Cover art for What Doesn't Kill Us

What Doesn't Kill Us

185 ratings

Summary

What Doesn't Kill Us, a New York Times best seller, traces our evolutionary journey back to a time when survival depended on how well we adapted to the environment around us. Our ancestors crossed deserts, mountains, and oceans without even a whisper of what anyone today might consider modern technology. Those feats of endurance now seem impossible in an age where we take comfort for granted. But what if we could regain some of our lost evolutionary strength by simulating the environmental conditions of our forbears? Investigative journalist and anthropologist Scott Carney takes up the challenge to find out: Can we hack our bodies and use the environment to stimulate our inner biology? Helping him in his search for the answers is Dutch fitness guru Wim Hof, whose ability to control his body temperature in extreme cold has sparked a whirlwind of scientific study. Carney also enlists input from an army scientist, a world-famous surfer, the founders of an obstacle course race movement, and ordinary people who have documented how they have cured autoimmune diseases, lost weight, and reversed diabetes. In the process he chronicles his own transformational journey as he pushes his body and mind to the edge of endurance, a quest that culminates in a record-bending 28-hour climb to the snowy peak of Mt. Kilimanjaro wearing nothing but a pair of running shorts and sneakers. An ambitious blend of investigative reporting and participatory journalism, What Doesn't Kill Us explores the true connection between the mind and the body and reveals the science that allows us to push past our perceived limitations.

©2017 Scott Carney (P)2017 Scott Carney

Length: 9 hrs and 31 mins
Available on Audible
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The Waste Land & Four Quartets

3 ratings

Summary

These are masterly readings, by renowned thespian Paul Schofield, of two substantial works of poetry by T.S. Eliot.

"The Wasteland", first published in 1922, is one of Eliot's most influential works and has long been on the syllabus for A-Level English Literature.

"Four Quartets" consists of four long poems, first published between 1935 and 1942. They are linked by common themes, and are individually "Burnt Norton", "East Coker", "The Dry Salvages", and "Little Gidding".

©2007 BBC Audiobooks LTD (P)2007 BBC Audiobooks LTD

Length: 1 hr and 34 mins
Available on Audible
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On Looking

5 ratings

Summary

From the author of the number-one New York Times mega-best seller Inside of a Dog comes an equally smart, delightful, and startling exploration of how we perceive and discover our world. Alexandra Horowitz’s brilliant On Looking: Eleven Walks with Expert Eyes shows us how to see the spectacle of the ordinary - to practice, as Sir Arthur Conan Doyle put it, "the observation of trifles". On Looking is structured around a series of eleven walks the author takes, mostly in her Manhattan neighborhood, with experts on a diverse range of subjects, including an urban sociologist, the well-known artist Maira Kalman, a geologist, a physician, and a sound designer. She also walks with a child and a dog to see the world as they perceive it. What they see, how they see it, and why most of us do not see the same things reveal the startling power of human attention and the cognitive aspects of what it means to be an expert observer. As the million-plus readers of Inside of a Dog have discovered, Alexandra Horowitz is charmingly adept at explaining the mysteries of human perception. Trained as a cognitive scientist, she discovers a feast of fascinating detail, all explained with her generous humor and self-deprecating tone. On Looking presents the same engaging combination, this time in service to understanding how human beings encounter their daily worlds and one another. Page by page, Horowitz shows how much more there is to see - if only we would really look. On Looking is nutrition for the considered life, serving as a provocative response to our relentlessly virtual consciousness. So turn off the phone and other electronic devices and be in the real world - where strangers communicate by geometry as they walk toward one another, where sounds reveal shadows, where posture can display humility, and the underside of a leaf unveils a Lilliputian universe - where, indeed, there are worlds within worlds within worlds. Alexandra Horowitz’s On Looking confirms her place as one of today’s most illuminating observers of our infinitely complex world.

©2013 Alexandra Horowitz (P)2013 Simon & Schuster, Inc.

Available on Audible
Cover art for Sapiens. De animales a dioses [Sapiens: From Animals to Gods]

Sapiens. De animales a dioses [Sapiens: From Animals to Gods]

