join Prof. Anthony Esolen as he journeys through the great literature of the ancient world discovering not only the timeless wisdom of such texts as the Theogony, the Aeneid, and the Confessions, but also their rich and broad impact on Western Civilization.

©2019 Saint Benedict Press (P)2019 Saint Benedict Press

Narrator:
Author:
Length: 4 hrs and 16 mins
Available on Audible
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Cities of the Ancient World

4 ratings

Summary

We live in a world of cities - for the first time ever, the majority of the population lives in an urban environment - and reflecting on ancient models of the "city" as a human phenomenon offers important lessons for our culture today. Cities of the Ancient World is your opportunity to survey the breadth of the ancient world through the context of its urban development. Taught by esteemed Professor Steven L. Tuck, of Miami University, these 24 eye-opening lectures not only provide an invaluable look at the design and architecture of ancient cities, they also offer a flesh-and-blood glimpse into the daily lives of ordinary people and the worlds they created. Cities of the Ancient World gives you insight into cities large and small, famous and obscure. Ultimately, however, this is a course about people, not just buildings. Studying these cities will give you a new appreciation for the remarkable cultures of the ancient world, from the ruins of Uruk to the Golden Age of Athens, and spur you to reflect on what makes a city survive. More than anything else, Cities of the Ancient World is a course about human beings - what life was like in these cities and how people lived.

©2014 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2014 The Great Courses

Narrator: Steven L. Tuck
Length: 11 hrs and 48 mins
Available on Audible
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The Bronze Age in Europe

Summary

While the Bronze Age is recognized as one of history’s most important phases, it’s been hard for historians to precisely date. The idea of the Bronze Age comes from a three-age system developed in the 19th century through which archaeologists and historians believe cultures evolved. These three ages are the Stone Age, the Bronze Age, and the Iron Age, and the concept of the system stems from the simultaneous development of museums in Europe during that time. In the Royal Museum of Nordic Antiquities in Denmark, Christian Jürgensen Thomsen, the director of the museum, began classifying objects of stone, bronze, or iron to better categorize and exhibit them.  Each archaeological artifact was thus sorted according to their materials and further organized by shape and style. Through such methodology, working alongside archaeological reports, he was able to show how certain objects changed over time (Fagan 1996, 712).  Such a typology, combined with stratigraphy noted in archaeological reports, was useful to early archaeologists with no reliable method for dating artifacts. By understanding which object came before or after, early archaeologists had a relative dating system with which to assess the age of an object or culture. This kind of system was useful to the archaeologists who often encountered objects from above-ground burials that lacked stratigraphy.  When this three-age system reached England, John Lubbock expanded on it by applying cultural anthropology to the ages. Over time, other researchers would gradually add their interpretations to the system, with many arguing for sub-divisions of the Stone Age or the introduction of a Copper Age between the Neolithic and the Bronze Ages (Rowley-Conwy 2007, 243).  The Bronze Age in Europe: The History and Legacy of Civilizations Across Europe from 3200-600 BCE looks at the different cultures that emerged over those crucial years. You will learn about the Bronze Age in Europe like never before.

©2019 Charles River Editors (P)2019 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Dan Gallagher
Length: 1 hr and 39 mins
Available on Audible
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The Punic Wars

1 rating

Summary

If you want to discover the captivating history of the Punic Wars, then pay attention.... The Punic Wars between 264 BCE and 146 BCE were a series of wars fought between the armies of ancient Carthage and Rome. In the years before the battles broke out, Carthage had risen from a small port community to the Mediterranean region's richest and most powerful city. Carthage had a powerful navy, a mercenary army, and ample resources to act as an authority in trade and politics. As such, Carthage prohibited Roman trade in the Western Mediterranean through an agreement with what was then just a small city called Rome. Without an organized military, Rome had little choice but to abide by the treaty. As history shows, however, Rome didn’t stay small and insignificant for long. As its size and power grew, so, too, did Rome’s desire to fight back against its Carthaginian oppressors: so followed the three Punic Wars. At the start of the conflict, Carthage dominated the Mediterranean. By the end of the wars, Rome had not only conquered Carthage, but had become the strongest society in the Western Mediterranean. It was a formative period for the Roman Republic and one that would eventually lead Rome to form its own empire. In The Punic Wars: A Captivating Guide to the First, Second, and Third Punic Wars Between Rome and Carthage, Including the Rise and Fall of Hannibal Barca, you will discover topics such as: A never-before-told story of what the Punic Wars were all about, where it was fought, and the major events surrounding the historical war A full account of the epic battles fought during the three wars that spanned over 118 years The outcome of the many years of warfare between the two major powers, Carthage and Rome And much, much more! So if you want to learn more about the Punic Wars, scroll up and click the "Buy Now" button!

©2020 Captivating History (P)2020 Captivating History

Narrator: Jason Zenobia
Length: 3 hrs and 13 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Life of Publicola

The Life of Publicola

Summary

Publius Valerius Publicola, the subject of Plutarch’s The Life of Publicola, is one of the most influential Roman figures to be written about in the author’s Parallel Lives series. Originally from Sabine, Publicola made his life in Rome with the intent to support the unification of Rome’s people. However, when the revolution happened, he and four others drove out Lucius Tarquinius Superbus and reformed the state. His political presence only grew, and by the time of his death, he was one of the most beloved Roman politicians in the land.  

Public Domain (P)2018 Audio Sommelier

Narrator: Andrea Giordani
Length: 54 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Celtic Mythology

Celtic Mythology

Summary

Celtic Mythology Are you interested in ancient cultures, meaningful tales, and entrancing folklore?  Because if you are, this audiobook has much in store for you.  Do you know that the Celtic culture and folklore, though with a primarily Irish origin, has widespread branches across the globe - as far as the British, Scottish, and Welsh cultures of Europe, and right into the Euro-Asian territory of Turkey? It is a culture that was as interesting as it was mysterious and has passed its knowledge of mythological creatures and deities from generation to generation, developing a holistic view of the universe. This audiobook can provide you with a combination of all the aspects of Celtic mythology - from its Irish and Welsh origins to its Scottish and Brittany sides - allowing you to have a complete 360-degree view of the world with a perspective that is much more interesting and spiritually accurate than the contemporary ones. In this audiobook, you will be discovering a completely different side of the universe and looking at deities that seem to have much in common with the Greek Gods but are believed to be different. It accounts for all the tales, gods, legendary creatures and beliefs that have dominated the Celtic folklore and been conveyed by it - being handed down generation to generation for centuries. The audiobook conveys: Who the Celts were and what beliefs they shared? Why and how their tales were passed down from generation to generation Tens of the interesting myths and tales that the Celtic people shared Comprehensive insights into their culture and how far and wide their branches spread Details of their Gods and other religious concepts

©2020 Josh Drake (P)2020 Josh Drake

Narrator: Kevin Ford MVO
Author: Josh Drake
Length: 3 hrs and 19 mins
Available on Audible
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The Mongol Conquests

2 ratings

Summary

If you want to discover the captivating history of the Mongol Conquests, then pay attention.... The Mongols were also known to be both merciful as well as tolerant. Moreover, their conquests weren’t aimed against civilized life; in fact, they helped connect numerous cultures and facilitated the spread of ideas and knowledge across the continent. Of course, the Mongols themselves were not uncultured brutes, as they had their own civilization, society, and traditions. With all that being said, this does not mean they were innocent for all the destruction they caused. Instead, it is implied that the Mongols weren’t like fire, causing annihilation wherever they passed. They were more like water, capable of causing floods and carving mountains while at the same time creating fertile soil and giving life. Like many other topics in history, the Mongol story has more than one side, and this book will try to present as many as possible. It will explore both the bloody history of Genghis Khan and his conquests while showing that he and his fellow Mongols were capable of much more than that. Diving deep inside their culture and society, we’ll cast off their barbaric image.  In The Mongol Conquests: A Captivating Guide to the Invasions and Conquests Initiated by Genghis Khan That Created the Vast Mongol Empire, you will discover topics such as: Origin of the Mongols Rise of Genghis Khan and the unification of the Steppes The Mongol Conquest of the East Genghis Khan’s revenge Death and succession of the Great Khan From unity to division - Genghis’ Heirs The last of the Great Khans The Mongol war machine Mongol state, society, and culture And much, much more! So if you want to learn more about the Mongol Conquests, buy this book now!

©2019 Captivating History (P)2019 Captivating History

Narrator: Jason Zenobia
Length: 4 hrs and 2 mins
Available on Audible
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The Ides

Summary

The assassination of Julius Caesar is one of the most notorious murders in history. Even now, many questions remain about his death: Was Brutus the hero and Caesar the villain? Was Mark Antony aware of the plot? Using historical evidence to sort out these and other puzzling issues, historian and award-winning author Stephen Dando-Collins recaptures the drama of Caesar's demise and the chaotic aftermath as the vicious struggle unfolded for power between Antony and Octavian. For the first time, he shows how the religious festivals and customs of the day impacted how the assassination plot unfolded and how the murder was almost avoided at the last moment. A compelling history packed with intrigue and written with the pacing of a first-rate mystery, The Ides will challenge what we think we know about Julius Caesar and the Roman Empire.

©2010 Stephen Dando-Collins (P)2010 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

Narrator: Bronson Pinchot
Length: 8 hrs and 11 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for A Brief History of Roman Britain

A Brief History of Roman Britain

1 rating

Summary

The rise and fall of Roman Britain, how they lived and what they left behind... In 55 B.C. Julius Caesar came, saw, conquered and then left. It was not until A.D. 43 that the Emperor Claudius crossed the channel and made Britain the western outpost of the Roman Empire that would span from the Scottish border to Persia. For the next 400 years the island would be transformed. Within that period would see the rise of Londinium, almost immediately burnt to the ground in A.D. 60 by Boudicca; Hadrian's Wall, which was constructed in A.D. 112 to keep the northern tribes at bay, as well as the birth of the Emperor Constantine in third century York. Interwoven with the historical narrative is a social history of the period showing how Roman society grew in Britain. Joan Alcock is a fellow of the University of South London. She is also the author of A Social History of Roman Britain, as well as A Social History of Ancient Rome.

©2011 Joan P. Alcock (P)2012 Audible Ltd

Narrator: Lisa Coleman
Length: 11 hrs and 44 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Empire of Ancient Rome

Empire of Ancient Rome

Summary

The influence of the Roman Empire has been widespread and profound, perhaps more so than that of any other empire or civilization. Rome laid the foundation for many of the institutions and ideas in the modern Western world, including the common political and legal systems. Roman ruins can still be found in distant England, and Roman aqueducts still bring fresh drinking water to modern Rome. Empire of Ancient Rome, Revised Edition opens with a brief summary of the Roman Empire and provides an account of the world and geographic area in the years leading up to the empire. In an easy-to-follow format, this volume covers the growth of Rome as a republic, the political and social forces that drove the transition to a dictatorship of caesars, the reasons for Rome's eventual decline, and what happened to the remnants of the empire. The book is published by Chelsea House Publishers, a leading publisher of educational material.

©2009 Infobase Publishing (P)2011 Redwood Audiobooks

Narrator: Adam Verner
Length: 4 hrs and 36 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The History of Rome, Volume 5: Books 33 - 39

The History of Rome, Volume 5: Books 33 - 39

2 ratings

Summary

Livy's purpose in writing his famous history was to show how Rome had started out as a city state full of brave, idealistic and virtuous citizens, but had then descended into the voracious, debauched, and immoral empire it had become by his own time in the late 1st century B.C. And the evidence was compelling. In volume five, Rome begins to confront the corrupt tyrannies and monarchies of Greece and the eastern Mediterranean. At first, her intention is simply to free the Greek cities from the yoke of bondage put in place by Philip of Macedon, Antiochus, and others. The task was all the more rewarding in that Philip and Antiochus had aided and abetted the Carthaginians earlier. But the thrill of liberation turns into the burden of empire as Rome assumes a role it cannot easily back away from. Soon, the protector of Greece becomes its jailor. And the corruption in the east moves west. Livy's The History of Rome continues in one additional volume. Translation: Roberts

Public Domain (P)2011 Audio Connoisseur

Length: 17 hrs and 30 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Greek Way

The Greek Way

3 ratings

Summary

"What the Greeks discovered, how they brought a new world to birth out of the dark confusions of an old world that had crumbled away, is full of meaning for us today who have seen an old world swept away." Based on a thorough study of Greek life and civilization, of Greek literature, philosophy, and art, The Greek Way interprets their meaning and brings a realization of the refuge and strength the past can be to us in the troubled present. Miss Hamilton's book must take its place with the few interpretative volumes which are permanently rooted and profoundly alive in our literature.

©1958 Edith Hamilton (P)1994 Blackstone Audiobooks

Narrator: Nadia May
Length: 8 hrs and 26 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The La Brea Tar Pits

The La Brea Tar Pits

Summary

Even at a distance, the acrid stench of asphalt and sulfur singes the hairs of people’s nostrils, and when the blustering winds subside, the potent miasma lingers in the air. To the untrained eye, the La Brea Tar Pits seem to be nothing more than simply pools of thick, viscous black sludge, its obsidian-like surface bestrewn with an assortment of autumn leaves and dirt. Gooey methane bubbles spurt up periodically, shattering the glassy veneer of the grease-black lakes, and the shiny bubbles swell to varying sizes and wiggle from side to side before popping, the sticky collapse almost reminiscent of cracking open a chocolate molten lava cake. This black sludge might seem rather unremarkable after a few moments, as it appears to just sit there in its idle state, but in fact, the seemingly innocuous bubbles are symptomatic of the treacly dark substance lurking on the bottom of the pit. The pit’s contents have spelled the doom for a countless number of creatures both large and small, from legions of insects to mighty mastodons, mammoths, and snarling saber-toothed cats from the Pleistocene Era. Of course, this is what makes the area a natural landmark in the first place, and today the La Brea Tar Pits are considered by many scientists to be among the greatest finds in modern history. Technically, these lustrous lakes of ink-black, while branded “tar,” are in actuality pools of asphalt seeps that have remained in place for several millennia, gushing forth from a natural subterranean petroleum spring underneath the city of Los Angeles known as the “Salt Lake Oil Field.” Needless to say, the tar pits are a far cry from the glittering, crystalline ponds cooled by the shade of surrounding palm trees found throughout the City of Angels. Indeed, the pungent reek of asphalt, pulsing methane bubbles, and their hauntingly black surfaces, making it impossible to gauge the true depth of the asphalt abysses, should have seemingly served as clear deterrents to the animals that roamed the vicinity prior to their entrapment. Instead, judging by the treasure trove of bones and remnants that have been uncovered within the pits, the sludge seemed to have figuratively emitted a siren song that no animal, regardless of stature or physical power, could resist. The disturbing and fascinating implications of the silent death traps, situated in what is now 5801 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, only further heightens their mystery. Evidence shows that the slow, torturous deaths of many of the creatures who became permanently ensnared in the asphalt quicksand were worsened by passing predators who essentially stumbled upon supper served on a sticky platter. Unfortunate, or rather, clumsy predators sometimes slipped, struggled, and were ultimately swallowed up by the tar pit themselves, creating a macabre, yet natural cycle of death and despair. Unsurprisingly, the La Brea Tar Pits have also become a wellspring of supernatural legends. According to one such legend, the disembodied, bone-chilling shrieks of a desperate woman, supposedly the La Brea Woman, victim of Los Angeles' oldest cold murder case, can still be heard in the dead of the night. More curious yet, these liquid time capsules are swaddled in another layer of mystique, its fossils not only solving mysterious riddles of a bygone age, but also offering up even more questions that are begging to be answered. The La Brea Tar Pits: The History and Legacy of One of the World’s Most Famous Fossil Sites looks at the geological origins of the area and analyzes the fossil finds from the tar. Along with pictures depicting important people, places, and events, you will learn about the tar pits like never before."

©2019 Charles River Editors (P)2020 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Bill Hare
Length: 1 hr and 30 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Search for the Ark of the Covenant

Search for the Ark of the Covenant

Summary

The search for the Ark of the Covenant has been dramatized in movies and researched in documentaries over the years, capturing the imaginations of archaeologists and Christians the world over. Although the final resting place of the Ark is controversial, and clouded with confusion, explorer Bob Cornuke believes that the Ark of the Covenant was transported from ancient Israel and is in Ethiopia today. As unusual as Ethiopia may sound, Cornuke has uncovered compelling evidence that the Ark may well have been spirited up the Nile River to an eventual resting place in the remote highlands of ancient Kush "modern Ethiopia". Cornuke travels to Axum, where today he believes the Ark is kept in absolute isolation at St. Mary of Zion Church by a man referred to as "The Guardian of the Ark of the Covenant". Now Bob, using all of his training and skills as a police investigator, takes you along for a first-hand account of his journey. Join this modern-day Indiana Jones on his adventure to Ethiopia, Egypt, Israel, and Rome where Bob will uncover evidence that very well may reveal where the Ark of the Covenant is today.

©2017 Koinonia House (P)2020 Koinonia House

Narrator: Gordon Russell
Author: Bob Cornuke
Length: 8 hrs and 28 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Die Olmeken [Olmecs]

Die Olmeken [Olmecs]

Summary

Wussten Sie, dass die Olmeken vielleicht das erste Volk waren, das die Schrift einführte? Das erste Volk, dem es gelang, sich zu einer Kultur zu entwickeln, waren die Olmeken. Aber warum sind sie bisher relativ unbekannt geblieben, versteckt in den langen, dunklen Korridoren der vergessenen Geschichte? Die Wahrheit ist, dass nur wenige Historiker bereit sind, sich der Aufgabe zu stellen, die wahre Geschichte der Olmeken zu entschlüsseln. Daher kann es selbst für interessierte Hörer schwierig sein, eine leicht verständliche und zusammenhängende Darstellung dieser faszinierenden Zivilisation zu finden. Aber das ändert sich gerade, denn in diesem neuen Band der Reihe Captivating History werden Sie die Wahrheit über die erste bekannte Zivilisation Amerikas erfahren. Die Olmeken: Ein Fesselnder Führer zu der Frühesten Bekannten Hochkultur in Mexiko bietet: Revolutionäre Erkenntnisse der modernen Methoden aus der Archäologie, Eine leicht verständliche Erklärung, wer die Olmeken waren und wo sie herkamen, Faszinierende Entdeckungen der olmekischen Kunst, Überraschende Theorien über die Struktur der olmekischen Gesellschaft und wie sie mit ihren Nachbarn interagierten, Die Wahrheit darüber, warum die Olmeken so reich waren und die Hauptgründe für ihren Erfolg, Alles, was über das olmekische Militär bekannt ist, Erstaunliche Einsichten in den Alltag der Olmeken, Einblicke in Religion und Glaubensvorstellungen und in welcher Weise sie eine wesentliche Rolle in der olmekischen Gesellschaft spielten, Einen Überblick über bemerkenswerte Innovationen der Olmeken, Und vieles, vieles mehr! Wenn Sie also mehr über die Olmeken erfahren wollen, kaufen si jetzt dieses Hörbuch an. Please note: This audiobook is in German.

©2020 Captivating History (P)2020 Captivating History

Length: 2 hrs and 17 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for When Life Nearly Died

When Life Nearly Died

2 ratings

Summary

Today it is common knowledge that the dinosaurs were wiped out by a meteorite impact 65 million years ago that killed half of all species then living. It is far less widely understood that a much greater catastrophe took place at the end of the Permian period 251 million years ago: at least 90 percent of life on earth was destroyed. When Life Nearly Died documents not only what happened during this gigantic mass extinction, but also the recent renewal of the idea of catastrophism: the theory that changes in the earth's crust were brought about suddenly in the past by phenomena that cannot be observed today. Was the end-Permian event caused by the impact of a huge meteorite or comet or by prolonged volcanic eruption in Siberia? The evidence has been accumulating, and Michael J. Benton gives his verdict at the end of the volume. The new edition brings the study of the greatest mass extinction of all time thoroughly up-to-date. In the years since the book was originally published, hundreds of geologists and paleontologists have been investigating all aspects of how life could be driven to the brink of annihilation, and especially how life recovered afterward, providing the foundations of modern ecosystems.

©2003, 2008, 2015 Thames & Hudson Ltd (P)2020 Tantor

Narrator: Julian Elfer
Length: 11 hrs and 33 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for A History of the Roman Republic, Volume 2

A History of the Roman Republic, Volume 2

1 rating

Summary

By the middle of the second century B.C., the Roman Republic has been changed completely from the sober and virtuous character of the previous generations of self-sacrificing soldier-farmers. Rome has become a wealthy, diverse metropolis of many conflicting interests. The influence of Hellenism, while on the whole beneficial to the educated caste, has proved ruinous to the morals of the man on the street, who has joined an insatiable mob. But a greedy and power hungry faction of wealthy capitalists and nobles begin to use the Roman mob to promote their own selfish interests. Meanwhile, the immense expansion of Roman territory to include the entire Mediterranean has brought into being a complex bureaucratic apparatus which the fractious Senate is incapable of running. Bribery, graft, and wholesale theft by unscrupulous governors provokes armed rebellion in many provinces. At Rome, the mob has become accustomed to an expensive welfare system which threatens the state's financial powers. Into this dreadful state of affairs steps one of history's bravest reformers, Tiberius Gracchus. Along with his brother, Caius, these two will introduce, beginning in 133 B.C., a series of political and economic reforms which unleashes over a hundred years of massive civil unrest and devastating civil war. The chaos is finally brought to an end with the accession to power of Octavian in 30 B.C., and with him comes an Imperial tyranny that spells the end of an ancient form of government known as the Roman Republic. Enjoy Cyril Robinson's superbly written historical masterpiece, a crowning achievement by the greatest historian of the 20th century.

(P)2005 Audio Connoisseur

Length: 11 hrs and 8 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Influence of Pythagoras on Freemasonry

The Influence of Pythagoras on Freemasonry

1 rating

Summary

Renowned Masonic scholar Albert G. Mackey examines the role Pythagoras has played in our fraternity. He begins by examining old records and the potential origin of how the Masonic name "Peter Gower" became a synonym for Pythagoras. He points to an early Masonic reference of Pythagoras and Hermes, dating to 1450, while at the same time pointing out that many of the much later documents are devoid of his name altogether. From there, Mackey explores the history of Pythagoras and what he may have symbolized to some early masons, which would have encouraged them to adopt aspects of the famed initiate Pythagoras into the overall Masonic lore.

©2018 Lamp of Trismegistus (P)2018 Lamp of Trismegistus

Narrator: Michael Strader
Length: 39 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Apollo

Apollo

Summary

"Foolish mortals and poor drudges are you, that you seek cares and hard toils and straits! Easily will I tell you a word and set it in your hearts. Though each one of you with knife in hand should slaughter sheep continually, yet would you always have abundant store, even all that the glorious tribes of men bring here for me. But guard you my temple and receive the tribes of men that gather to this place, and especially show mortal men my will, and do you keep righteousness in your heart." "Apollo's history is a confusing one," said the renowned poet and mythologist Robert Graves. This notion is also illustrated in the above quote from the sixth century BCE Homeric Hymn to Apollo, which gives the listener a brief glimpse into the confusion surrounding Apollo's multi-faceted nature. The quote comes from the end of an episode in which Apollo is traversing the known world, looking for a place to build a temple to himself. Once he lands upon a place of his liking, however, he realizes that he needs to populate it with priests who would "guard" and care for its ceremonies. Rather than depend upon those "glorious tribes" to supply his temple with sycophants, Apollo has no patience for chance, and flies down to a Cretan merchant ship, landing on it in the form of a timber-shaking dolphin. After terrifying the merchants, he tells them that their lives in the sea trade are over, and they are to be priests at his temple from then on. Cautioning the merchants to eschew piracy and "keep righteousness" in their hearts, while simultaneously confronting and sequestering them captures the youthful god's capricious character quite well.

©2017 Charles River Editors (P)2017 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Mark Norman
Length: 1 hr and 43 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Storia di Roma

Storia di Roma

1 rating

Summary

La storia di Roma racconta la parabola del più grande impero occidentale con la scrittura affilata che ha negli anni appassionato - e appassiona tutt'ora - i lettori di Indro Montanelli. Abile, la penna dell'autore ripercorre i rivolgimenti culturali e politici della società romana dalle sue origini al crollo dell'impero, unendo alla sempre precisa cronaca degli eventi, ritratti vivaci delle figure che di Roma hanno incarnato la storia.  Il risultato è un racconto coinvolgente e scevro da accademismi, che invita a conoscere meglio il passato e, allo stesso tempo, a riflettere sul mondo contemporaneo. Dalle guerre puniche all'affermazione del Cristianesimo, dall'austerità di Catone al magnetismo di Giulio Cesare fino agli eccessi di imperatori come Nerone o Eliogabalo, dallo stoicismo delle origini alla decadenza del tardo impero.

©2018 Rizzoli (P)2018 Rizzoli

Narrator: Valerio Amoruso
Length: 13 hrs and 41 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Ancient Rome: A Concise Overview of the Roman History and Mythology Including the Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire

Ancient Rome: A Concise Overview of the Roman History and Mythology Including the Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire

2 ratings

Summary

Explore the history and mythology of the Roman Empire! Few societies and historical periods capture our fascination as much as ancient Rome. With a founding steeped in legend, along with the rise and fall of a monarchy, a republic, and an empire filled with colorful, and often even bizarre, leaders and popular figures, it is no wonder that it has been the source of inspiration for a multitude of novels, movies, and television shows. While this entertainment fare has had varying degrees of historical accuracy, a great deal of artistic license does not need to be taken to make the story of ancient Rome intriguing and scintillating. It was a society and a people rich with a drama that still captures our interest even today, more than 1,500 years since the fall of the great Roman Empire. In this audiobook you are going to find out about:   The founding and rise of the Roman Republic The era of an empire The Christianization of the empire and its impact The masterpiece of Rome How it becomes a melting pot of theism And more... Don’t wait another moment to enjoy from this information - buy your copy of Ancient Rome right away!

©2018 Eric Brown (P)2018 Eric Brown

Narrator: John B Leen
Author: Eric Brown
Length: 1 hr and 43 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Mayapan: The History of the Mayan Capital

Mayapan: The History of the Mayan Capital

Summary

Many ancient civilizations have influenced and inspired people in the 21st century, like the Greeks and the Romans, but of all the world's civilizations, none have intrigued people more than the Mayans, whose culture, astronomy, language, and mysterious disappearance all continue to captivate people. At the heart of the fascination is Chichén Itzá, the most visited Mayan site, but Chichén Itzá's prominence lasted for less than 200 years and was eventually succeeded by Mayapán, which lasted as the capital of the Maya for nearly 225 years until the middle of the 15th century. The Mayans are still remembered and celebrated for their culture and their contributions to astronomy, language, and sports, and many of their advancements came with Mayapán as their capital. Early Mayapán was closely connected to the overshadowing power of the region at the time: the mighty trading city of Chichén Itzá. Mayapán emerged first as a minor settlement in the orbit of Chichén, but it slowly came to replace it after the larger city's trade connections with the Toltecs of Tula crumbled and it suffered a staggering defeat by Mayapán's armies. The building styles and art in their city show both admiring references to the great Chichén Itzá as well as an attempt to position Mayapán as a more orthodox heir of Maya tradition. At the same time, they emulated many features and could not escape the tremendous influences - especially in religion - of Chichén. This is seen in the fact that many of the most important buildings in the new city appear to be small-scale reproductions of ones in Chichén.

©2012 Charles River Editors (P)2015 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Michael Gilboe
Length: 1 hr and 6 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Antigua Roma [Ancient Rome]

Antigua Roma [Ancient Rome]

Summary

Si quiere descubrir historias cautivadoras de personas y eventos de la antigua Roma, entonces siga leyendo.... La civilización romana es probablemente la civilización más importante de la historia del planeta. Su expansión definió a Europa. Su constitución formó sociedades desde Rusia en el este hasta los Estados Unidos y América Latina en el oeste. Ni siquiera sus conquistadores fueron inmunes a la cultura romana superior. En este nuevo libro de historia cautivadora, aprenderá todo lo que necesita saber sobre las instituciones y la política romana. Estos son algunos de los temas tratados en laAntigua Roma: Una introducción fascinante a la República Romana, El ascenso y la caída del Imperio Romano y el Imperio bizantino: Los siete reyes de las siete colinas: la fundación de Roma y sus primeros gobernantes La República Naciente Las guerras púnicas y la dominación mediterránea: la República Media Decadencia, corrupción y guerras civiles: Finales de la República Cayo Julio César, cruzando el Rubicón y la muerte que sacudió la ciudad El ascenso del primer emperador romano Principios del Imperio romano: Princeps Augustus y Dinastía Julio-Claudia La Dinastía Flavia La Dinastía Antonina Finales del Imperio El imperio deConstantino Dinastía Constantiniana Decadencia y caída del Imperio romano occidental El milenio bizantino ¡Y mucho, mucho más! ¡Obtenga este libro ahora para conocer más sobre la antigua Roma! Please note: This audiobook is in Spanish.

©2019 Captivating History (P)2019 Captivating History

Length: 2 hrs and 32 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Attila the Hun

Attila the Hun

Summary

If you want to discover the captivating history of Attila the Hun, then look no further.... In the popular imagination, Attila the Hun is among the most barbaric leaders ever. His warriors have the reputation of being ruthless, cruel, and bloodthirsty, as the Huns are believed to have been savages lacking any semblance of civilized culture.  The Huns raped and pillaged with abandon whenever the opportunity arose, and their raids into lands poorly protected by military outposts in the crumbling Roman Empire became legendary. The Huns under the command of Attila are thought to have been largely responsible for the collapse of the Roman Empire and the commencement of the Dark Ages in Europe.  The reputation of Attila and his people, the Huns, is at odds with reality. But examining the few historical records of his character and deeds reveal quite a different story. It is true that he was a calculating leader who was skilled at unleashing his fierce fighters when necessary. It is also recorded in history that he was a continual thorn in the side of the Romans. However, placed in historical context, Attila acted in ways that were common among leaders, both Roman and barbarian, in the first half of the fifth century. What is extraordinary about him were his uncanny abilities in negotiations with superior powers, his capacity for matching and exceeding his enemies in duplicitous behavior, and his successes as a military tactician on the battlefield.  In Attila the Hun: A Captivating Guide to the Ruler of the Huns and His Invasions of the Roman Empire, you will discover topics such as: The origins of Attila and the Huns The wars of the Huns before Attila An alliance between the Huns and the Romans Attila attacks the Byzantines Attila attacks the Byzantines Aagain Attila foils a Byzantine plot Attila’s diplomatic strategy evolves in the West Attila raids Gaul Attila raids Italy The disintegration of Attila’s kingdom And much, much more! So if you want to learn more about Attila the Hun, scroll up and click the "Buy Now" button!

©2020 Captivating History (P)2020 Captivating History

Narrator: Randy Whitlow
Length: 1 hr and 32 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Saber-Toothed Tigers

Saber-Toothed Tigers

Summary

“Unrelenting angst through every fiber  Forever hanging over the precipice of defeat  It follows you: a rapacious saber-toothed tiger  Implacable stare, neither attacks nor retreats...” (Tom Quigley, Savanna Mind (2016))  It is difficult to ignore the effortless cool of a saber-toothed tiger. The fanged feline was equipped with the savage strength of a lion, the lethal stealth of a puma, the intimidating gait of a black bear, and the strapping, muscular arms of a gorilla. Amazingly, however, those traits did not stand out as much as the long, dagger-like fangs that earned the Smilodon its famous nickname. The saber-toothed tiger, legend has it, was as ferocious as it was fearless, often tackling beasts twice its size.  Saber-toothed tigers were arguably the most fabled of all the Ice Age creatures. The fearsome beast has earned itself quite the reputation, and it has been referenced to, appeared in, and inspired unique characters in endless books, films, comics, and other pop culture mediums.  For example, Marvel's Victor Creed, otherwise known as “Sabretooth”, is most known as Wolverine's nemesis, and he’s depicted as a hulking, vigorously robust menace in a red and orange-gold jumpsuit with a hunched back, a shock of wild blond hair, tiger-like claws, and frightening fangs. As that indicates, the prehistoric creature is often portrayed as impossibly cunning, unfeeling villains. Even in films geared toward children, such as the first of the Ice Age animations, the saber-toothed tigers, excluding Diego, are depicted as vicious and vindictive, lawless fiends whose sights are set on a Neanderthal toddler.  The name and reputation of the ruthless saber-toothed tiger, as enduring as it is chilling, overshadows those of its contemporaries, and the fanged feline remains a household name and one of the foremost symbols of the Ice Age to this very day.  So, what is it about the Smilodon that has captured - and continues to capture - the fears, morbid curiosities, hearts, minds, and imaginations of Holocene humans after all this time? And exactly how accurate is the general public's perception and understanding of the saber-toothed tiger? Moreover, if these saber-toothed beasts were indeed as merciless and indomitable as they are often portrayed, what was it that snuffed them out of existence? Saber-Toothed Tigers: The History and Legacy of the Most Famous Extinct Cat Species looks at the origins of the famous cats, the fossil finds, and theories regarding their extinction.

©2020 Charles River Editors (P)2020 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Daniel Houle
Length: 1 hr and 55 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Breve historia del Imperio bizantino

Breve historia del Imperio bizantino

Summary

Generalmente se nos suele enseñar la Edad Media como una etapa de oscuridad marcada por guerras continuas entre señores feudales y por un cristianismo hermético. Un estudio a fondo nos demostrará que no es una imagen completa, ya que sólo tiene en cuenta el ojo occidental. Breve Historia del Imperio Bizantino nos presenta la historia del otro lado, la historia de la Edad Media vista desde un imperio majestuoso que supo conservar, desde su inexpugnable capital Constantinopla, durante más de un milenio los valores y la cultura del antiguo Imperio romano.  El libro arranca en el S. III a. C. para ponernos en antecedentes acerca de la ruptura del Imperio romano en dos, el de Oriente y el de Occidente, sólo comprendiendo esto seremos capaces de aceptar que cuando se habla de la caída del Imperio romano, es el de Occidente el que cae, el Imperio oriental resiste, y su destino corre paralelo a la Edad Media. El Imperio Bizantino será no un nuevo imperio, sino la prolongación del Imperio romano hasta la modernidad. Conocer sus relaciones con los otomanos, o la influencia de las Cruzadas en Oriente, conocer las relaciones del Papa de Roma con el Emperador de Constantinopla, que desembocan en el cisma entre la Iglesia Católica y la Ortodoxa, o presenciar la decadencia de la dinastía Macedónica y la destrucción de Constantinopla, es conocer la Edad Media en toda su complejidad.  Una historia apasionante sobre un Imperio que, en medio de la tumultuosa y bélica Edad Media, supo crear una ciudad invencible, que resistió el ataque de los mejores ejércitos, y en la que, los valores del Imperio romano resistieron mil años y entraron de lleno en la modernidad.

©2010 Ediciones Nowtilus S.L. (P)2020 Audible Studios

Narrator: Charo Soria
Length: 8 hrs and 36 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for 100 citazioni di Marco Aurelio

100 citazioni di Marco Aurelio

Summary

Queste 100 citazioni mirano a fornire l'accesso a un'opera o a una vita eccezionale, attraverso una selezione dei pensieri più eclatanti, in un formato accessibile a tutti. Una citazione è più di un estratto di un'affermazione, può essere un colpo di mente, una sintesi di un pensiero complesso, una massima, un'apertura a una riflessione più profonda. Si dice che certe frasi possono cambiare la vita. Altri ragioneranno dentro di voi per un tempo infinito, facendo eco a una personale ricerca intellettuale o spirituale.

©2020 Compagnie du Savoir (P)2020 Compagnie du Savoir

Length: 27 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for La Guerre du Feu

La Guerre du Feu

Summary

"Les Oulhamr fuyaient dans la nuit épouvantable. Fous de souffrance et de fatigue, tout leur semblait vain devant la calamité suprême : le Feu était mort. Ils l'élevaient dans trois cages, depuis l'origine de la horde ; quatre femmes et deux guerriers le nourrissaient nuit et jour. (...) Sa face puissante éloignait le lion noir et le lion jaune, l'ours des cavernes et l'ours gris, le mammouth, le tigre et le léopard ; ses dents rouges protégeaient l'homme contre le vaste monde." Ça se passe il y a cent mille ans, le monde est sauvage, les rivalités entre les hommes sont impitoyables, et leur bien le plus précieux est le Feu. Le clan des Oulhamrs sait entretenir le feu mais ne sait pas l'allumer. Sans feu, ils sont condamnés. Naoh, fils du léopard, se propose de reconquérir la précieuse flamme, pour la survie de son espèce et l'amour d'une fille à belle chevelure. Avec deux jeunes guerriers, il part explorer des territoires inconnus hantés de bêtes féroces et de hordes humaines hostiles... Paru en 1911, La Guerre du Feu a été adapté au cinéma par J-J Annaud.

© Editions Sonobook

Length: 6 hrs and 56 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Byzantine Empire: A History from Beginning to End

Byzantine Empire: A History from Beginning to End

Summary

According to history books, the Roman Empire ended in 476 CE with the fall of Rome. But if you asked most people alive at that time, they would have pointed you to what they considered the continuation of the Roman Empire - the civilization we now call the Byzantine Empire. The Byzantines, however, were more than just a remnant of Roman glory. At its geographical peak, the Byzantine Empire stretched out across the Mediterranean world. Culturally, the Byzantines both preserved the knowledge of the classical world, much of which was lost in the West, and added to it. Inside you will hear about.... A Divided Empire The Fall of the West Rising to Glory An Age of War The Destruction of Icons The House of Macedon The Comnenian Revival The Final Decline And much more! Shaped by its classical roots, its Christian religion, and the changing medieval world, the story of the Byzantine Empire is one of both glorious victories and terrible defeats, of a civilization that rose from the brink of destruction again and again, and of the development of a culture whose vestiges remain today.

©2018 Hourly History (P)2018 Hourly History

Narrator: Jimmy Kieffer
Length: 1 hr and 9 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Mysteries of the Sea

Mysteries of the Sea

Summary

Water covers the vast majority of the planet, and people have looked upon the oceans for thousands of years with a mixture of awe and fear. The world’s water offers transportation, connections with distant lands, food, and beauty. Furthermore, the deep seas and oceans remain largely unexplored, especially farther below. All of these factors have led to centuries worth of mysteries and stories. Countless people have ventured out on those vast expanses of water, never to return, while others have plumbed the depths and made strange discoveries. The oceans of the world offer no end of intrigue, and people have long been living and telling some of the strangest tales ever heard on the high seas. Mysteries of the Sea: A Collection of Lost Ships, Supernatural Stories, and Other Odd Tales Underneath the Waves chronicles some of the most interesting stories associated with the planet’s oceans. You will learn about mysteries of the sea like never before.

©2019 Charles River Editors (P)2019 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Jim D. Johnston
Length: 2 hrs and 21 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Boudica: The Life and Legacy of the Celtic Queen Who Rebelled Against the Romans in Britain

Boudica: The Life and Legacy of the Celtic Queen Who Rebelled Against the Romans in Britain

1 rating

Summary

The famous conqueror from the European continent came ashore with thousands of men, ready to set up a new kingdom in England. The Britons had resisted the amphibious invasion from the moment his forces landed, but he was able to push forward. In a large winter battle, the Britons’ large army attacked the invaders but was eventually routed, and the conqueror was able to set up a new kingdom. Over 1,100 years before William the Conqueror became the king of England after the Battle of Hastings, Julius Caesar came, saw, and conquered part of “Britannia”, setting up a Roman province with a puppet king in 54 BCE. In the new province, the Romans eventually constructed a military outpost overlooking a bridge across the River Thames. The new outpost was named Londinium, and it covered just over two dozen acres. Londinium had become the largest city in Britannia shortly before being burned down in a native revolt led by an infamous Celtic Iceni queen named Boudica. With a name meaning “Victory”, Boudica was a charismatic woman who commanded nearly 100,000 Celts and led them on a campaign to expel the Roman overlords from Britain around the year 61 CE. Often called the “Celtic Queen”, she wore a warrior’s necklace around her delicate neck and rode upon a sturdy steed. According to the ancient historian Cassius Dio, “In stature, she was very tall, in appearance most terrifying, in the glance of her eye most fierce, and her voice was harsh.” It is said she had a piercing glare that could shrink her people’s enemies, which in this case were the Roman legionnaires under the vengeful general Suetonius. Boudica was not only a woman of high intelligence but also a Druid priestess of great repute, which caused the Romans a unique kind of concern. The Celts have fascinated people for centuries, and the biggest fascination of all has been over the Druids, a religious class at the heart of Celtic society that wielded great power. Naturally, people have been interested in Druids for centuries mostly because they don’t understand much about the Druids or their practices. The word comes from the Romans, who labeled them "Druidae" in reference to the white robed order of Celtic priests living in Gaul, Britain, and Ireland. They were a well-organized, secretive group who kept no written records and performed their rituals - allegedly including human sacrifice - in oaken groves, all of which interested and horrified Roman writers.

©2019 Charles River Editors (P)2019 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Colin Fluxman
Length: 3 hrs
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Birth of Classical Europe

The Birth of Classical Europe

Summary

To an extraordinary extent we continue to live in the shadow of the classical world. At every level, from languages to calendars to political systems, we are the descendants of a “classical Europe,” using frames of reference created by ancient Mediterranean cultures. As this consistently fresh and surprising new audio book makes clear, however, this was no less true for the inhabitants of those classical civilizations themselves, whose myths, history, and buildings were an elaborate engagement with an already old and revered past - one filled with great leaders and writers, emigrations and battles. Indeed, much of the reason we know so much about the classical past is because of the obsessive importance it held for so many generations of Greeks and Romans, who interpreted and reinterpreted their changing casts of heroes and villains. Figures such as Alexander the Great and Augustus Caesar loom large in our imaginations today, but they themselves were fascinated by what had preceded them. A stunning work of research and imagination, The Birth of Classical Europe is an authoritative history, covering two millennia of human experience and casting new light on the world that in many ways still defines our own. In their thoughtful look at the twin engines of memory and culture, Simon Price and Peter Thonemann show how our own changing values and interests have shaped our feelings about an era that is by some measures very remote but by others startlingly close.

©2011 Simon Price, Peter Thonemann (P)2011 Gildan Media Corp

Narrator: Don Hagen
Length: 14 hrs and 47 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Die Kultur der Zapoteken [The Zapotec Culture]

Die Kultur der Zapoteken [The Zapotec Culture]

Summary

Entdecken Sie die fesselnde Geschichte der Kultur der Zapoteken Die Kultur der Zapoteken lebte und blühte und weckte das Interesse der spanischen Konquistadoren. Als eine der größten mesoamerikanischen Zivilisationen jener Zeit trugen sie dazu bei die Welt, die die Konquistadoren bei ihrer Ankunft vorfanden, zu formen und zu gestalten. In Größe und Komplexität ihrer Gesellschaft nahmen sie es mit ihren Nachbarn, den Maya, auf. Sie waren Erneuerer und Intellektuelle, die eine Gesellschaft schufen, die den Königreichen und Sozialstrukturen der Maya sehr ähnlich war.  Die Zapoteken waren ein faszinierendes Volk und dieses Buch versucht, einen frischen Blick auf eine Kultur zu werfen, die ebenso komplex, strukturiert und majestätisch war wie jedes ihrer mesoamerikanischen, südamerikanischen oder europäischen Pendants.   Die Themen dieses Buches sind:   Das Wolkenvolk und sein Gebiet Das Tal von Oaxaca Das Verständnis der Zapoteken und die Gründung von Monte Albán und seine Phasen Landwirtschaftliche Anfänge und die Entwicklung der Zivilisation Religion, Mythen, Opfer, Rituale und Macht Die Königliche Familie und ihre Angehörigen Die religiöse Ordnung Ein Tag im Leben der Zapoteken Die Künste, Sport und Technologie Der Krieg gegen die Azteken Die Ankunft der Konquistadoren Der Niedergang des Reichs … und vieles mehr, das Sie nicht verpassen möchten! Kaufen Sie das Buch jetzt und erfahren Sie mehr über die Kultur der Zapoteken! Please note: This audiobook is in German.

©2020 Captivating History (P)2021 Captivating History

Length: 2 hrs and 13 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Byzantine Empire

The Byzantine Empire

Summary

If you want to discover captivating stories of people and events of the Byzantine Empire then keep reading.... The Byzantine Empire was founded during the chaotic third century. It was the time when revolts and civil wars were common, and Roman emperors merely lasted for a year. Despite being one of the most captivating historical periods of all time, the Byzantine Empire is a lesser known one, and it's rare to find an exciting resource on the topic.  But that is about to change. In this new captivating history audiobook, you will:   Explore a story of power and glory, anarchy and order, paganism and Christianity, war and peace, the West and the East Get familiar with the roots of the greatest controversies that defined the history of Europe and the entirety of Western civilization - the conflict between the Catholic and Orthodox churches, and the one between Christianity and Islam  Discover stories of remarkable emperors you’ve never heard of and about the astonishing bravery of Graeco-Roman heroes such as Constantine Dragases, who resisted the Ottomans until the end, and Belisarius, who fought the Persians to reconquer what used to be the Western Empire Learn more about the entire era called the Byzantine Empire in less time compared to studying boring textbooks All this and much more awaits you, so get instant access now by downloading now!

©2018 Captivating History (P)2018 Captivating History

Narrator: Duke Holm
Length: 2 hrs and 25 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Greek Mythology: Gods, Heroes and the Trojan War of Greek Mythology

Greek Mythology: Gods, Heroes and the Trojan War of Greek Mythology

Summary

Greek Mythology Gods, Heroes and the Trojan War The Greek Mythology is indeed unparalleled in its engrossing appeal. To date, it serves to be an inspiration to box office hit movies, literature and much more. The fact that Greek Mythology, with its genesis in antiquity, can continue to fascinate generations of the modern world is remarkable in itself, but so are the many intriguing characters such as Zeus, Apollo, Aphrodite, Artemis, Ares and Athena. Inside you will learn about…  The Twelve Titans The Twelve Olympians The Heroes of Greek Mythology The Trojan War Ten Little Known Facts about Greek Mythology Although a simulacrum of the historic literary pieces of Homer and Hesiod, this eBook gives a crisp yet fulfilling account of the Titans, the Olympian gods, their affairs, feuds and rivalries; it provides a through account of the Trojan war and heroes such as Achilles, Hercules and Odysseus. It also includes bonus chapters divulging some enthralling secrets that are less known about the characters of the Greek Mythology. This is a reservoir of the many enchanting chronicles of Greek legends.

©2015 Stephan Weaver (P)2017 Stephan Weaver

Narrator: D. Michael Hope
Length: 1 hr and 9 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Tales of Old

Tales of Old

Summary

King Arthur wanted to search for the holy grail because it gave immortality. We will never know if King Arthur existed, but, in a way, he did achieve immortality. We are still talking about him after all these years.  Arthur is a historic sacred figure to many British, embodying all their aspirations of nobility, honor, and goodness. The stories of the past are connected to each other. Everything that has ever happened since the beginning of time - the stars, the constellations - have been witnessing everything. The Greeks called those constellations Draco and Ursa Major, the Romans gave them the names Scorpio and the Big dipper.

©2019 Gabriel Ramirez (P)2020 Gabriel Ramirez

Narrator: Diontae Black
Length: 1 hr and 16 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Domestication of Cats

The Domestication of Cats

Summary

Mankind's obsession with felines is an enigma in and of itself. Unlike dogs, famously known as man's most excitable, trustworthy, and loyal friend, cats are oftentimes indifferent, guarded, and yet finicky little furry creatures that only yearn for attention and affection when one is neck-deep in work or otherwise preoccupied. And still, people adore them all the same. In a recent poll that surveyed 600 American college students, 60 percent of the participants identified themselves as “dog lovers” whereas only 11 percent pledged their love for cats. The remaining 29 percent regarded themselves as fans of both critters or fans of neither. Be that as it may, there is said to be anywhere between a staggering 88 - 94 million pet cats in the United States alone, which eclipses the roughly 84 - 90 million pet dogs in the country. In the same breath, while more households around the world share a roof with a canine companion, as reflected in the results of this particular survey and most other similar polls, more cat owners have taken it upon themselves to look after more than one pet. This just goes to show that the passion that cat lovers have for their feline friends is evidently comparable with, if not arguably greater than that of dog lovers as a whole. The Domestication of Cats: The History of the Only Domesticated Felidae Species and Their Relationship with Humans examines the origins of this exceptional bond, including scientific and mythical theories, and explores how cats were domesticated.

©2020 Charles River Editors (P)2020 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Daniel Houle
Length: 1 hr and 45 mins
Available on Audible
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History of the Romans

Summary

The bundle is here! You will learn more about Romans, Vestal Virgins, emperors, prostitution, civil rights, the building of Rome, the dealings with other peoples, wars, contentions, slaves, rebellion, and much, much more. This three-in-one book bundle will serve you well. Take advantage get it now!

©2019 Ron Carver (P)2020 Ron Carver

Narrator: Brandon Woodall
Author: Ron Carver
Length: 12 hrs and 1 min
Available on Audible
Cover art for Historia Maya [Maya History]

Historia Maya [Maya History]

Summary

¿Sabías que los mayas usaban las saunas con fines curativos?  En la última década o dos, ha habido un aumento de interés en la historia maya. Esto fue en parte alimentado por la mítica predicción maya del fin del mundo en 2012, que por un corto período de tiempo puso a esta civilización bajo la atención de los medios de comunicación.  Pero hay mucho más en su cultura que la idea errónea común sobre su calendario.  Historia Maya: Una fascinante guía de la civilización, cultura, mitología y el impacto de los pueblos mayas en la historia de Mesoamérica incluye:  Hallazgos revolucionarios proporcionados por modernas técnicas de detección arqueológica Una simple explicación de la civilización maya y su ubicación Descubrimientos fascinantes del arte maya Notable perspicacia en el gobierno y la sociedad maya Una sorprendente exploración de la vida cotidiana de los mayas Una visión asombrosa de los mitos, leyendas, dioses y creencias del pueblo maya, incluyendo hallazgos impactantes relacionados con el sacrificio humano La guerra La conquista española y su impacto Desde la época colonial hasta hoy Y mucho, ¡mucho más! ¡Obtenga este libro ahora para aprender más sobre la historia maya! Please note: This audiobook is in Spanish. 

©2020 Captivating History (P)2020 Captivating History

Length: 4 hrs and 50 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Weird Rome

Weird Rome

Summary

"Rome was a poem pressed into service as a city.” In that short line, Anatole Broyard, a 20th century American writer, compactly captures the timeless and enchanting beauty that resides within the Eternal City of Rome. This tourist destination is often one of the highest ranked on bucket lists, for how could one not want to experience its marvelous ruins, mirror-like rivers, and spectacular stretches of aqueducts, firsthand? As one sips on fine Italian wine on a terrace overlooking the grand remnants of the Colosseum, one can practically hear the roars of the battling gladiators and the raucous applause of the spectators. And as one strolls through the coarse yet quaint cobblestone streets, one can almost hear the galloping horses and screeching wheels of chariots in the distance, and even feel the brush of the breeze as they charge past. It is difficult not to fall in love with a city so effortlessly nostalgic, it verges on utopian. The ambitious and fearless emperors who built the legendary Roman Empire from scratch, the broad-shouldered and bronzed gladiators with their iconic plume helmets and glinting swords, and elaborate parties attended by toga-wearing Romans fueled by alcohol, violence, orgies, and other godless acts all paint a picture of Roman life. Indeed, many people are well-versed with these unique scenes of Roman history, but few are familiar with the equally riveting years preceding the dawn of the Roman Republic, and even less people are acquainted with the fabled Seven Hills sitting east of the Tiber River - the core geographical components of Rome and the very foundations that the Eternal City was built on.  Ancient Rome is understandably an object of enduring fascination, and its legacy still survives today, especially in the West, where Roman architecture, law, and philosophy all influence modern societies. But the Romans were also startlingly different - a deeply superstitious society, they believed in all sorts of omens and magic spells, while their leaders were capable of cruelties that would make a modern war criminal blush. Regular Romans performed strange religious practices, and they engaged in even stranger sexual practices. Weird Rome: A Collection of Mysterious Stories, Odd Anecdotes, and Strange Superstitions from the Ancient Romans looks at the more bizarre sides of Roman civilization, helping people understand the true nature of Rome and examining aspects that documentaries and museum exhibitions tend to gloss over. Learn about the weirder parts of Rome like never before.

©2020 Charles River Editors (P)2020 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Daniel Houle
Length: 2 hrs and 13 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Peace Be with You!

Peace Be with You!

Summary

This is the story of Rome during the fourth century in the time of its 57th emperor, the first Christian ruler, Flavius Valerius Constantinus, who later was called Augustus - the man known to posterity as a saint and as Constantine the Great. His life and work was the object of study for countless historians, yet most of them missed to discover the man under the purple imperial robes. This audiobook tries to fill in some of the missing aspects necessary to reconstruct his true portrait. He was not a perfect man - by any standards - just the right man, at the right place, at the right time. This is the story of a Christian Liberator. If there strong similarities between the ancient Rome and the contemporary Washington, DC, they are only coincidental, since the author did not make any efforts to describe them, abstaining from pointing them to you as flukes of history, even though, sometimes the history may repeat itself!

©2014 Julian Chitta (P)2014 Julian Chitta

Narrator: Justin Harmer
Length: 4 hrs and 35 mins
Available on Audible
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Lords of Sipan

Summary

This is the riveting true story of grave robbers who discovered and plundered Sipan Temple, and Dr. Walter Alva, the resourceful, strong-willed archaeologist who attempts to excavate the remains of the site while under siege by smugglers and collectors. Archaeology buffs as well as adventure-novel listeners will delight in this true-crime thriller.

©2005 Sidney D. Kirkpatrick (P)2007 Recorded Books

Narrator: John McDonough
Length: 8 hrs and 38 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for History: The Greatest Empires That Defined Our World

History: The Greatest Empires That Defined Our World

Summary

There is so much history to the world. However, in this book we cover the extensive past of three huge and great empires. Those include the Roman Empire, the Persian Empire, and the Mongol Empire. All three had great rises, and then had great falls. One was outlived, while another is known as the greatest of all empires. Which one is which? Listen to find out and grow your knowledge on the rich past of all three empires. Here is a preview of what you'll learn... The Roman Empire The Mongols The Persians And much, much more! Download your copy today!

©2016 Robert Paulson (P)2016 Robert Paulson

Length: 1 hr and 22 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Barbarians Within the Gates of Rome

Barbarians Within the Gates of Rome

Summary

A major work on Roman policy toward the barbarians during one of the most exciting and challenging periods in the history of the Roman Empire, when barbarian soldiers became part of the forces defending the Roman frontier and gradually its rulers. By the close of these five decades, the Western Empire - hence Western Civilization - had changed forever. A Selection of the History Book Club.

©1994 Thomas A. Burns (P)2015 Redwood Audiobooks

Narrator: Charles Craig
Length: 14 hrs and 50 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Woolly Mammoths

Woolly Mammoths

Summary

It was a frosty, wintry September morning in 2012 when 11-year-old Yevgeny “Zhenya” Salinder donned his warmest quilted jacket, a knitted woolen cap, and matching mittens and headed out the door with his faithful, tail-wagging dogs in tow.  Like most mornings, the kid ambled about near the Sopkarga polar weather station, an isolated region in the northern Russian Taymyr Peninsula where he resided, but this particular morning, his pace was slowed by a foul, almost eye-watering stench.  Intrigued, Salinder and the dogs sniffed out the source of the strange miasma, and in the process, they stumbled upon a defrosted pair of heels from an unknown creature protruding from the cold earth. When young Salinder relayed what he had found to his parents, they alerted the authorities, but initially, nobody had the slightest notion how profound the discovery was. The heels, as it turned out, were attached to the carcass of a 16-year-old woolly mammoth that perished some 30,000 years ago, almost completely intact.  The mammoth, initially nicknamed “Zhenya” after its discoverer, was said to be the most significant discovery of a mammoth since 1901, and it is the second-best preserved of its kind that has ever been uncovered. Not only was its skeleton in near-pristine condition, it also bore one of its tusks, a mass of skin, fat, meat, an eye, an ear, and many of its organs. It was this stunning find that allowed scientists to confirm the purpose of the “humps” found on the backs of these creatures, which were extra compartments of insulatory fat. By the time Zhenya made the discovery, people had been quite familiar with the extinct giants for many years, and people across the world have seen models and depictions of them to go along with the fossils.  Since Georges Cuvier recognized the specimens as an extinct elephant species near the end of the 18th century, various finds of mammoth fossils, particularly in places where they were well preserved in the cold, have made the woolly mammoth perhaps the most popular extinct animal outside of the dinosaurs.  Standing around 10 feet tall and weighing several tons, woolly mammoths seem like the stuff of legend, but ancient cave art indicated that unlike dinosaurs, woolly mammoths were contemporaries of early humans, with the last ones going extinct only about 4,000 years ago. All of that explains why people have long been fascinated by woolly mammoths and have even envisioned bringing them back to life via genetics sometime in the future. Woolly Mammoths: The History and Legacy of the Most Famous Extinct Elephant Species looks at the geological origins of the area and analyzes the fossil finds from the tar.

©2019 Charles River Editors (P)2020 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Daniel Houle
Length: 1 hr and 37 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Ancient Rome

Ancient Rome

2 ratings

Summary

With commanding skill, Thomas R. Martin tells the remarkable and dramatic story of how a tiny, poor, and threatened settlement grew to become, during its height, the dominant power in the Mediterranean world for 500 years. Encompassing the period from Rome's founding in the eighth century BC through Justinian's rule in the sixth century AD, he offers a distinctive perspective on the Romans and their civilization by employing fundamental Roman values as a lens through which to view both their rise and spectacular fall. Interweaving social, political, religious, and cultural history, Martin interprets the successes and failures of the Romans in war, political organization, quest for personal status, and in the integration of religious beliefs and practices with government. He focuses on the central role of social and moral values in determining individual conduct as well as decisions of state, from monarchy to republic to empire. Striving to reconstruct ancient history from the ground up, he includes frequent references to ancient texts and authors, encouraging readers to return to the primary sources. Comprehensive, concise, and accessible, this masterful account provides a unique window into Rome and its changing fortune.

©2018 Thomas R. Martin (P)2018 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

Narrator: John Lescault
Length: 8 hrs and 51 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Imperios y espadazos [Empires and Swords]

Imperios y espadazos [Empires and Swords]

Summary

Basado en el canal de YouTube, pero esta es otra historia.  ¿Es aburrida la Historia? Eso depende de quién te la cuente. Con este audio libro te lo pasarás de lujo oyendo y adentrándote en la fascinante Antigüedad. Los hechos más importantes de este periodo reunidos en un único volumen lleno de curiosidades y anécdotas, y relatados en orden cronológico para que no te pierdas.  Descubre a través de esta divertida obra los misterios que esconden temas como el origen de la vida en la Tierra en el remoto mundo prehistórico, la fundación de la primera gran civilización en Sumeria, la construcción de las enormes pirámides del Antiguo Egipto, el colapso del Bronce por los Pueblos del Mar, el desarrollo de la democracia griega, o la expansión de Roma por todo el Mediterráneo hasta la llegada de los temibles bárbaros germánicos.  Please note: This audiobook is in Spanish.

©2017 Andoni Garrido Fernández (P)2020 Audible, Inc.

Narrator: Carlos Garza
Length: 22 hrs and 18 mins
Available on Audible
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The History of Rome, Volume 6: Books 40 - 45

1 rating

Summary

Livy's splendid adventure of Rome's rise to dominance comes to a close in this concluding volume of his magnificent history. Sadly, the work abruptly halts near the completion of book 45, which concerns events in Greece in the year 168 BC. The missing portions, numbering 107 books, have never been found. The original text of this monumental history, which came to 142 books when he completed it, carried the story to 9 BC. Livy called his work Ab Urbe Condita, though we refer to it as The History of Rome. Almost the entire subject of volume six deals with Rome's struggle with Macedon, ending in the defeat of Perseus at the battle of Pydna. It was an epic struggle with a dangerous foe. And though it was certainly not intended by Livy to be the end of his work, this segment does provide a spectacular display of his writing talent and penchant for drama... a fitting end to an epic work. Translation: Roberts

Public Domain (P)2011 Audio Connoisseur

Author: Titus Livy
Length: 13 hrs and 10 mins
Available on Audible
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The Battle of Manzikert

Summary

The Byzantine Empire existed for over a thousand years, with a history spanning from the division of the Roman Empire in 395 until the Ottoman conquest of Constantinople in 1453. It was formed from the previous Eastern Roman Empire, and during its long existence, the Byzantine inhabitants were very proud to call themselves Romans.  However, many things changed during the long lifespan of the Byzantine Empire, starting with a Hellenization in the sixth century. The use of the Latin language diminished and Greek took its place, while the typical Roman culture gave way to a more Hellenistic one. The Hellenization of Byzantium was detrimental to the relationship with the Holy Roman Empire, and the Christian world from that point would be split in two. The subsequent strengthening of the Orthodox Church caused many civil wars and conflicts to arise during the centuries, which shattered and reshaped the territory time after time. By the end of the Byzantine Empire’s existence, the old age had weakened both the state and church, making it an easy target for invading forces.  The most notable invaders were the the Turkish-speaking Seljuks, led through a series of battles by Kutalmishouglu Suleiman, who supported different usurpers against the Byzantine emperor. The expansion of the Seljuks was so successful that when Suleiman died, he had put all of Bithynia under his control as well as several important harbor towns along the shores on the Asian side of Bosphorus. With that accomplishment, he had managed to separate the Byzantines living in Anatolia from their emperor in Constantinople. This immediately weakened the unity of the Byzantine Empire.  When another invading Muslim army took control of what is now Syria, Israel, and Northern Africa, the dismembered Byzantine Empire lost significant portions of land, but that allowed it to grow into a smaller and stronger unity. It took a lot of power struggles and battles on many fronts for the empire to recapture some of the lands, but gradually the Byzantine Empire lost all influence in Anatolia. By the end of the 11th century, the Hellenic culture and Greek language were replaced by Islam and Turkish.  Of all the conflicts that brought this state of affairs into being, perhaps none was as instrumental as the Battle of Manzikert, a fact noted by Turkey’s current leader. In the Republic of Turkey, Victory Day is an important commemoration that remembers the Battle of Dumlupinar (August 26-30, 1922), when a Greek invasion of western Anatolia was effectively halted. Mustafa Kemal Pasha, the founder of modern Turkey, rescued Anatolia (Asia Minor) from an attempt by Greece to conquer the Greek-speaking regions. This nationalistic conflict severed Turkey from its imperial Ottoman past and set it on a path as a free, independent, and secular nation.  The memory of the battle still stirs up powerful emotions in the national psyche, not only in Turkey but among Armenians, Greeks, and other ethnicities who recall hundreds of years of oppression, particularly the Turkish-initiated genocides of the early 20th century. For all these nations, the Battle of Manzikert is no simple matter of historical record: Its consequences reach down to the present day and impact their lives. For historians, the study of the battle is usually a more academic consideration. Traditionally, it has been regarded as marking the end of Christian hegemony in Asia Minor and the beginning of the rise of Islam as a rival to Christianity in the battle over the fate of Western Civilization. While contemporary historians do agree that Manzikert had momentous consequences, the extent to which it actually changed the course of history is a matter of lively debate.

©2019 Charles River Editors (P)2019 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Bill Hare
Length: 1 hr and 42 mins
Available on Audible
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The Mysteries of Mithras

Summary

In the early Roman Empire, as Christianity struggled to gain a foothold and survive in the polytheistic pool of Roman theology, its greatest rivals weren't the Caesars or the Roman aristocracy but rather the faith and devotion of the common Roman legionary. The faith of these men was centered on the god Mithras, who, they believed, led them to victory upon the field of battle and had done so for nearly four centuries. Despite this widespread belief among soldiers, the cult of Mithras was not a creation of the Romans, although they would eventually add their own rituals and mysteries to the ancient religion. In fact, the Mithraic religion was an Indo-Persian creation, a theology which managed to travel from India and back into the Hellenic and Roman world by way of Alexander the Great's conquest of the Persian Empire. Eventually, the cult of Mithras would spread across the ancient world, and Mithras would be worshiped from the mountains of India to the coasts of Spain. As a result, the cult of Mithras could ultimately be found in every corner of the Roman Empire. The Mithras cult was one of the many "mystery religions" that the Romans adopted, several of which came from cultures outside of Rome. Isis, an Egyptian goddess, and Cybele, an Anatolian goddess, were both popular with Roman women, while Mithras, which was a variation of the name of the Zoroastrian demigod Mithra, was popular with Roman soldiers and the political elite for over 400 years. Since the Mithras cult, like all of the Roman mystery cults, was esoteric in nature, the exact nature of the influence other cultures had on the cult remains unknown, but some archaeological evidence has led modern scholars to make educated deductions. Some believe that the conscription of Persian soldiers into the Roman army and continued contact between the Parthians and Romans led to some members of the ever-eclectic Roman society adopting the cult directly from the Parthian/Zoroastrian religion (Clark 2001, 157). This seems like the most plausible explanation, but others have argued that the Mithras cult was actually a Roman religion that was given a Parthian façade to make it appear more exotic in order to attract Romans who were enthralled with eastern spirituality (Clark 2001, 157). The best evidence to determine the origins of the Mithras cult can be found in the many temples throughout Europe that the Romans erected to the god. These temples, known as mithraea, were subterranean chambers where the secret rituals of the cult took place. The best evidence from extant mithraea are the reliefs on the altars, which depict a graphic mythological story. The altar reliefs usually depict the god slaughtering a bull, often accompanied by a leaping dog (Clark 2001, 158). The references to Zoroastrian theology are unmistakable; the bull slaughter is similar to an account from a Zoroastrian text (the Bundahishen), while dogs were viewed as asha animals in Zoroastrian theology and an important part of the funerary ritual (Clark 2001, 158). The detailed iconography on the Mithras altars suggests that the inventors of the Mithras cult had more than just a superficial knowledge of Zoroastrianism, which in turn indicates a provenance of the religion somewhere in Persian or Parthia.

©2016 Charles River Editors (P)2016 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Ken Teutsch
Length: 1 hr and 22 mins
Available on Audible
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Ugarit

Summary

My father, behold, the enemy's ships came (here); my cities(?) were burned, and they did evil things in my country. Does not my father know that all my troops and chariots(?) are in the Land of Hatti, and all my ships are in the Land of Lukka?...Thus, the country is abandoned to itself. May my father know it: The seven ships of the enemy that came here inflicted much damage upon us.” (King Ammurapi) Not far from the Latakia, Syria, near the Mediterranean Sea coast, is the politically insignificant town of Burj al-Qasab. Throughout most of its history, Burj al-Qasab was overshadowed by Latakia, but this was not always the case. More than 3,000 years ago, on a hill known as Ras Sharma located just outside Burj al-Qasab, a sprawling metropolis much more important and powerful than Latakia, or most other modern cities in the region for that matter once existed. Ras Sharma was the location of Ugarit, an extremely wealthy and powerful Bronze Age city-state that received and sent merchants far and wide through its gates. It also developed complex geopolitical relationships with some of the most powerful empires of the period, including the Hittites, Egyptians, Babylonians, and Mitanni. Ugarit was a truly cosmopolitan city, where dozens of languages were spoken, people from all over the Near East lived, and exotic goods were as common as the sands on its beaches. When Ugarit was at the pinnacle of its power and wealth, it was destroyed by foreign invaders and quickly forgotten. Thanks to modern archaeologists, philologists, and historians, the secrets of Ugarit were uncovered in the early 20th century when it was revealed that Ras Sharma was part of an ancient city. As scholars excavated the ancient site and documented the plethora of art and written texts found there, they realized that it was the important city of Ugarit that had been mentioned in texts and inscriptions by major Bronze Age Near Eastern kingdoms. Modern scholars learned that although Ugarit was not one of the major kingdoms or so-called Great Powers of the Late Bronze Age Near East, it was powerful and important in its own right. Ugarit was extremely important economically, as its merchants played the role of middlemen between the empires, bringing goods from major empires of the period to be traded in Ugarit’s markets. The culture of Ugarit was also important - it was similar to other Canaanite peoples of the Levant region and also influenced later peoples of the region, especially in terms of religion. Ugarit also bore witness to the transition from the Bronze to the Iron Age during the late 13th and early 12th centuries BCE, which arguably changed the structure and course of world history more fundamentally than any period before or since. During this period, numerous wealthy and enduring kingdoms of the eastern Mediterranean Sea region collapsed, and new ones rose in their places. At the center of this period of turmoil was a group of people known today as the Sea Peoples, the English translation of the name given to them by the Egyptians. Despite their prominent role in history, however, the Sea Peoples remain as mysterious as they were influential; while the Egyptians documented their presence and the wars against them, it has never been clear exactly where the Sea Peoples originated from, or what compelled them to invade various parts of the region with massive numbers. Whatever the reason, the Sea Peoples posed an existential threat to the people already living in the region, and ultimately the people of Ugarit would be among their many victims.

©2020 Charles River Editors (P)2020 Charles River Editors

Narrator:
Length: 1 hr and 31 mins
Available on Audible
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Roman Empire: The Ins and Outs of What Roman History Is All About

Summary

This guide deals with the dealings of the Romans 2,000 years ago. You'll learn more about their habits, their wars, the success of their empire, the first emperor, Augustus, Pompeii and its purpose, the eruption there, the Vestal Virgins and their tasks in society. In short, this is the perfect guide to get acquainted with how Romans lives. Start listening now.

©2019 Ron Carver (P)2020 Ron Carver

Narrator: Brandon Woodall
Author: Ron Carver
Length: 4 hrs and 6 mins
Available on Audible
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The World of Biblical Israel

2 ratings

Summary

From Genesis to Job, the Hebrew scriptures contain some of the most influential stories in Western civilization. But what do these stories tell us about daily life in ancient Israel? And why do they still speak to us today? In 24 captivating lectures, Professor Chapman introduces you to the stories of the Judeans in exile and grounds them in their historical context, giving you a grand vision of history as presented in the scriptures. She compares the history in the Bible to the archaeological record so that you come away with a complete picture of life in biblical Israel. Discover the complete literary power of the scriptures by investigating many of the Bible's key historical moments, from the origins of the Israelites in the Torah to the Babylonian Captivity and the resettlement under the Persian Empire, which is the very heart of the Hebrew scriptures. Learn how the exilic period motivated the community to reexamine its relationship to its God, its land, its religious practices, and its legacy to the children who would become the new Israel. But you'll tackle more than the sweep of history. From the family compounds to the battlefields and from the kitchens to the temples, Professor Chapman puts flesh on the bones of the biblical stories. Spiritually engaging and historically fascinating, this course is unlike any other, and it will give you a new appreciation both for ancient history and for the foundation of the three Abrahamic faiths. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2013 The Great Courses (P)2013 The Teaching Company, LLC

Length: 12 hrs and 18 mins
Available on Audible
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Thucydides: The Reinvention of History

Summary

Donald Kagan—Yale’s Sterling Professor of Classics and History—delivers a compelling new look at revisionism in Thucydides’ classic History of the Peloponnesian War. To determine how accurate and dispassionate the Athenian general really was, Kagan exposes his epic to an enlightening and thorough analysis. Using contemporary and modern sources, Kagan reveals the exiled aristocrat’s biases, prejudices, and his clear intention to spin events in his own way.

©2009 Donald Kagan (P)2010 Recorded Books, LLC

Narrator: Paul Hecht
Author: Donald Kagan
Length: 9 hrs and 35 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Roman Myths: You Must Know Before You Die!

Roman Myths: You Must Know Before You Die!

Summary

About the series The "You Must Know Before You Die!" series is a fascinating and immersive educational collection of publications that delve deep into numerous and far-reaching subjects across the educational spectrum; ranging from Greek mythology and evolution to history and the constructs of our Universe. You have much to learn before the Grim Reaper comes-a-calling so listen on and fill your mind with mountains of insightful knowledge. Knowledge you can use for a brighter tomorrow. About the audiobook This is a collection of fascinating facts, insights and stories into Roman Mythology. Numerous gods and tales of Roman Mythology have their origins in Greek Mythology; with slight adaptations in names, places and the nitty gritty parts, for example Heracles in Roman Mythology is referred to as Hercules in Greek, so be sure to check out my other books too. VIP Mythologists Club Join today: storyoriginapp.com Socials Instagram: www.instagram.com/david_fuentes_author/ Facebook: m.facebook.com/DavidFuentesAuthor Thank you! Please let me know your thoughts on this audiobook; I would love to know what you enjoy most and where you would love our stories to go next. Be sure to check out my other books too, just search David Fuentes, for more fascinating tales that you are bound to enjoy time and time again. Thank you for your support and feel free to contact myself via social media should you wish to know more. Other great works by David Fuentes Follow the Money: A Tale of Tales Follow the Money: A Tale of Tales is a collection of immersive crime adventure novellas that follow the lives of different banknotes on their journeys, as they pass from one doomed soul to the next, through London and New York respectively. Both of these banknotes undergo...A twist of fate in the second instalment of each story that sends them on a completely new journey into the unknown; so fasten your seat belts and brace yourself for the ride of your lives. Your journey awaits... Reverb: Live, Die, Rave, Repeat Reverb: Live, Die, Rave, Repeat tells the epic story of six young and adventurous students who get to relive the first day of their, no holds barred, holiday to the hedonistic party haven of Magaluf over and over and over again. This book is full of twists and turns that will always keep you guessing as to what could possibly befall our Ill-fated adventurers next as they not only find out more about the world around them, as they venture hundreds and hundreds of miles away from the school-yard, but also truly discover more about themselves through their journey of a thousand lifetimes. Expect sun, sex, and sangria all mixed in with EDM, even more sex and narcotics. You won’t want to miss out on this whirlwind of an adventure that will leave you craving for more and more, and more...

©2020 David Fuentes (P)2020 David Fuentes

Narrator: Jason Hunt
Length: 1 hr and 5 mins
Available on Audible
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Greece

Summary

From our democratic way of government to timeless elements of architectural design, the civilization of the ancient Greeks has influenced virtually every civilization on earth, past and present. The influence of the Greek culture, whether it be in philosophy or the tradition of the Olympic games, is buried so deeply in modern life that we're often unaware of it. This full cast audio production takes the listener back to the origins of Ancient Greece in its Golden Age to revisit elements of daily life and milestones of achievement. In this informative and entertaining journey, the listener will discover how that ancient culture reaches through time to touch our modern world.

©1994 Time Life Books, All Rights Reserved, (P)1998 Time Warner Audiobooks (Packaging Elements Only); 16 9

Author: uncredited
Length: 1 hr and 41 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Naples: The History and Legacy of the Prominent Italian City-State from Antiquity to Today

Naples: The History and Legacy of the Prominent Italian City-State from Antiquity to Today

Summary

The history of Naples is long and tortured, or at least for centuries that was how its history has been told. Inhabited almost continuously from the Neolithic era to the present, Naples was founded by the Greeks and conquered by the Romans. After the fall of the Roman Empire, Naples passed between various foreign rulers for its entire history prior to Italian unification. Starting in 1040, when the Norman French invaders conquered Campania, Naples was ruled in a dizzying succession by Germans, then French, then Spanish, then Austrians, then Spanish, then French, and then Spanish.  Although it is in many ways a microcosm of European history with a revolving door of conquerors, historians like to stress the unique status of Naples thanks to these diverse influences and unique geography. Set on a bay that provided a natural harbor, Naples is home to Mount Vesuvius, the only active volcano on the European mainland. When Vesuvius erupts, the Neapolitans pay the price, and it has earned its reputation as the most dangerous volcano in the world. However, the threat posed by Vesuvius is tempered by a great benefit: Naples is blessed with extremely fertile soil. The natural harbor of Naples and its position on the southwest coast of Italy helps explain its history of multiple rulers, insofar as it made Naples a central locus of trade between Italy, Greece, Byzantium, North Africa, Spain, Holland, Flanders, and Germany. Due to its strategic importance, Naples reached high levels of prosperity, and for the same reason, it also suffered as various foreign powers vied for control of the city and the surrounding area.  All the while, the sheer beauty of the bay of Naples, with Vesuvius looming in the distance, has made Naples a place of endless fascination. It boasts imposing castles and fortresses, as well as twisty, turning medieval streets that are home to some of Italy’s poorest and most maligned residents. Across the bay are the islands of Capri and Ischia, which only add to the allure of the city. Furthermore, its cuisine - particularly its pizza (which was invented in Naples) and its richly sweet desserts - rates amongst the most appreciated in all of Italy, no doubt thanks to the fertility of the soil that favors agricultural production.  Nonetheless, Naples does not enjoy an excellent reputation, within the context of Italy or of Europe. High rates of petty crime, a decaying urban fabric and the infamous presence of the mafia (known in Naples as the Camorra) all combine to ensure fewer tourists venture to explore Naples, and many Italians (civilians and politicians alike) consider it the ultimate “problem city.”  Naples: The History and Legacy of the Prominent Italian City-State from Antiquity to Today dives into the city's origin story, how it became one of the most important places in Europe, and its winding history. You will learn about Naples like never before.

©2019 Charles River Editors (P)2019 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Colin Fluxman
Length: 1 hr and 18 mins
Available on Audible
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Brian Boru Timeline

Summary

This is a short timeline of Brian Boru.

©2020 Hourly History (P)2020 Hourly History

Length: 4 mins
Available on Audible
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The Age of Reptiles

Summary

The early history of our planet covers such vast stretches of time that years, centuries, and even millennia become virtually meaningless. Instead paleontologists and scientists who study geochronology divide time into periods and eras. The current view of science is that planet Earth is around 4.6 billion years old. The first four billion years of its development are known as the Precambrian period. For the first billion years or so, there was no life in Earth. Then the first single-celled life-forms, early bacteria and algae, began to emerge. We don’t know where they came from or even if they originated on this planet at all. This gradual development continued until around four billion years ago when suddenly (in geological terms!) more complex forms of life began to emerge. Scientists call this time of an explosion of new forms of life the Paleozoic Era and it stretched from around 541 to 250 million years ago (Mya). First of all, in the oceans and then on land, new creatures and plants began to appear in bewildering variety. By the end of this period, life on Earth had exploded into a myriad of complex forms that filled virtually every habitat and niche available in the seas and on the planet’s only continent, Pangea. Then a mysterious event that became known to early paleontologists as “The Great Dying” wiped out more than 95 percent of all life on Earth. No-one is entirely certain what caused this, but the effect of this cataclysm was as if someone had pressed a great, cosmic “reset” button and it took 30 million years for the development of life on Earth to start again.

©2020 Charles River Editors (P)2020 Charles River Editors

Length: 3 hrs and 24 mins
Available on Audible
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Breve historia de Roma

Summary

Una síntesis magistral de la totalidad de la vida romana, desde su fundación hasta su ocaso a manos de los bárbaros. En esta obra, Miguel Ángel Novillo López, emprende la necesaria labor de resumir los quince siglos de la existencia de la cultura romana con fin de crear una obra altamente didáctica, amena y rigurosa. Una ventana limpia a la civilización que sentó las bases de nuestro modo de vida actual. El autor traza un amplio recorrido cronológico para explicar las bases para la fundación de Roma y el posterior devenir de este pueblo desde la monarquía a la república y, por último, al imperio que será consumido por la corrupción y la decadencia. Pero lo verdaderamente fundamental de la obra no es, pese a ser de gran relevancia, el amplio arco cronológico que recorre, su punto fuerte es que ofrece una mirada alternativa y sobradamente detallada de la historia romana. No se centra en el devenir político y militar de la Ciudad Eterna, sino que se sumerge en cuestiones que son también fundamentales para comprender su historia como: la evolución de la esclavitud, los conflictos entre patricios y plebeyos, las magistraturas y las asambleas, la religión, la numismática o la literatura romana. Una obra esencial y necesaria para la comprensión de esta porción fundamental de la historia universal. Grabada para ser disfrutada tanto por los investigadores especializados, como por los legos, ya que no demanda un vasto conocimiento previo. Breve Historia de Roma nos sumerge, a lo largo del tiempo y del espacio, en la vida cotidiana de la Ciudad Eterna.

©2012 Ediciones Nowtilus S.L. (P)2021 Audible Studios

Narrator: Josema Soler
Length: 9 hrs and 13 mins
Available on Audible
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The Amber Road

1 rating

Summary

“Pytheas says that the Gutones, a people of Germany, inhabit the shores of an estuary of the Ocean called Mentonomon, their territory extending a distance of six thousand stadia; that, at one day's sail from this territory, is the Isle of Abalus, upon the shores of which, amber is thrown up by the waves in spring, it being an excretion of the sea in a concrete form; as, also, that the inhabitants use this amber by way of fuel, and sell it to their neighbors, the Teutones...” (Pliny the Elder)

The story of the Silk Road has been a popular topic among tourists, academics, economists, state parties, and daydreaming children for many centuries. In many ways the Silk Road can be seen everywhere, and it has existed for as long as people have traveled across Eurasia. Its impact is widely felt among the diverse peoples that live on the continent, through the unique regional art and architectural styles, as well as in countless films, books, academic studies, and organized tours devoted to the ancient trade routes.

At the same time, however, the Silk Road is an entirely abstract invention, first coined by the 19th century German geographer Ferdinand von Richthofen. There has never existed a single route - let alone a road - that was used to transfer goods, nor was silk the primary commodity traded across Eurasia. Instead, the Silk Road is more a multi-layered narrative about the rise and fall of nomadic confederations and sedentary societies, the consolidation and dissolution of kingdoms and empires, the exchange of commodities and fine crafts, and the transfer and mixture of ideas, religions, technology, science, art, architecture, myths, and legends. It is a story that is relevant for the present-day countries through which this exchange once took place, as they lay claim to the artifacts, heritage sites, and symbolic meaning of the Silk Road for political and economic purposes and to build their national identity.

In fact, international trade in the ancient world was a more intricate and far-reaching system than many have been led to believe. The Silk Road and the Incense Trade Route have been heavily investigated in recent decades, but the Amber Road trade network dominating northern Europe has been given far less attention. Amber, the hardened sap of prehistoric trees, has washed up on Baltic shores for generations, and though it had little value to the locals beyond religious symbolism and aesthetic beauty, they learned that foreign civilizations would pay massive sums for the beautiful substance.

Though written sources are scattered and tend to come and go depending on the civilization involved, much has been written by ancient authors, particularly of Greek and Roman origins. More importantly, archeologists have traced the spread of amber through the discovery of pieces with specific chemical construction, linking it back to the Baltic region. Once thought to have mainly been exported to Rome, Baltic amber has also been found in Mycenaean Greece, Egypt and Syria, though perhaps not surprisingly, it was Roman demand that formed the height of the amber exchange.

Perhaps even more interesting than the movement of the amber is regarding shifting trade operations from government controlled systems to private merchant enterprises to monopolies of guilds and orders, a return to government control, and finally, the selling of the trade to individual countries. It is a fascinating microcosm of changing political and governmental landscapes through millennia of change and development in northern Europe and the wider ancient Mediterranean world.

The Amber Road: The History and Legacy of the Ancient Trade Network that Moved Amber across Europe looks at the development of this crucial trade, and its impact on antiquity.

©2019 Charles River Editors (P)2019 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Bill Hare
Length: 1 hr and 17 mins
Available on Audible
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Annals

Summary

Beginning at the end of Augustus' reign, Tacitus's Annals examines the rules of the Roman emperors from Tiberius to Nero (though Caligula's books are lost to us). Their dramas and scandals are brought fully under the spotlight, as Tacitus presents a catalog of their murders, atrocities, sexual improprieties, and other vices in no unsparing terms. Debauched, cruel, and paranoid, they are portrayed as being on the verge of madness. Their wars and battles, such as the war with the Parthians, are also described with the same scrutinizing intensity.  Tacitus' last major historical work, the Annals is an extraordinary glimpse into the pleasures and perils of a Roman leader, and is considered by many to be a masterpiece. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.

Public Domain (P)2020 Naxos AudioBooks

Narrator: David Timson
Author: Tacitus
Length: 18 hrs and 11 mins
Available on Audible
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Ancient Greece

Summary

Explore the captivating history of ancient Greece   The culture and events of Greece were so influential they have a significant effect on modern-day people all over the world. The ancient Greeks gave birth to democracy, a political system frequently used and considered by some as the best form of government. Great minds from Greece also made incredible and vital discoveries such as the water mill, the basics of geometry and using medicine to cure illness. The ancient Greek philosophers laid the groundwork for a whole new field of thought and study. Ancient Greece offered the foundation of the Olympic games, which still run regularly today. Particularly famous historical figures such as Alexander the Great and Cleopatra also had ties to and roles during Greek history, through the course of wars and empire expansion. Given the influence of Ancient Greece, as you learn about this time and place, you will learn about your history and the origins of the people, places, and institutions you likely regularly studied in school. Starting in the Dark Ages, this audiobook will take you on a captivating journey through the darkness, democracy, discovery, and development of Western Civilization. Some of the topics covered in this audiobook include: Dawn of the Dark Ages From darkness to democracy Olympic origins Greece grows from war to war The fight for democracy The Peloponnesian War Enter Alexander the Great Great minds of Ancient Greece Roman take-over Cleopatra and her consorts Hadrian’s travels Gothic raids on Greece Rise of Christianity End of antiquity And much more! Get the audiobook now and learn more about ancient Greece.

©2018 Captivating History (P)2018 Captivating History

Narrator: Duke Holm
Length: 1 hr and 59 mins
Available on Audible
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Breve historia de los persas

Summary

La presentación completa de los persas, un pueblo casi desconocido que, no obstante, igualó y superó, en algunos aspectos, a Grecia y a Roma. La influencia de los persas en la historia es enorme, no sólo en la historia de Asia o del Oriente Próximo, sino en la historia universal ya que es una de las fuentes indiscutibles de la civilización. Es curioso, por ello, la escasez de estudios sobre la totalidad de la historia de este pueblo. Si bien podemos encontrar algunas monografías sobre los aqueménidas, no encontramos ninguna que repase completamente la historia del actual Irán, incluyendo todos sus pueblos: elamitas, medos y persas, aqueménidas, seleúcidas, partos y sasánidas.  Dando cuenta así de la importancia del Imperio persa y ayudando a comprender que los persas, en realidad, fueron la contrapartida oriental de la cultura grecorromana para el occidente. Jorge Pisa traza un arco temporal que engloba completamente la historia de los pueblos que se situaron en el Oriente Medio y crearon un imperio que llegó a ocupar desde Anatolia hasta la India en su época de máximo esplendor. Comienza con los orígenes de una civilización, Elam, en el 3.000 a. C. y nos irá narrando las sucesivas transformaciones políticas de los pueblos hegemónicos: los medas que comenzaron la creación del Imperio persa; los aqueménidas que suponen el esplendor de los persas, con reyes tan importantes como Ciro II el Grande, Darío I, o Jerjes I; los partos que se enfrascarán en pugnas sucesorias tras la muerte de Alejandro Magno; o los sasánidas que recuperarán el poder para los persas y finalmente serán aniquilados por los ejércitos del islam.  Un recorrido fascinante en el que aparecerán personalidades tan relevantes como Ciro, Jerjes, Darío I, Alejandro Magno… y nos llevará a ciudades tan suntuosas como Susa, Ecbatana y Persépolis. Un libro imprescindible para comprender la importancia de Persia en la civilización mundial.  Please note: This audiobook is in Spanish.

©2011 Ediciones Nowtilus S.L. (P)2014 Audible Inc.

Narrator: Sergio Lonardi
Length: 8 hrs and 5 mins
Available on Audible
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Homo Erectus: The History of the Archaic Humans Who Left Africa and Formed the First Hunter-Gatherer Societies

1 rating

Summary

Most scientists believe the evolution of humans has a history as long as life itself. Anatomically modern humans and all other life that has existed on the planet first came about from the single-celled microorganisms that emerged approximately 4 billion years ago. Through the processes of mutation and natural selection, all forms of life developed, and this continuous lineage of life makes it difficult to say precisely when one species completely separates from another. In other words, scientists still debate when a human became a human rather than the ancestor species that came before. Around 1.8 million years ago, a third species of Homo appeared in the fossil record. H. erectus would have shared the landscape for a time with H. habilis and H. rudolfensis, but the fossils of H. erectus are not limited to eastern and southern Africa. Instead, they are found across Africa and parts of mainland and insular Asia. This is the first species of Homo to be found outside Africa (Rightmire 1993). Features of H. erectus suggest an evolution toward modern humans, and the features that separate H. erectus from the other Homo species are found in the skull. The size of the brain was approximately 900 cc, making it larger than the brain size of H. habilis. H. erectus would not have the largest brain capacity of the Homo genus during its existence, with the emergence of H. heidelbergensis approximately 800,000 years ago. The larger brain size may not matter much when the size of the brain is considered with the size of the body, which also increased.  While the facial features of H. erectus would have made them noticeably different if they were alive today, their postcranial morphology may have been similar to modern humans. A key difference is the density or thickness of the bones; in H. erectus the limb bones are more robust, but otherwise they appear very similar to modern humans. The length of the hindlimbs in relation to the arms is similar to modern humans, which means that H. erectus may have been able to walk in a similar way. (Richtmire 1993: 57–84). This may or may not be linked with the widespread distribution of H. erectus.  Perhaps more important for H. erectus than simply being able to walk out of Africa would have been the ability to adapt to changing climates and essentially modify the environment around them. Most notably, the major advantage that H. erectus would have had is the ability to control fire. This skill, which no other animal has mastered, helped H. erectus travel across the world, and it may date as far back as 1.7 million years ago to as recently as 200,000 years ago. Most scientists agree that H. erectus was able to control fire by at least 600,000 years ago. Homo Erectus: The History of the Archaic Humans Who Left Africa and Formed the First Hunter-Gatherer Societies examines how H. erectus evolved, and what their lives were like. 

©2018 Charles River Editors (P)2018 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Colin Fluxman
Length: 1 hr and 49 mins
Available on Audible
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The Restoration of Rome

Summary

The 50 years following the assassination of Severus Alexander on March 19, 235 CE has been generally regarded by academics as one of the lowest points in the history of the Roman Empire. In stark contrast to the previous 150 years, which included the reigns of the Five Good Emperors and has been universally praised as one of the high points of the empire. This period of time also saw the empire beset by threatening forces on all sides. The Romans faced a newly resurgent Persia in the east, as well as significant forces from German tribes on the Rhine and Goths along the Danube. Despite the disasters, there was at least some good news for the Romans. Aurelian and Probus both managed to recover lost territory, and they recovered some of Rome’s prestige in doing so. The final turning point came with the accession of Diocletian in 284 CE. From that point on, the empire embarked upon a period of restoration, but before reaching that stage, the empire had no fewer than 20 emperors in those 50 years, even with the exclusion of an additional five Gallic "emperors" who set themselves up as independent rulers between 260 and 274 CE. Diocletian's reign would see reforms put into place to achieve the desired end of the Imperial Crisis, and several of the emperors before him may well have had the ability to manage the reform process, but the army’s power and willingness to use and abuse power ensured that few of them truly had a chance to really make their marks. It was the worst period in the history of the Roman Empire to that point, even as it forced the Romans to deal with belligerent foreign powers and problems created by the emergence of increasingly powerful and populous provinces.  Many historians have debated how the Roman Empire managed to survive in any form at all, let alone remain robust enough to allow Diocletian and his successors to restore it. Given the many people involved, and the relatively short era in which everything transpired, Rome’s Imperial Crisis has been difficult for historians to summarize, which is why, despite being one of the most intriguing periods in Roman history, it is often overlooked by people who have chosen to focus on the more cohesive periods before and after it. It would be hard if not outright impossible to overstate the impact Roman Emperor Constantine I had on the history of Christianity, Ancient Rome, and Europe as a whole. Best known as Constantine the Great, the kind of moniker only earned by rulers who have distinguished themselves in battle and conquest, Constantine remains an influential and controversial figure to this day. He achieved enduring fame by being the first Roman emperor to personally convert to Christianity, and for his notorious Edict of Milan, the imperial decree which legalized the worship of Christ and promoted religious freedom throughout the empire.

©2019 Charles River Editors (P)2019 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Jim Johnston
Length: 2 hrs and 24 mins
Available on Audible
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Historia de las civilizaciones [The History of Civilization]

1 rating

Summary

El nacimiento de civilizaciones e imperios tan importantes como el Persa, el Romano o de la ciudad de Grecia; así como de conflictos bélicos que marcaron la historia de la humanidad como la segunda guerra mundial y la postguerra, son contados por la historiadora que revolucionó la forma de narrar los hechos del pasado. De la mano de Diana Uribe, usted podrá conocer todos los detalles, lugares y situaciones más significativas en el desarrollo del hombre. Con un enfoque muy particular, este audiolibro es un artículo infaltable en la "biblioteca" de cualquiera que esté interesado en conocer un poco más de la Historia Universal. En este audio libro Diana Uribe lo llevará por: El mundo de la Antigüedad y el origen de las civilizaciones. Los desarrollos de Persia, Grecia, Roma y otros pueblos europeos. El Renacimiento y el encuentro de dos mundos. Las revoluciones de los siglos XIX y XX. La Segunda Guerra Mundial y la posguerra. Las grandes transformaciones de los siglos XX y XXI. Please note: This audiobook is in Spanish.

©2008 Diana Uribe (P)2015 Penguin Random House Grupo Editorial, S. A. U.

Narrator: Diana Uribe
Author: Diana Uribe
Length: 7 hrs and 35 mins
Available on Audible
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Carthage

Summary

If you want to discover the captivating history of the Carthage, then pay attention... Very few of the ancient empires and nations were able to challenge the Romans, who were famous for their military might. Even fewer were able to make them shiver just by mentioning their name. In fact, only one enemy of Rome managed to engrave such fear into their bones. That was Carthage, sometimes called the Carthaginian Empire. It was a formidable state that stretched across northern Africa, from Algeria and Tunisia to the shores of Morocco and southern Spain. In its heyday, it was a formidable force that controlled much of the western Mediterranean. As such, it was the first real obstacle to the rise of the Roman state, the only one which almost brought it down before it even became an ancient superpower. Hannibal Barca, the most famous Carthaginian leader, was at one point in front of the gates of Rome. Because of that, the Carthaginian Empire, usually personified by Hannibal himself, is typically seen and described as the great foe of Rome, one of the rare daunting opponents the Romans faced. In Carthage: A Captivating Guide to the Carthaginian Empire and Its Conflicts with the Ancient Greek City-States and the Roman Republic in the Sicilian Wars and Punic Wars, you will discover chapters, such as: A New City in the West Becoming a Mediterranean Power Fighting for Control over Sicily From Allies to Enemies Succumbing to the Wounds The Carthaginian Society and Government Army of the Carthaginian Republic The Punic Civilization And much, much more! So, if you want to learn more about the Carthage, scroll up and click the "buy now" button!

©2020 Captivating History (P)2020 Captivating History

Length: 3 hrs and 25 mins
Available on Audible
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The Battle of Issus

Summary

At one point in antiquity, the Achaemenid Persian Empire was the largest empire the world had ever seen, but aside from its role in the Greco-Persian Wars and its collapse at the hands of Alexander the Great, it has been mostly overlooked. When it has been studied, the historical sources have mostly been Greek, the very people the Persians sought to conquer.  Needless to say, their versions were biased, and attitudes about the Persians were only exacerbated by Alexander the Great and his biographers, who maintained a fiery hatred toward Xerxes I of Persia due to his burning of Athens. The Macedonians targeted many of his building projects after their capture of Persepolis, and they pushed an even bleaker picture of the king - one of an idle, indolent, cowardly, and corrupt ruler.  It was not until excavations in the region during the 20th century that many of the relics, reliefs, and clay tablets that offer so much information about Persian life came to be studied for the first time. Through archaeological remains, ancient texts, and work by a new generation of historians, a picture can today be built of this remarkable civilization and their most famous leaders. Of course, far more is known about Alexander the Great and his military accomplishments, the most important of which was bringing about the demise of the Persian Empire. Over the last 2,000 years, ambitious men have dreamed of forging vast empires and attaining eternal glory in battle, but of all the conquerors who took steps toward such dreams, none were ever as successful as antiquity’s first great conqueror.  Leaders of the 20th century hoped to rival Napoleon’s accomplishments, while Napoleon aimed to emulate the accomplishments of Julius Caesar. But Caesar himself found inspiration in Alexander the Great (356-323 BCE), the Macedonian king who managed to stretch an empire from Greece to the Himalayas in Asia by the age of 30. It took less than 15 years for Alexander to conquer much of the known world. Ever since the famous Persian invasions that had been repelled by the Athenians at Marathon and then by the Spartans at Thermopylae and Plataea, Greece and Persia had been at odds. For the past few years, they had enjoyed an uneasy peace, but that peace was shattered when, in 334 BCE, Alexander crossed the Hellespont into Persia. He brought with him an army of 50,000 infantry, 6,000 cavalry, and a navy of over 100 ships, a mixed force of Macedonians, Greeks, Thracians, and Illyrians, all chosen for their specific strengths (the Thessalians, for example, were famous cavalrymen). He was still just 22.  Darius III, king of Persia at the time of Alexander’s invasion, was no tactical genius, but he was an intelligent and persistent enemy who had been handed the throne just before the arrival of the indomitable Alexander. His misfortune was to face an enemy at the forefront of military innovation and flexibility - a fighting force that he was not equipped to handle and the unconquerable will of the Macedonian army, fueled by devotion to their daring and charismatic king. He would personally face Alexander twice, once at the Battle of Issus and again at the Battle of Gaugamela, and the battles would decide the fate of his empire and the fate of the Western world. The Battle of Issus: The History of Alexander the Great’s Most Famous Victory Against the Achaemenid Persian Empire looks at one of antiquity’s most important battles, and the profound ramifications of Alexander’s campaign.

©2020 Charles River Editors (P)2020 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Daniel Houle
Length: 2 hrs and 24 mins
Available on Audible
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Cyrus the Great: A Life from Beginning to End

1 rating

Summary

Cyrus II of Persia was one of the greatest leaders that the world had ever known, he was the one in whose footsteps other empire builders would follow. From Alexander the Great to countless Roman emperors and Ottoman sultans - it was the mighty shoes of Cyrus that they all attempted to fill.   Inside you will read about: Early life and legend The Persian Empire is born Love and marriage Cyrus’ last stand Aftermath and succession   And much more!   More than merely a successful conqueror, Cyrus the Great is known just as much for being a great liberator as he is known for his conquests. He was even credited in the Bible as the one who freed the Jews from their long-held Babylonian exile. By the time of his death, Cyrus controlled more land and people than anyone before him. Under his dominion were countless principalities, nationalities, ethnicities, and religions of all kinds. In contrast to many other powerful rulers, Cyrus did not seek to oppress his subjects or interfere with their way of life, religions, or local customs. It is for this reason that, as great as his temporal conquests may have been, the benevolence of Cyrus the Great’s leadership stands as his greatest attribute of all. The life of Cyrus the Great remains as an unparalleled testament in the annals of history.

©2019 Hourly History (P)2019 Hourly History

Length: 54 mins
Available on Audible
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The Battle of Gaugamela

Summary

“Then the Scythian cavalry rode along the line, and came into conflict with the front men of Alexander's array, but he nevertheless still continued to march towards the right, and almost entirely got beyond the ground which had been cleared and levelled by the Persians. Then Darius, fearing that his chariots would become useless, if the Macedonians advanced into the uneven ground, ordered the front ranks of his left wing to ride round the right wing of the Macedonians, where Alexander was commanding, to prevent him from marching his wing any further. This being done, Alexander ordered the cavalry of the Grecian mercenaries under the command of Menidas to attack them. But the Scythian cavalry and the Bactrians, who had been drawn up with them, sallied forth against them and being much more numerous they put the small body of Greeks to rout." (Arrian) At one point in antiquity, the Achaemenid Persian Empire was the largest empire the world had ever seen, but aside from its role in the Greco-Persian Wars and its collapse at the hands of Alexander the Great, it has been mostly overlooked. When it has been studied, the historical sources have mostly been Greek, the very people the Persians sought to conquer. Needless to say, their versions were biased, and attitudes about the Persians were only exacerbated by Alexander the Great and his biographers, who maintained a fiery hatred toward Xerxes I of Persia due to his burning of Athens. The Macedonians targeted many of his building projects after their capture of Persepolis, and they pushed an even bleaker picture of the king, one of an idle, indolent, cowardly, and corrupt ruler. It was not until excavations in the region during the 20th century that many of the relics, reliefs, and clay tablets that offer so much information about Persian life could be studied for the first time. Through archaeological remains, ancient texts, and work by a new generation of historians, a picture can today be built of this remarkable civilization and their most famous leaders. Of course, far more is known about Alexander the Great and his military accomplishments, the most important of which was bringing about the demise of the Persian Empire. Over the last 2,000 years, ambitious men have dreamed of forging vast empires and attaining eternal glory in battle, but of all the conquerors who took steps toward such dreams, none were ever as successful as antiquity’s first great conqueror. Leaders of the 20th century hoped to rival Napoleon’s accomplishments, while Napoleon aimed to emulate the accomplishments of Julius Caesar. But Caesar himself found inspiration in Alexander the Great (356-323 BCE), the Macedonian king who managed to stretch an empire from Greece to the Himalayas in Asia by the age of 30. It took less than 15 years for Alexander to conquer much of the known world. Darius III, king of Persia at the time of Alexander’s invasion, was no tactical genius, but he was an intelligent and persistent enemy who had been handed the throne just before the arrival of the indomitable Alexander. His misfortune was to face an enemy at the forefront of military innovation and flexibility, a fighting force that he was not equipped to handle, and the unconquerable will of the Macedonian army, fueled by devotion to their daring and charismatic king. He would personally face Alexander twice, once at the Battle of Issus and again at the Battle of Gaugamela, with the latter conflict deciding the fate of the Western world. The Battle of Gaugamela: The History of Alexander the Great’s Decisive Victory and the Destruction of the Achaemenid Persian Empire looks at one of antiquity’s most important conflicts, and the profound ramifications of Alexander’s campaign; you will learn about the battle like never before.

©2019 Charles River Editors (P)2019 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Daniel Houle
Length: 2 hrs and 4 mins
Available on Audible
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Caligola

Summary

La figura di Caligola è estremamente complessa: passato alla storia come imperatore folle, Caligola è divenuto esempio di tiranno che non conosce limite ai suoi più turpi desideri. Ma la vita dell'imperatore cela luci e ombre: l'infanzia travagliata, la persecuzione di Tiberio e poi l'adozione da parte di quest'ultimo, l'inaspettata ascesa al potere, l'amore dei cittadini nei suoi confronti. Poi la malattia, la follia e, infine, la morte violenta, lo hanno consacrato come uno dei peggiori tiranni che la storia abbia mai conosciuto. Questo audiobook ripercorre la sua vita, ed è arricchito da testimonianze dello scrittore Svetonio.

©2016 GOODmood (P)2016 GOODmood

Length: 51 mins
Available on Audible
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The Warrior King Charlemagne

Summary

In the middle of the eighth century, Europe was in a state of upheaval. The Islamic armies were still waging wars from Spain while Vikings began raiding from the north. Heathen tribes in the west still fought constant skirmishes with one another over land and power, while the Catholic Church remained the only hope of stability in the realm. The French kingdoms were recently united, and with their unification, one of the greatest rulers of all time took the throne. The great barbarian king Charlemagne lived a prosperous life, conquering his enemies and setting Europe onto the path of reform. Over the course of his 72-year life, Charlemagne waged wars with his enemies and conquered their territory. He subjugated the conquered people, bringing them under the rule of the Franks while giving them the access to the things they haven't had since the fall of the Roman Empire. Though his motivation was to spread Catholicism to those who did not worship his God, Charlemagne's reforms made it possible for them to remain in his kingdom and live a prosperous life. Through the alterations in education, currency, art, music, and leadership, Charlemagne brought stability back to Europe, setting it on the path to thrive for years to come.

©2016 Michael Klein (P)2016 Michael Klein

Narrator: Kenneth Maxon
Length: 3 hrs and 42 mins
Available on Audible
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Dialogues of Plato

1 rating

Summary

The Dialogues of Plato (427-347 B.C.) rank with the writings of Aristotle as the most important and influential philosophical works in Western thought. In them Plato cast his teacher Socrates as the central disputant in colloquies that brilliantly probe a vast spectrum of philosophical ideas and issues. None are more exciting and revelatory than the four dialogues - Euthyphro, Apology, Crito and Phaedo - on themes evoked by the trial and death of Socrates, accused by his enemies and detractors of crimes against the state, among them impiety and corruption of the young. In Euthyphro, Socrates explores the concepts and aims of piety and religion; in Apology, he courageously defends the integrity of his teachings; in Crito, he demonstrates his respect for the law in his refusal to flee his death sentence; and in Phaedo embraces death and discusses the immortality of the soul.

(P)1995 by Blackstone Audiobooks

Narrator: Pat Bottino
Author: Plato
Length: 5 hrs and 51 mins
Available on Audible
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Ancient History, Bundle 1: History of Empires, Ancient History

Summary

A captivating study of the beginnings of art, engineering, architecture, and more. An overview of some of the most powerful empires throughout history that helped make humankind the versatile and complicated species we are today.   History of Empires: Rise and Fall of the Greatest "Empires" in History! Understanding The: Roman Empire, American Empire, British Empire, & Much More.  A thrilling study of empires whose leaders lost sight of their civic obligations, leading to revolts, social disruption, and inescapable destruction. Journey through war, famine, conquest, and death.   Ancient History: History of the Ancient World: Ancient Civilizations, and Ancient Empires. History that Defined our World (3rd edition with added content) Discover how ancient civilizations molded us into what we are today. A tantalizing glimpse into our vast and complex ancient history that is sure to inspire further study. There is a lot to be learned from ancient history.

©2017 Lean Stone Publishing (P)2018 Lean Stone Publishing

Author: Robert Dean
Length: 3 hrs and 4 mins
Available on Audible
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Blood in the Arena

Summary

From the center of imperial Rome to the farthest reaches of ancient Britain, Gaul, and Spain, amphitheaters marked the landscape of the Western Roman Empire. Built to bring Roman institutions and the spectacle of Roman power to conquered people, many still remain as witnesses to the extent and control of the empire. In this audiobook, Alison Futrell explores the arena as a key social and political institution for binding Rome and its provinces. She begins with the origins of the gladiatorial contest and shows how it came to play an important role in restructuring Roman authority in the later republic. She then traces the spread of amphitheaters across the Western empire as a means of transmitting and maintaining Roman culture and control in the provinces. Futrell also examines the larger implications of the arena as a venue for the ritualized mass slaughter of human beings, showing how the gladiatorial contest took on both religious and political overtones. This wide-ranging study, which draws insights from archaeology and anthropology, as well as classics, broadens our understanding of the gladiatorial contest and its place within the highly politicized cult practice of the Roman Empire. The book is published by University of Texas Press. The audiobook is published by University Press Audiobooks. Praise for the book: “Brings fresh perspectives to the study of the Roman amphitheater…important insights into the psychological dimensions of these public spectacles for the Roman viewer.” (Classical World)

©1997 University of Texas Press (P)2020 Redwood Audiobooks

Narrator: Devon Y. Enyedy
Length: 10 hrs and 31 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Arrian Box Set: The Campaigns of Alexander & Eumenides

Arrian Box Set: The Campaigns of Alexander & Eumenides

Summary

Arrian of Nicomedia (c. 86/89-c. after 146/160 AD), was a Greek historian, public servant, military commander, and philosopher of the Roman period. Although written more than 400 years after Alexander's death, Arrian's Campaigns of Alexander is the most reliable account of Alexander from antiquity. Arrian's personal experience as a commander gave him unique insights into the life of the world's greatest conqueror. He discusses Alexander's suppression of the Theban rebellion, his defeat of Persia, and his campaigns through Egypt, the Levant, and Mesopotamia. After 12 years of campaigning, Alexander the Great controlled an empire stretching from the Balkans and the Adriatic Sea in the west to modern-day Pakistan to the east. Arrian combines his personal experience of battle with material from Ptolemy’s memoirs and other ancient sources to present a singular portrait of Alexander.

Public Domain (P)2020 Museum Audiobooks

Author: Arrian
Length: 13 hrs and 26 mins
Available on Audible
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Giulio Cesare

Summary

Giulio Cesare è uno de personaggi più affascinanti della storia romana. La sua ambizione lo portò, sin da giovane, ad essere sempre partecipe della scena politica; ogni mossa e ogni singola scelta, furono compiute da Cesare con estrema cautela e lungimiranza. Impiegò ogni sforzo per raggiungere il potere, non esitando davanti a nulla. Fu in grado di compiere atti di grande coraggio, ma anche di estrema crudeltà quando le circostanze lo richiedevano. Divenne dittatore di Roma e, se la congiura mise fine alla sua vita e al suo desiderio di potere, la sua politica aveva ormai dato avvio a quel processo irreversibile che sarebbe stato la nascita del principato. Questo audioBook che fa parte della collana "Biografie Storiche", ripercorre la sua vita, ed è arricchito da testimonianze dello scrittore, biografo e filosofo greco Plutarco, e dello scrittore romano Svetonio.

©2017 GOODmood (P)2017 GOODmood

Length: 57 mins
Available on Audible
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The Gutians

Summary

Includes excerpts of ancient accounts  Includes a bibliography for further listening  Includes a table of contents   “Naram-Sin destroyed the people of Babylon, so twice Marduk summoned the forces of Gutium against him. Marduk gave his kingship to the Gutian force. The Gutians were unhappy people unaware how to revere the gods, ignorant of the right cultic practices. Utu-hengal, the fisherman, caught a fish at the edge of the sea for an offering. That fish should not be offered to another god until it had been offered to Marduk, but the Gutians took the boiled fish from his hand before it was offered, so by his august command, Marduk removed the Gutian force from the rule of his land and gave it to Utu-hengal.” (The Weidner Chronicle, 6th century BCE) World history is replete with many examples of nomadic barbarian hordes that swept into the kingdoms and countries of sedentary peoples, often leaving just as quickly as they had come. Sometimes, the hordes stayed in the territories they conquered and adopted the cultural attributes of the more sophisticated sedentary groups. It is important to know that barbarian invasions throughout history were usually not led by individuals or groups that hated or wanted to see the larger, often more powerful sedentary kingdoms or empires destroyed. Instead, they want a “taste” of it, and in many examples, they wanted to rule with the same style and ideology as the kingdom they had replaced. Many Sea Peoples bands of the eastern Mediterranean in the 13th century BCE entered the region as invaders and pirates, but many stayed and either assimilated into the sedentary kingdoms after their raids or even formed their own kingdoms, such as the Philistines, who were heavily influenced by the older kingdoms.  The Turkic nomads, Mongols, and other nomads of the steppe in the Middle Ages are another example of this phenomenon. These groups entered Europe and the Near East as classic hordes in every sense of the word, but after hundreds of years, they became part of the Christian and Islamic states in the region. Perhaps the best examples of this process is are the Germanic tribes who entered Europe, helping to bring down the Roman Empire while adopting countless aspects of Roman culture in the process, including elements of language, government, and religion.  The ancient Gutians are probably not one of the groups that come to most people’s minds when they think of barbarian hordes, but they were among the most important in the Bronze Age Near East. Little is known about the Gutians before they entered the historical record around 2200 BCE. in Mesopotamia, and even after that point, the contemporary records are open to interpretation because they are obviously biased against the outsiders. Since the Gutians had no written language, most of what modern scholars know about them has come from the works written by various groups in Mesopotamia, but they viewed the Gutians as uncivilized invaders, and with a healthy amount of fear and revulsion.  Given their foreign status and the fact that they forcibly conquered parts of Mesopotamia when they entered the historical record, the memory of the Gutians survived in Mesopotamia long after their short-lived dynasty had been overthrown. They continued to live on as a literary trope of what could happen if societies ignored their ancient cultural practices, particularly the worship of the gods and the proper maintenance of their cults. With this in mind, it is important to approach any proper study of the Gutians with the realization that nearly everything historians know about them comes from people who viewed them with absolute contempt, but along with that and available archaeological evidence, it is possible to get an idea of what the Gutians’ history was truly like.

©2020 Charles River Editors (P)2020 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Daniel Houle
Length: 1 hr and 35 mins
Available on Audible
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The Cumans and Magyars

1 rating

Summary

Of all the steppe peoples in the medieval period, perhaps none were more important to European history than the Magyars. Like the Huns and Avars before them and the Cumans and Mongols after them, the Magyars burst into Europe as a destructive, unstoppable horde, taking whatever they wanted and leaving a steady stream of misery in their wake. They used much of the same tactics as the other steppe peoples and lived a similar, nomadic lifestyle. The Magyars also had many early cultural affinities with other steppe peoples, following a similar religion and ideas of kingship and nobility, among other things. That said, as similar as the Magyars may have been to other steppe nomads before and after them, they were noticeably different in one way: The Magyars settled down and became a part of Europe and Western Civilization in the Middle Ages. The Magyars exploded onto the European cultural scene in the late ninth century as foreign marauders, but they made alliances with many important kingdoms in less than a century and established their own dynasty in the area, roughly equivalent to the modern nation-state of Hungary. After establishing themselves as a legitimate dynasty among their European peers, the Magyars formed a sort of cultural bridge between the Roman Catholic kingdoms of Western Europe and the Orthodox Christian kingdoms of Eastern Europe. Ultimately, the Magyars chose the Roman Catholic Church, thereby becoming a part of the West and tying their fate to it for the remainder of the Middle Ages.

©2020 Charles River Editors (P)2020 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Colin Fluxman
Length: 2 hrs and 23 mins
Available on Audible
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Empire Betrayed

Summary

In A.D. 29, Emperor Tiberius Caesar, living in self-imposed exile on the Isle of Capri, entrusts his Praetorian Prefect, Lucius Aelius Sejanus, with the administration of the vast Roman Empire. Under Sejanus' iron fist, and unbeknownst to Tiberius, the ranks of the Senate and equites are subsequently purged of the Praetorian's enemies. Treason trials, once prohibited in Rome, have become commonplace as Sejanus relentlessly punishes any who would defy him in his quest for power. After many years of commanding the cavalry of the Army of the Rhine, Tribune Aulus Nautius Cursor at last returns to Rome, amidst the turmoil. Two years later he is elected as a Tribune of the Plebs; the representatives of the people who hold the power of veto over the Senate. It is Cursor who discovers Sejanus' sinister plans; that he seeks to overthrow Tiberius and name himself Emperor. Duty bound to save the Empire from falling further under a tyrannical usurper, Cursor resolves to unravel the conspiracy and bring the perpetrators to justice. Aiding him is an old friend; a retired Master Centurion named Gaius Calvinus. Regrettably, they know that if successful, Tiberius' retribution will be swift and brutal, sparing neither the innocent nor the guilty. This leaves only two dark paths for Cursor and Calvinus; either allow the pending reign of terror under a ruthless usurper, or unleash the unholy vengeance of an emperor betrayed.

©2013 James Mace (P)2017 James Mace

Narrator: Jonathan Waters
Author: James Mace
Length: 4 hrs and 49 mins
Available on Audible
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Blood of the Caesars

Summary

Could the killing of Germanicus Julius Caesar - the grandson of Mark Antony, adopted son of the emperor Tiberius, father of Caligula, and grandfather of Nero - while the Roman Empire was still in its infancy have been the root cause of the empire's collapse more than four centuries later? This brilliant investigation of Germanicus Caesar’s death and its aftermath is both a compelling history and first-class murder mystery with a plot twist Agatha Christie would envy.

©2008 Stephen Dando-Collins (P)2012 Audible, Inc.

Length: 9 hrs and 43 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for What If Carthage Won the Punic Wars?

What If Carthage Won the Punic Wars?

2 ratings

Summary

Rome and Carthage rarely could maintain peace after the end of the fourth century BCE. As the two most powerful civilizations in the western Mediterranean region, they were destined to clash, curse or not. Roman historians placed the foundation of Carthage at approximately 814 BCE, several decades before Rome. The settlers of Carthage were of Phoenician descent, tracing their ancestry back to the great city of Tyre on the southern coast of Lebanon, but Carthage soon transformed from a minor Phoenician colony into the capital of its own growing civilization. The city itself was well positioned for shipping, and it soon dominated maritime trade. Along with that, the Carthaginians built a powerful and well-trained navy, whose protection, combined with its strategic location, made the city of Carthage a formidable prospect to attack. At its height, Carthage housed several hundred thousand inhabitants, living under a republican governmental system operated by the Carthaginian Senate. As Carthage grew, it began to expand, conquering by sea and establishing new colonies to improve trade networks. One of the Carthaginians’ key objectives was Sicily. Certain foreign policy decisions led to continuing enmity between Carthage and the burgeoning power of Rome, and what followed was a series of wars which turned from a battle for Mediterranean hegemony into an all-out struggle for survival. Although the Romans gained the upper hand in the wake of the First Punic War, Hannibal brought the Romans to their knees for over a decade during the Second Punic War. While military historians are still amazed that he was able to maintain his army in Italy near Rome for nearly 15 years, scholars are still puzzled over some of his decisions, including why he never attempted to march on Rome in the first place. After the serious threat Hannibal posed during the Second Punic War, the Romans didn’t wait much longer to take the fight to the Carthaginians in the Third Punic War, which ended with Roman legions smashing Carthage to rubble. As legend has it, the Romans literally salted the ground upon which Carthage stood to ensure its destruction, once and for all. Despite having a major influence on the Mediterranean for nearly five centuries, little evidence of Carthage’s past might survives. The city itself was reduced to nothing by the Romans, who sought to erase all physical evidence of its existence, and though its ruins have been excavated, they have not provided anywhere near the wealth of archaeological items or evidence as ancient locations like Rome, Athens, Syracuse, or even Troy. Today, Carthage is a largely unremarkable suburb of the city of Tunis, and though there are some impressive ancient monuments there for tourists to explore, the large majority of these are the result of later Roman settlement. The Punic Wars spanned more than a century, brought the loss of approximately 400,000 lives, and eventually led to the utter defeat and destruction of Carthage, but it was no easy victory for Rome, and on several occasions, the young Roman Republic was close to annihilation. Given what happened in the wake of the Punic Wars, historians have long been left to ponder what might have happened had the Carthaginians won, especially given how close Hannibal came to accomplishing such a victory against Rome during the Second Punic War. What If Carthage Won the Punic Wars?: An Alternative History of the Conflict Between Rome and Carthage profiles the conflict and examines how events may have gone quite differently for Europe if Rome had been defeated.

©2020 Charles River Editors (P)2020 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Daniel Houle
Length: 2 hrs and 38 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Imperadores de Roma [Emperors of Rome]

Imperadores de Roma [Emperors of Rome]

Summary

O que você sabe sobre os imperadores de Roma? Roma tinha bons e maus imperadores, egoístas e altruístas. Alguns eram sábios, outros eram tolos. E cada um deixou seu legado e sua marca nos conceitos históricos do próprio império romano. Neste livro, exploraremos os detalhes de vários desses imperadores, especialmente alguns dos mais conhecidos que foram escolhidos a dedo pelos editores deste livro.  Esta publicação esclarecerá mais os seguintes imperadores: Nero Cláudio Marco Aurélio Calígula Adriano Trajano Caracala Vespaniana Commodus Júlio César Constantino, o Grande Também nos aprofundaremos na difusão do cristianismo, na perseguição dos cristãos, nas guerras com o povo germânico, na Liturgia e em muitos outros tópicos nos quais você também possa se interessar. Este livro é uma jóia entre rochas triviais. Obtê-lo agora. Please note: This audiobook is in Portuguese.

©2020 Yanabo Navajo (P)2020 Yanabo Navajo

Narrator: Juliano Maciel
Length: 3 hrs and 40 mins
Available on Audible
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Homer

Summary

Homer's mythological tales of war and homecoming, The Iliad and The Odyssey, are widely considered to be two of the most influential works in the history of western literature. Yet their author, "the greatest poet that ever lived," is something of a mystery. By the sixth century BCE, Homer had already become a mythical figure, and today debate continues as to whether he ever existed. In Homer, Barbara Graziosi considers Homer's famous works and their impact on readers throughout the centuries. She shows how The Iliad and The Odyssey benefit from a tradition of reading that spans well over two millennia, stemming from ancient scholars at the library of Alexandria, in the third and second centuries BCE, who wrote some of the first commentaries on the Homeric epics. Summaries of these scholars' notes made their way into the margins of Byzantine manuscripts; from Byzantium the annotated manuscripts traveled to Italy; and the ancient notes finally appeared in the first printed editions of Homer. Along the way, Homer's works have inspired artists, writers, philosophers, musicians, playwrights, and film-makers. Exploring the main literary, historical, cultural, and archaeological issues at the heart of Homer's narratives, Graziosi analyzes the enduring appeal of Homer and his iconic works.

©2019 Barbara Graziosi (P)2019 Tantor

Narrator: Anne Flosnik
Length: 3 hrs and 28 mins
Available on Audible
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Les Vikings

1 rating

Summary

À la fin du VIIIe siècle, l'Europe est en émoi. Des barbares envahissent les campagnes. On les appelle Normands. Plus tard, on les nommera Vikings. Ils sont partout, ravagent l'Europe, sillonnent les mers, conquièrent l'Angleterre, s'installent en Normandie, colonisent l'Islande puis le Groenland, fondent la Russie, encerclent Byzance et débarquent, dit-on, sur le continent américain. Trois siècles plus tard, après tant de conquêtes et de colonisations, les Vikings sortent de l'Histoire médiévale. Ils entrent dans la légende. Leur aventure est une formidable épopée.Michel Datcharry est un auteur atypique, qui n'est venu à l'histoire que tardivement. Elle s'est imposée à lui naturellement au gré de ses voyages et de ses marches comme étant le meilleur moyen de comprendre le monde et les peuples qui le composent. Il y voue depuis plus de 30 ans une infatigable énergie. Basco-béarnais, il a effectué des recherches fouillées sur l'histoire des Basques et de façon plus générale sur sa région, l'Aquitaine.

©2012 Datcharry / Detroit Publishing Co., publisher library of congress (P)2012 Voolume

Narrator: Alain Moreau
Length: 1 hr and 27 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Breve historia de los celtas

Breve historia de los celtas

Summary

"Una obra que introduce en una larga y desconocida historia de siglos a través de personajes tan conocidos en el imaginario popular como Viriato, Vercingetórix o Boudicca y hechos que han provocado la admiración de la historia como la heroica resistencia de la ciudad de Numancia o el saqueo de Roma". Breve Historia de los Celtas, rubricado por Manuel Velasco es un trabajo que le ayudará a conocer la asombrosa variedad de una nación que se extendió por toda Europa, desde Grecia hasta España, e hizo del mestizaje su bandera. Conocer a los celtas es conocer una parte de aquello que nos hace europeos.El libro nos introduce a la cultura, los héroes, los ritos, la mitología y la vida cotidiana, de un pueblo que se extendió por Austria, Suiza, Francia, Bélgica, España, Reino Unido y, por supuesto, Irlanda. Dividido en tres partes, Manuel Velasco nos narra en la primera la historia de su legendaria resistencia a la conquista romana, a través de tres figuras fundamentales: el hispano-luso Viriato, el galo Vercingetórix, y la británica Boudicca, reina guerrera que arrasó la ciudad de Londinum (Londres); completa este apartado una completa descripción de la vida cotidiana de los celtas en Irlanda. La segunda se ocupa de la religión y la mitología, el paso fundamental de una mitología arcana y politeísta, a un cristianismo impulsado por San Patricio. En la tercera se incluye una valiosísima información complementaria sobre el idioma y la escritura, los nombres celtas y los lugares emblemáticos de esta cultura (finisterres). Fundamental para todos aquellos interesados en misterios como Stonehenge, Carnac o las tradiciones mágicas de los druidas, pero también para aquellos que quieran recrear la vida cotidiana y los ritos de un pueblo que está en la base de autores tan dispares y populares como Goscinny y Uderzo, y J.R.R. Tolkien. Please Note: This audiobook is in Spanish.

©2009 Ediciones Nowtilus S.L. (P)2014 Audible Inc.

Length: 6 hrs and 19 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Roman Republic

The Roman Republic

Summary

The rise and fall of the Roman Republic occupies a special place in the history of Western civilization. From humble beginnings on the seven hills beside the Tiber, the city of Rome grew to dominate the ancient Mediterranean. Led by her senatorial aristocracy, Republican armies defeated Carthage and the successor kingdoms of Alexander the Great, and brought the surrounding peoples to east and west into the Roman sphere. Yet the triumph of the Republic was also its tragedy.   In this Very Short Introduction, David M. Gwynn provides a fascinating introduction to the history of the Roman Republic and its literary and material sources, bringing to life the culture and society of Republican Rome and its ongoing significance within our modern world.

©2012 David M. Gwynn (P)2018 Tantor

Narrator: Paul Woodson
Length: 4 hrs and 23 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Ancient Greece: A Concise Overview of the Greek History and Mythology Including Classical Greece, Hellenistic Greece, Roman Greece and the Byzantine Empire

Ancient Greece: A Concise Overview of the Greek History and Mythology Including Classical Greece, Hellenistic Greece, Roman Greece and the Byzantine Empire

Summary

Explore the history and mythology of the Ancient Greeks! There are few things as fascinating and exciting as the world of Ancient Greece, and in the following book, you are going to learn everything you’ll ever need to know about the history and sociopolitical makeup of the world of Ancient Greece. Where did Greek culture come from? When did it begin to taste shape? Where there any precursors to the Ancient Greeks? How did Ancient Greece fit in with the rest of the known world during the Ancient era? What conflicts would arise out of the power struggles of the major political powers of the time? What great historical figures stepped up to lead and command their people to greatness? What innovations were advanced and implemented during this time? How did the Greek world change and develop over the course of the several centuries that compose the Ancient era of history? How did their neighbors pressure them and push them to change and adapt? What lessons can the history of Ancient Greece teach us about the Ancient world and about our world today? Find the answers to all of these questions and more:  Start your amazing journey into the world of Ancient Greece with a look at the rise of Greece in the Archaic era Follow Ancient Greece on its path to great power and prosperity and we move into the hugely important Classical era Find out how the world changed in massive ways, and Ancient Greece shifts along with the changing times of the Hellenistic era Learn all about the changing role of Ancient Greece as it takes its place in history under the rule of the Roman Empire And more Don’t wait another moment to enjoy from this information. Get your copy of Ancient Greece right away!

©2018 Eric Brown (P)2018 Eric Brown

Narrator: John B Leen
Author: Eric Brown
Length: 1 hr and 37 mins
Available on Audible
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Thrace

Summary

By the seventh century BCE, Thrace was experiencing the migration of Cimmerians and Scythians. The result was that the northern Black Sea Scythians developed first on the territory of Byzantium, and trade and industrial colonization stretched from the Golden Horn to the Sea of Azov and the lower Don region. In addition, the Sarmatians and Getae on the lower Don were also involved in a profitable trade with this area. The continuing economic and political ties with the Don region and the Getae, with trade contacts reaching the Middle Don and the Southwestern Urals, even linked Byzantium with Russia prior to Constantine. From 580 to 300 BCE, Ionian colonization of the Bosporus gave rise to a number of systems that created powerful regimes to protect their strategic assets. Spartan colonists against the Scythian state from the Dniper to the Dardanelles also created a violent combination that almost constantly placed the region in chaos. At the same time, the region helped transmit Greek culture to Central Asia and southern Russia. During the last three centuries BCE, the region focused on trade with the new masters of the steppes, the Sarmatians, living in Asiatic Scythia on its border with the European Don area. The trade network near the Don region in the beginning of the third century BCE was marked by the city of Tanais. It was not until the first century BCE that the region was firmly part of the Roman Empire, and the Romans' influence also ultimately led to the spread of Judaism and Christianity.

©2016 Charles River Editors (P)2017 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Mark Norman
Length: 1 hr and 55 mins
Available on Audible
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Roma arcaica

Summary

Roma arcaica prende avvio ab urbe condita, con il racconto intriso di storia e mito della fondazione di Roma, collocata nel 753 a.C. ma iniziata secoli prima, nell'Età del bronzo, con i primi insediamenti lungo il Tevere, ai piedi del colle Palatino. Proprio sul colle Palatino la leggenda vuole che Romolo abbia deciso di fondare la città, divenendo il primo dei Sette Re che per due secoli la governeranno, concentrando nella propria figura i poteri militare, giuridico e religioso; poteri che passando di mano in mano determineranno l'alternarsi di periodi di crescita e di rallentamento, fino a giungere al rovesciamento della monarchia e all'instaurarsi di una nuova forma di governo della res publica, la Repubblica. Nuovi uomini, i consoli, e nuove istituzioni, come le assemblee popolari e il Senato, sono necessari per regolare la vita di una città che cresce con ritmo esponenziale e che mira a un'autonomia totale dall'influenza etrusca, alla liberazione dalle invasioni celtiche e all'espansione verso il sud della penisola italica. L'audiolibro, che attraversa la storia di Roma dalla mitica fondazione all'avvio della grandiosa espansione, è realizzato a cura della redazione de il Narratore audiolibri, con riferimento alle opere degli storici e archeologi: Gianfranco Zelasco, Theodor Mommsen, Diana Bowder, Howard H. Scullard.

©2012 il Narratore Srl (P)2012 il Narratore Srl

Narrator: Eugenio Farn
Author: Autori Vari
Length: 51 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Greek Gods

Greek Gods

Summary

The ancient Greeks believed there were a great number of gods and goddesses. These gods had control over many different aspects of life on earth. In many ways they were very human. They could be kind or mean, angry or pleasant, cruel or loving. They fell in love with each other, argued with each other and even stole from each other. The ancient Greeks built great temples and sanctuaries to their gods. They held festivals in their honor, with processions, sports, sacrifices and competitions. Stories of the gods' exploits were told to children by their mothers and to large audiences by professional bards and storytellers. People today still enjoy hearing stories about the Greek gods. This book tells the tales of gods and goddesses such as Zeus, Aphrodite, Apollo, and Athena and heroes and monsters such as Helen of Troy, Perseus, and Medusa will fascinate and engage your imagination. Here is a selection of what you will learn: The creation and the gods The Olympian gods (and a few others) Prometheus, Epimetheus and Pandora Psyche and Eros Oedipus and his children The Trojan War

©2016 Brendan Gallagher (P)2016 Brendan Gallagher

Narrator: Steven Barnett
Length: 1 hr and 1 min
Available on Audible
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Slavery in Ancient Greece

Summary

Slavery was a universal and totally accepted feature of ancient Greek society, so much so that while the conditions under which slaves lived and worked varied considerably, many ordinary citizens kept at least one slave, often working alongside their owners, while larger commercial enterprises involved huge numbers, many of whom could rise to positions of authority and wealth. It was possible for some slaves to buy their freedom, while others lived and died in conditions of appalling brutality, notably in the silver mines at Laurium. The revenues from these mines paid for the fleet with which Athens defeated Xerxes and were the basis of the Attic owls, the four drachma coins that revolutionized the Athenian economy. The mines were often leased to contractors and worked by slaves and condemned criminals. The galleries averaged approximately three and a half feet in height, so most miners had to work on their hands and knees. Another specific group of slaves that suffered particularly brutal treatment was the pornai, slaves used in the brothels as prostitutes. While those sound like the conditions of slavery people are accustomed to hearing about in more modern times, other forms of slavery in Greece were quite unique, and perhaps fittingly, Sparta might have had the most unusual system of all. Sparta will forever be known for its military prowess, but the importance the Spartans placed upon being a warrior society meant their way of life was entirely dependent on a class of indentured servants known as the helots. The Spartans needed the helots to maintain the domestic front, but they also frequently brought helots to the battlefield with them, and they repeatedly had to turn their own hoplites on unruly helots to suppress potential rebellions. As this makes clear, however unpalatable it may be to modern historians who expound on the virtues of the Greek legacy to western civilization, it is indisputably the case that slavery constituted a central part of that legacy. Indeed, slavery underpinned to a large extent the very foundations of the classical Greek way of life.

©2016 Charles River Editors (P)2016 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Ken Teutsch
Length: 1 hr and 22 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Sultans

The Sultans

1 rating

Summary

This brilliantly readable work of history tells the bizarre story of the Ottoman Empire as seen through the lives of its extravagant and tyrannical sultans. With their absolute power, their love of pomp, and their overwhelming venality and corruption, rarely has a great empire been ruled by such grotesque and awesome figures. There was Suleiman the Magnificent, who allowed his wife to persuade him to murder his eldest son and his best friend; Murad III, who left 103 children behind him when he died; Mustafa, who was kept in a cage, attended by deaf-mutes, until he ascended to the throne. There were sultans who practiced their archery on living people; sultans who drowned the ladies of their harem by the score; and sultans who gave the reins of empire to their favorite eunuchs. For 400 years, they fought wars, terrorized their subjects, made Turkey into a great empire, and then allowed her to decline into ostentatious and impotent decay.

©1973 Noel Barber (P)2000 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

Author: Noel Barber
Length: 10 hrs and 22 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Roma victoriosa [Rome Victorious]

Roma victoriosa [Rome Victorious]

Summary

Javier Negrete vuelve a adentrarse en la divulgación del mundo clásico para narrar, con su maestría habitual, cómo Roma pasó de ser una más entre las pequeñas ciudades de una comarca del centro de Italia a dominar todo el Mediterráneo y convertirse en un imperio cuyo recuerdo todavía sigue marcando nuestra cultura, nuestra política y nuestros ideales.  En Roma victoriosa no dará a conocer el origen de la ciudad, de los siete reyes, de la caída de la monarquía y de los primeros siglos de la República. Asistiremos a las vicisitudes de los primeros tiempos, cuando no sólo no estaba claro si Roma llegaría a ser grande, sino incluso si sobreviviría como ciudad. Después veremos a los romanos enfrentarse con el gran general Pirro, empezar su larga historia de conflictos con los galos y mantener dos guerras largas y terriblemente cruentas con Cartago. En el ínterin, comprobaremos cómo las legiones se fueron convirtiendo en la máquina militar que admiró y aterrorizó al mundo, apoyadas por los ingenieros que construían calzadas, túneles, acueductos y máquinas de guerra. Para terminar, la conquista de Grecia no supondrá un final sino un nuevo comienzo.  Please note: This audiobook is in Spanish. 

©2011 Javier Negrete Medina (P)2020 Audible, Inc.

Narrator: Sergio Bustos
Length: 14 hrs and 58 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire

The Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire

Summary

On the horizons of many warring tribes, Roman warriors, knights from chivalric orders, and the devoted penniless appeared on a divine mission ready to conquer with an appetite for destruction, salvation, and a higher purpose. Pax Romana. Had the world ever seen the magnitude of empires as it did in the Roman Empires that would unhinge themselves from their very foundation in their attempt to dominate over kings, lords, and tribes? What caused the Romans to proclaim themselves worthy of answering a seemingly providential call to spread the Roman way? This is the story of their shifting identity over the course of a mind-boggling history in their steep ascents and defiant schisms transfixed with glory and virtue that lasted for thousands of years. It is the story of Rome's lingering origin and Rome's spirit of conquest as their enemies encircled them. The perilous protection they would offer to a papacy, besieged by perpetual land grabs of powerful nobles and distant tribes, was often compromised by their own faults, negligence and the nature of where their empire stopped and their Romanness began. They fought their own with just as much fervor as those who appeared at their fronts. Did their very spirit and ascent imperil that which united them, dividing them, as the world around them embraced or rejected their very foundation?

©2016 Michael Klein (P)2016 Michael Klein

Narrator: Kenneth Maxon
Length: 4 hrs and 21 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Severan Dynasty: The History and Legacy of the Ancient Roman Empire's Rulers Before Rome's Imperial Crisis

The Severan Dynasty: The History and Legacy of the Ancient Roman Empire's Rulers Before Rome's Imperial Crisis

Summary

“If a man were called upon to fix that period in the history of the world during which the condition of the human race was most happy and prosperous he would, without hesitation, name that which elapsed from the deaths of Domitian to the accession of Commodus.” (Edward Gibbon) “The Five Good Emperors,” a reference to the five emperors who ruled the Roman Empire between 96 and 180 CE (Nerva, Trajan, Hadrian, Antoninus Pius, and Marcus Aurelius), was a term first coined by Machiavelli and later adopted and popularized by historian Edward Gibbon, who said that under these men, the Roman Empire “was governed by absolute power under the guidance of wisdom and virtue.” The Severan dynasty came shortly after the Five Good Emperors, and it also consisted of five emperors who ruled the empire from 193-235, except for a brief interlude between 217 and 218 when Macrinus held the imperial throne. In chronological order, the five were Septimius Severus the Founder (193-211), Caracalla (198-217), Geta (209-211), Elagabalus (218-221), and Alexander Severus (222-235). Their reigns coincided with the period in Roman history characterized by academics as the "High Point" of the empire, but this specific dynastic period, following the troubled years after the rule of Marcus Aurelius’ son Commodus, did not see the empire return to the heights reached under the Five Good Emperors. It was a period in which the inherent weaknesses of the imperial system were exacerbated, and the policies of successive emperors paved the way for the era generally known as Rome’s Imperial Crisis or “The Time of Chaos” (235-284).  The Severans' story encapsulates many highs and lows, including able and venal emperors, expansion and loss of territory, great artistic achievements, and intellectual advancements coupled with some of the worst cruelty ever perpetrated by Romans. The Severans have also fared well historically thanks to their successors, because the 50 years following the assassination of Severus Alexander on March 19, 235, has been generally regarded by academics as one of the lowest points in the history of the Roman Empire. Severus Alexander was the last of the Severan emperors, and the subsequent years of crisis (235-285) were characterized by a series of short reigns, usually ending in the violent death of the reigning emperor. At the same time, this period of time also saw the empire beset by threatening forces on all sides. The Romans faced a newly resurgent Persia in the east, as well as significant forces from German tribes on the Rhine and Goths along the Danube. The various conflicts would result in the unprecedented death of a sitting emperor in battle, which took place in 251 with Emperor Decius, and Emperor Valerian was also captured in 260.

©2019 Charles River Editors (P)2019 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Jim D. Johnston
Length: 1 hr and 40 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Susa

Susa

Summary

Mankind has been on the planet for millions of years, but civilization and life in cities has only come about in the last five millennia. Through history civilizations rose and fell, dependent on nature, and they popped up independently in a handful of different places around the world. Each of those civilizations created a unique and distinctive vision of life which forms a vital counterpoint to the problems of modern society. The ancient land of Elam was in many ways the cradle of civilization, and its capital, Susa, is one of the oldest cities in the world. Susa is located in what is today southwestern Iran, about 150 miles north of the Persian Gulf. It served as the capital of the Kingdom of Elam, and later one of the numerous capitals used by the Persian Empire. When the third Achaemenid king, Darius the Great, established his rule over the Persian Empire, he set out to build the palace of Persepolis in his homeland. Later, he constructed an equally magnificent palace complex in his favorite city and winter capital, Susa. The most famous part of the palace was the Apadana, which was built on the ruins of an Elamite palace. Archaeological findings indicate that Susa was already an ancient city at the time of the prophet Daniel, whose tomb was in Susa, and it has become one of the holiest sites in Iran. And while the city gradually declined after the Persians were defeated by Alexander the Great, the story of its rediscovery and excavation by archaeologists from the 19th century onwards is just as exciting as the narrative of its Golden Age. The ancient city is in many ways a symbol that represents different chapters of Iran's long history, from the Elamite era to post-Islamic Iran.

©2017 Charles River Editors (P)2017 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Ken Teutsch
Length: 1 hr and 14 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Greco-Persian Wars

The Greco-Persian Wars

Summary

If you want to discover the captivating history of the Greco-Persian Wars, then pay attention.... The Greco-Persian Wars are often portrayed as a battle between good and evil. This is simultaneously an exaggeration and an oversimplification, but there is no doubt that this war, or series of wars, fought between some of the most powerful civilizations of the ancient era helped to plot the course of human history that we have been following up until this very day.  In The Greco-Persian Wars: A Captivating Guide to the Conflicts Between the Achaemenid Empire and the Greek City-States, Including the Battle of Marathon, Thermopylae, Salamis, Plataea, and More, you will discover topics such as:   On the Eve of War The Ionian Revolt Darius I Marches on Greece: The Battle of Marathon The Interwar Years: Greece and Persia Prepare to Meet Again The Invasion of Xerxes Part 1: The Battles of Thermopylae and Artemisium The Invasion of Xerxes Part 2: The Battles of Salamis and Plataea The Delian League Wars The Aftermath of the War The Greek Military The Persian Military And Much, Much More! So if you want to learn more about the Greco-Persian wars, scroll up and click the "Buy" button!

©2019 Captivating History (P)2019 Captivating History

Length: 3 hrs and 1 min
Available on Audible
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Rome and Germania

Summary

Despite all the accomplishments and widespread victories and conquests throughout the long history of Republican and Imperial Rome, general perception still deems the Romans to have failed in one crucial conquest: the subjugation of Germany. Indeed, historians have singled out this one failure as central to the ultimate downfall of the entire empire, as the constant wars against the Germanic tribes and the need to defend the frontier on the Rhine at great expense against those tribes, helped bring the empire to its knees. There are elements of truth in such a conclusion, but the reality was far more fluid than is often realized. From the first century BCE until the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in the fifth century CE, the relationships between the wider empire and those living in what is now modern Germany were extremely complicated, involving much more than simple warfare. In fact, archaeologist Are Kolberg suggested that there were four distinct aspects that must be considered: military, trade, gifts, and plunder. One could also add the political aspect to this, given the impact that German troops came to exert in the elevation of different emperors to the throne at different times.  As a Roman territory, Germania, at one point, included significant areas of land east of the Rhine, all the way up to the Elbe. The Romans would maintain a significant force on this eastern side until the third century CE, but eventually a Frankish invasion ended that presence. The term Germania came to refer specifically to the territory west of the Rhine, which included the two provinces of Germania Superior and Germania Inferior, or Upper and Lower Germany. Those provinces were key to the defense of the empire, so much so that Triers provided the location of one of the four seats of government near the end of Rome’s reign.  The people that came to be known as Germans originally came from Scandinavia and were mainly shepherds and hunters, but they comprised a number of distinct groups, the most important of which were the Goths, Vandals, Franks, and Saxons. Within each group, there were separate tribes, and as their populations grew, the land they occupied in Scandinavia was unable to support them, so they began migrating south, settling outside the borders of the Roman Empire. The Germans were fierce warriors who employed rather crude but effective tactics in battle. Their main approach was one of charging directly at an enemy and fighting hand-to-hand using their long swords and shields. Body armor was unknown, and they wore only animal-skins. Most warriors wore their hair long, dyed red, and greased into ponytails. Friction between Rome and the German tribes can be traced back as far as 113 BCE, and the next 500 years brought full-scale campaigns by the Romans against the various individual tribes, resulting in numerous battles and constant uprisings wherever any part of the land east of the Rhine was occupied for any length of time. The impact of this constant warfare on both sides cannot be underestimated, and all the while, the fighting and other interactions had massive cultural and political influences going in both directions. Rome and Germania: The History of the Roman Empire’s Conflicts and Interactions with Germanic Tribes examines the many battles and events that impacted how Rome co-existed with Germania over several centuries.

©2020 Charles River Editors (P)2020 Charles River Editors

Length: 2 hrs and 16 mins
Available on Audible
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Breve historia de Roma

Summary

Una síntesis magistral de la totalidad de la vida romana, desde su fundación hasta su ocaso a manos de los bárbaros. En esta obra, Miguel Ángel Novillo López, emprende la necesaria labor de resumir los quince siglos de la existencia de la cultura romana con fin de crear una obra altamente didáctica, amena y rigurosa. Una ventana limpia a la civilización que sentó las bases de nuestro modo de vida actual. El autor traza un amplio recorrido cronológico para explicar las bases para la fundación de Roma y el posterior devenir de este pueblo desde la monarquía a la república y, por último, al imperio que será consumido por la corrupción y la decadencia.  Pero lo verdaderamente fundamental de la obra no es, pese a ser de gran relevancia, el amplio arco cronológico que recorre, su punto fuerte es que ofrece una mirada alternativa y sobradamente detallada de la historia romana. No se centra en el devenir político y militar de la Ciudad Eterna, sino que se sumerge en cuestiones que son también fundamentales para comprender su historia como: la evolución de la esclavitud, los conflictos entre patricios y plebeyos, las magistraturas y las asambleas, la religión, la numismática o la literatura romana. Una obra esencial y necesaria para la comprensión de esta porción fundamental de la historia universal. Grabada para ser disfrutada tanto por los investigadores especializados, como por los legos, ya que no demanda un vasto conocimiento previo. Breve Historia de Roma nos sumerge, a lo largo del tiempo y del espacio, en la vida cotidiana de la Ciudad Eterna.  Please note: This audiobook is in Spanish.

©2012 Ediciones Nowtilus S.L. (P)2014 Audible Inc.

Narrator: Sergio Dore Jr.
Length: 8 hrs and 11 mins
Available on Audible
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I volti del potere - La democrazia di Pericle

Summary

I più sono ancora convinti che Atene democratica e Pericle siano sinonimi. Eppure il più grande storico di Atene, oltre che contemporaneo e ammiratore di Pericle, scrisse che il suo regime era stato in realtà una "democrazia solo a parole, di fatto un regime personale". Di fronte al caso Pericle, non si tratta solo di capire come funziona la circolarità tra élite e masse, o, come si esprimeva Tucidide, tra "guidare" ed "essere guidati". Si tratta anche di scoprire come e perché la tradizione ha riservato a Pericle un monumento e al suo vero erede, Alcibiade, la taccia di avventuriero. Come si forma, e alla fine vince, una tradizione storiografica benevola, nonostante sia stata insidiata per secoli da una documentazione ostile, se non demolitoria (e che annovera tra gli illustri detrattori persino Platone)? Sarà stata una ragione extra-politica, per esempio, un'imponente strategia di opere pubbliche e di coinvolgimento degli artisti - nel che Pericle fu maestro per i politici di ogni tempo - a salvaguardare il buon nome e la lunga durata di un leader che gli avversari non esitarono a bollare come tiranno? Cercare di capire i meccanismi del lungo predominio politico e culturale di Pericle, e il compromesso tra demagogia, potere personale e di clan che stava alla sua base, è un passaggio obbligato per intendere non soltanto l'età classica ma anche il nocciolo di ogni sistema politico.

©2019 Gius. Laterza & Figli S.p.a. (P)Emons 2019. Edizione su licenza di Gius. Laterza & Figli S.p.a.

Narrator: Luciano Canfora
Length: 1 hr and 3 mins
Available on Audible
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The Antonine Plague

Summary

“[A]s the reign of Marcus Aurelius forms a turning point in so many things, and above all in literature and art, I have no doubt that this crisis was brought about by that plague...The ancient world never recovered from the blow inflicted on it by the plague which visited it in the reign of Marcus Aurelius.” (Barthold Georg Niebuhr) “The Five Good Emperors”, a reference to the five emperors who ruled the Roman Empire between 96 and 180 CE (Nerva, Trajan, Hadrian, Antoninus Pius, and Marcus Aurelius), was a term first coined by Machiavelli and later adopted and popularized by historian Edward Gibbon, who said that under these men, the Roman Empire “was governed by absolute power under the guidance of wisdom and virtue”. Machiavelli explained, “From the study of this history we may also learn how a good government is to be established; for while all the emperors who succeeded to the throne by birth, except Titus, were bad, all were good who succeeded by adoption, as in the case of the five from Nerva to Marcus. But as soon as the empire fell once more to the heirs by birth, its ruin recommenced...Titus, Nerva, Trajan, Hadrian, Antoninus, and Marcus had no need of praetorian cohorts, or of countless legions to guard them, but were defended by their own good lives, the good-will of their subjects, and the attachment of the senate”. These 84 years also witnessed an impressive growth in the size of the Roman Empire. New acquisitions ranged from northern Britain to Arabia, Mesopotamia, and Dacia. Furthermore, existing possessions were consolidated, and the empire’s defenses improved when compared to what had come before. A range of countries that had been client states became fully integrated provinces, and even Italy saw administrative reforms which created further wealth. With all of that said, according to some academics, the success these rulers had in centralizing the empire's administration, while undoubtedly bringing huge benefits, also sowed the seeds for later problems. After all, as so many Roman emperors proved, from Caligula and Nero to Commodus, the empire’s approach to governance was predicated on the ruler's ability. When incompetent or insane emperors came to power, the whole edifice came tumbling down. Moreover, the success of the emperors ironically brought about the worst plague in Rome’s epic history. Due to constant warfare on the borders and attempts to defend positions against various groups, Roman soldiers came into contact with foreign diseases, and they unwittingly brought them home when campaigns ended. This culminated around 165 CE, when an unidentified disease brought the empire to its knees and afflicted an untold number of individuals, one of whom may have been Lucius Verus, the co-emperor of Rome alongside Marcus Aurelius. In addition to the enormous number of casualties, which has been estimated at upwards of 5 million people, the pandemic disrupted Roman trade to the east, affected societies culturally across Europe, and compelled physicians like Galen to study the symptoms in an effort to figure out not only what the disease was, but any potential cures. Of course, that was a tall task for ancient doctors with relatively primitive technology, and even today people continue to debate what the disease was and where it came from, with theories ranging from a smallpox outbreak in China, or possibly measles. The Antonine Plague: The History and Legacy of the Ancient Roman Empire’s Worst Pandemic examines the origins of the disease, theories regarding what it was, and the toll it took.

©2020 Charles River Editors (P)2020 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Jim Johnston
Length: 1 hr and 26 mins
Available on Audible
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Punic Wars

Summary

If you want to discover the captivating history of the Punic Wars, then pay attention... Some of the topics covered in part one of this book include: Never-before-told story of what the Punic Wars were all about, where it was fought, and the major events surrounding the historical war Full account of the epic battles fought during the three wars that spanned over 118 years The outcome of the many years of warfare between the two major powers: Carthage and Rome And much, much more! Some of the topics covered in part two of this book include: Rome Versus Carthage - the First Punic War Born into an Uncertain World The Element of Surprise - the Beginning of a Legend Panic in Rome and the Subsequent Raiding of Roman Territory The Rivalry Between Hannibal and Fabius Roman Devastation at Cannae More than a Decade as the Enemy Defeating Hannibal Using Politics to Improve Carthage and a Final Betrayal Cat and Mouse with Rome - Roles Reversed Speculation on Hannibal’s End and the End of Carthage in the Third Punic War The Legacy and the Legend And much, much more! So, if you want to learn more about the Punic Wars and Hannibal Barca, scroll up and click the "buy now" button!

©2020 Captivating History (P)2020 Captivating History

Narrator: Jason Zenobia
Length: 6 hrs and 31 mins
Available on Audible
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Chichen Itza

1 rating

Summary

Chichen Itza was inhabited for hundreds of years and was a very influential center in the later years of Maya civilization. At its height, Chichen Itza may have had over 30,000 inhabitants, and with a spectacular pyramid, enormous ball court, observatory and several temples, the builders of this city exceeded even those at Uxmal in developing the use of columns and exterior relief decoration. Of particular interest at Chichen Itza is the sacred cenote, a sinkhole was a focus for Maya rituals around water. Because adequate supplies of water, which rarely collected on the surface of the limestone based Yucatan, were essential for adequate agricultural production, the Maya here considered it of primary importance. Underwater archaeology carried out in the cenote at Chichen Itza revealed that offerings to the Maya rain deity Chaac (which may have included people) were tossed into the sinkhole. Although Chichen Itza was around for hundreds of years, it had a relatively short period of dominance in the region, lasting from about 800-950 A.D. Today, tourists are taken by guides to a building called the Nunnery for no good reason other than the small rooms reminded the Spaniards of a nunnery back home. Similarly the great pyramid at Chichen Itza is designated El Castillo ("The Castle"), which it almost certainly was not, while the observatory is called El Caracol ("The Snail") for its spiral staircase. Of course, the actual names for these places were lost as the great Maya cities began to lose their populations, one by one. Chichen Itza was partially abandoned in 948, and the culture of the Maya survived in a disorganized way until it was revived at Mayapán around 1200. Why Mayan cities were abandoned and left to be overgrown by the jungle is a puzzle that intrigues people around the world today, especially those who have a penchant for speculating on lost civilizations. Chichen Itza: The History and Mystery of the Mayan's Most Famous City comprehensively covers the history of the city, as well as the speculation surrounding the purpose of Chichen Itza and the debate over the buildings.

©2012 Charles River Editors (P)2015 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Doug Miller
Length: 1 hr and 3 mins
Available on Audible
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I Maya

Summary

Chi sono i Maya? Cosa realmente si sa della loro civiltà davvero unica che per molti aspetti è ancora avvolta nel mistero? Furono un popolo organizzato in classi sociali, combattivo, con conoscenze scientifiche avanzate dal punto di vista matematico e in particolare astronomico. Conoscevano l'arte divinatoria e con i loro famosi calendari di pietra erano in grado di prevedere eventi futuri. Gli avvenimenti predetti e documentati che poi sono realmente accaduti, sono numerosissimi. Si tratta di coincidenze inquietanti, o effettivamente il popolo dei Maya era in contatto con forze sovrannaturali per non dire aliene? La loro spiritualità legata a divinità buone ma anche terribili, da placare con sacrifici umani sanguinari, indica che i Maya - come d'altronde molte altre popolazioni a loro contemporanee - ritenevano di dover offrire tributi pesantissimi ai loro padroni celesti. Tutto questo era frutto di un culto primitivo basato sul timore divino, oppure c'era realmente uno scambio tra i Maya e le loro divinità? Alcuni importantissimi reperti, sembrerebbero confermalo. Molti misteri comunque non hanno ancora avuto una risposta, gli interrogativi sulla civiltà Maya sono numerosi, e forse è anche questo il motivo della curiosità e del fascino che questo popolo davvero singolare, ancora esercita. In questo audiobook, Riccardo Abati racconta la loro splendida e misteriosa storia.

©2014 Riccardo Abati (P)2014 GOODmood

Length: 1 hr and 37 mins
Available on Audible
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The Greek Dark Ages

2 ratings

Summary

When people think of ancient Greece, images of philosophers such as Plato or Socrates often come to mind, as do great warriors like Pericles and Alexander the Great. But hundreds of years before Athens became a city, a Greek culture flourished and spread its tentacles throughout the Western Mediterranean region via trade and warfare. Scholars have termed this pre-Classical Greek culture the Mycenaean culture, which existed from about 2000 to 1200 BCE, when Greece, along with much of the Eastern Mediterranean, was thrust into a centuries-long Dark Ages. Before the Mycenaean culture collapsed, it was a vital part of the late Bronze Age Mediterranean system and stood on equal footing with some of the great powers of the region, such as the Egyptians and Hittites. Despite being ethnic Greeks and speaking a language that was the direct predecessor of classical Greek, the Mycenaeans had more in common with their neighbors from the island of Crete, who are known today as the Minoans. Due to their cultural affinities with the Minoans and the fact that they conquered Crete yet still carried on many Minoan traditions, the Mycenaeans are viewed by some scholars as the later torchbearers of a greater Aegean civilization, much the way the Romans carried on Hellenic civilization after the Greeks.  Given that the Mycenaeans played such a vital role on the history in the late Bronze Age, it would be natural to assume there are countless studies and accurate chronologies on the subject, but the opposite is true. Although the Mycenaeans were literate, the corpus of written texts from the period is minimal, so modern scholars are left to use a variety of methods in order to reconstruct a proper history of Mycenaean culture, and what came after.  The Greek Dark Ages, sometimes referred to as the Homeric Age or the Geometric Period, spans the era of Greek history from the end of the Mycenaean civilization around 1100 BCE and the emergence of the Greek poleis in the ninth century BCE. It is an era that has provided little in terms of extant archaeological evidence, which in part explains the name “Dark Ages”, but this lack of evidence has led some archaeologists and historians to make the very great assumption that little of any real significance occurred during these 200 years. Instead, they view it as a sort of hiatus between the collapse of the Mycenaean culture and the emergence of Archaic Greece. As with other so-called “Dark Ages”, this assessment is simplified, and an absence of evidence should never be assumed as evidence of absence. While these two centuries were, indeed, a period of transition, they included events and developments that were specific to the time, most notably the development of iron for weaponry, and many of these developments were highly significant in the subsequent evolution of Archaic Greece. After all, it’s crucial to keep in mind that places like Athens and Sparta were inhabited throughout this time, and the impact of the Minoans, Mycenaeans, and others shaped their futures. The Greek Dark Ages: The History and Legacy of the Era Between the Fall of the Mycenaeans and the Rise of the City-States examines the overlooked time period, what life was like during it, and how it facilitated the rise of the famous poleis.

©2020 Charles River Editors (P)2020 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Colin Fluxman
Length: 1 hr and 48 mins
Available on Audible
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The Vandals

Summary

If you want to discover the captivating history of the Vandals, then keep reading... In the modern world, when one imagines a vandal, it's often a youth with a covered face drawing graffiti on a wall of a public building. And the act of deliberate defacement, destruction, or damage to public or private property is known as vandalism. This idea became an integral part of world culture with most people using it without knowing that this word is linked to an ancient Germanic tribe called the Vandals. The small number of people that are aware of this link often envision these Vandals as outright barbarians who pillaged and burned, killed and destroyed. They were the antithesis of civilized and cultured life. That image has been engraved in our collective consciousness by centuries of historical propaganda. This was possible because the Vandals didn't leave us any histories written by themselves. Thus, most of the ancient sources on their past were written by their enemies and adversaries, who didn't look too kindly on them. This is especially true for later historians who idealized ancient Rome and blamed the Vandals for its fall. But the question is, how much of it is true? This audiobook is aimed to answer that question. Were the Vandals really so wild, and were they worse than any other tribe in Europe at that time? It will also present the society and culture of this tribe in an attempt to not only shed light on their reputation in history but to also give their side of the story as the stereotypical bad guys. In essence, this guide will try to give some voice to the voiceless Vandals. Hopefully by the end of it, you will leave with your own picture of who those barbarians were. In The Vandals: A Captivating Guide to the Barbarians That Conquered the Roman Empire During the Transitional Period from Late Antiquity to the Early Middle Ages, you will discover topics such as: Origins of the Vandals From the Danube to Africa Rise of the Vandal Kingdom Downfall of the Vandals Vandal Society Religion, Culture, and the Vandals And much, much more! So if you want to learn more about The Vandals, get this audiobook now!

©2019 Captivating History (P)2020 Captivating History

Narrator: Randy Whitlow
Length: 1 hr and 45 mins
Available on Audible
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Understanding the Human Factor: Life and Its Impact

Summary

The year is 8000 B.C. A man wanders across a field of prairie grasses in search of edible berries and roots and wild game to feed his family. As he walks, the tips of the grasses brush against him, releasing seeds. He collects a few of these seeds and brings them back to his camp. Later, he notices that when they fall on earth, they begin to sprout, and a new plant grows. In small moments like these, the path of Homo sapiens is changed forever. The process of domesticating plants and animals reflects the greatest transition in the history of humankind - one that served to make us the humans we are today. In this series of 24 thought-provoking lectures, an award-winning educator takes you on a journey through this fascinating story, surveying the remarkable innovations that transformed humankind into the sole agriculturists on our planet - an innovation the human race feels to this day. Drawing on the latest science from a wide variety of fields - including microbiology, genetics, archaeology, and sociology - Professor Sojka offers a seldom-seen, multidisciplinary perspective on human life. The result is a complex and remarkable synthesis of science and history that stretches from the ancient roots of human culture to some of the most significant issues facing the modern world. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2009 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2009 The Great Courses

Narrator: Gary A. Sojka
Length: 12 hrs and 16 mins
Available on Audible
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Runes for Beginners

Summary

Everything you need to know to begin working with runes  The human language gives us the power to create. It is possible because we can use a different combination of words to express unique meanings or ideas. Today, it is still debated how many words are in the English language, with some sources such as the Oxford English Dictionary assuming that the official number is close to 750,000. Runes are a set of alphabets, just like the alphabets that exist in the languages practiced today. They prominently feature vertical and often slanted lines. This arrangement of lines serve a purpose, and they are: Parchments were an expensive commodity back then, so writing on them was not a viable option. Ink wasn't cheap, and for that reason, using it was uncommon. Therefore, runes were carved into objects and surfaces instead. Since carving was used, using straight lines was much easier than curves. While using straight lines, runes avoided the inclusion of horizontal strokes, as those lines could look like the natural lines of surfaces like wood, thereby removing any trace of the line itself. No one can establish with absolute certainty when the runes originated. One of the most popular theories is that it was developed by the Goths, a race of East-Germanic people. Historians also believe that runes have taken inspiration from the Latin alphabet. While this does not narrow down its time of origin, it gives a rough estimate, placing it in the 1st century BC. In this book, you'll discover: History of runes The power of runes Runes of the elder Futhark  The art of the runestave  How to successfully runecasting for beginners  Advanced runecasting techniques And much more! Get your copy now!

©2020 Vivienne Grant (P)2020 Vivienne Grant

Narrator: Roseann Haines
Length: 3 hrs and 58 mins
Available on Audible
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Les royaumes barbares en Occident en 1 heure

Summary

Une heure de promenade auditive chez nos ancêtres, en compagnie de Thibault de Montalembert, pour comprendre l'émergence des royaumes barbares en Occident. 01 Introduction - Les Barbares avant leur entrée dans l'Empire ; 02 Rome et ses voisins ; 03 Les formes de l'implantation ; 04 La culture barbare au Ve siècle - La construction des Etats barbares ; 05 En guise de conclusion. Les Barbares ont une drôle de réputation. Les penseurs de la Renaissance leur imputent le naufrage de la seule véritable civilisation : Rome. Les historiens du XIXe siècle leur octroient volontiers l'origine des nations européennes : les Angles n'ont-ils pas donné leur nom à l'Angleterre, les Francs à la France ? Si les chercheurs actuels ont bien abandonné ces présupposés, leur travail historique reste délicat : les populations vivant au nord du Rhin et du Danube ne maîtrisaient pas l'écrit pendant toute l'Antiquité et l'apport considérable de l'archéologie ne compense qu'en partie cette quasi-absence de textes. Une chose est sûre aujourd'hui : le modèle explicatif des "grandes migrations" n'est pas le bon. Il ne permet notamment pas d'appréhender le processus qui a abouti à la création de nouvelles identités ethniques métissées autour desquelles se sont forgés, lentement, de nouveaux peuples.

©2012 PUF (P)2010 PUF

Length: 1 hr and 3 mins
Available on Audible