38 ratings

Summary

El libro de no ficción del AÑO Un best seller internacional con más de un millón de ejemplares vendidos Lúcido e iluminador: la historia de la humanidad en un solo volumen. Este es el fascinante relato de nuestra extraordinaria historia: de simios sin importancia a amos del mundo. ¿Cómo logró nuestra especie imponerse en la lucha por la existencia? ¿Por qué nuestros ancestros recolectores se unieron para crear ciudades y reinos? ¿Cómo llegamos a creer en dioses, en naciones o en los derechos humanos; a confiar en el dinero, en los libros o en las leyes? ¿Cómo acabamos sometidos a la burocracia, a los horarios y al consumismo? ¿Y cómo será el mundo en los milenios venideros? En De animales a dioses, Yuval Noah Harari traza una breve historia de la humanidad, desde los primeros humanos que caminaron sobre la Tierra hasta los radicales y a veces devastadores avances de las tres grandes revoluciones que nuestra especie ha protagonizado: la cognitiva, la agrícola y la científica. A partir de hallazgos de disciplinas tan diversas como la biología, la antropología, la paleontología o la economía, Harari explora cómo las grandes corrientes de la historia han modelado nuestra sociedad, los animales y las plantas que nos rodean e incluso nuestras personalidades. ¿Hemos ganado en felicidad a medida que ha avanzado la historia? ¿Seremos capaces de liberar alguna vez nuestra conducta de la herencia del pasado? ¿Podemos hacer algo para influir en los siglos futuros? Audaz, ambicioso y provocador, este libro cuestiona todo lo que creíamos saber sobre el ser humano: nuestros orígenes, nuestras ideas, nuestras acciones, nuestro poder... y nuestro futuro. El fuego nos dio poder. La conversación hizo posible que cooperáramos. La agricultura alimentó nuestra ambición. La mitología sostuvo la ley y el orden. El dinero ofreció algo en lo que confiar. Las contradicciones crearon la cultura. La ciencia nos hizo imparables. Please note: This audiobook is in Spanish.

©2013 Yuval Noah Harari (P)2017 Penguin Random House Grupo Editorial, S.A.U.

Length: 17 hrs and 26 mins
Available on Audible
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Thunder Go North

Summary

In the summer of 1579, Francis Drake and all those aboard the Golden Hind were in peril. The ship was leaking and they were in search of a protected beach to careen the ship to make repairs. They searched the coast and made landfall in what they called a "Fair and Good Bay", generally thought to be in California. They stacked the treasure they had recently captured from the Spanish onto on this sandy shore, repaired the ship, explored the country, and after a number of weeks, they set sail for home. When they returned to England, they became the second expedition to circumnavigate the Earth after Magellan’s voyage in 1522, and the first to return with its commander. Thunder Go North unravels the mysteries surrounding Drake’s famous voyage and summer sojourn in this bay. Comparing Drake’s observations of the Natives’ houses, dress, foods, language, and lifeways with ethnographic material collected by early anthropologists, Melissa Darby makes a compelling case that Drake and his crew landed not in California but on the Oregon coast. She also uncovers the details of how an early 20th-century hoax succeeded in maintaining the California landing theory and silencing contrary evidence. Presented here in an engaging narrative, Darby’s research beckons for history to be rewritten.

©2019 University of Utah Press (P)2021 University of Utah Press

Available on Audible
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The Histories

Summary

The Roman historian Tacitus was a successful politician who eventually became governor of the province of Asia. He is thought to have died around AD 120 and benefitted from the patronage of the Flavian emperors. The Histories, of which only just over four out of 14 books survive, covers the years following the assassination of the Emperor Nero: Rome was plunged into further civil war with the Year of the Four Emperors (AD 69), which culminated in the accession of Vespasian, the first of the Flavians. Notwithstanding his proximity to the ruling family, Tacitus regretted Rome's development from republic to empire - which is especially evident in his annals. The Histories is a fascinating close-up account of a critical period in Roman history. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.  

Public Domain (P)2021 Naxos Audiobooks

Length: 10 hrs and 50 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Food, Sex, and Relationships

Food, Sex, and Relationships

1 rating

Summary

A Frank, Sensuous Banquet for the Senses with Three American Originals Get ready for a roller-coaster ride for your senses as Harriet Lerner, Mollie Katzen, and Susie Bright unleash their ideas about America's favorite taboos in Food, Sex, and Relationships. With combined book sales of over seven million copies, these three best-selling writers are at the height of their powers as they cast light in the shadowy corners of the human mind. This high-spirited dialogue covers: How food, sex, and relationships intertwine in American life today Who the real "man haters" are - the surprising truth Where to find a sexual experience that's better than an orgasm! How the foods we eat - and reject - define our very selves Food, Sex, and Relationships includes an eye-opening question-and-answer session plus an exclusive interview revealing the personal journeys that have brought these three cultural pioneers into the hearts of millions of readers and listeners.

©2010 Harriet Lerner, Susie Bright, Mollie Katzen (P)2010 Harriet Lerner, Susie Bright, Mollie Katzen

Available on Audible
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Born to Run

75 ratings

Summary

Full of incredible characters, amazing athletic achievements, cutting-edge science, and, most of all, pure inspiration, Born to Run is an epic adventure that began with one simple question: Why does my foot hurt? In search of an answer, Christopher McDougall sets off to find a tribe of the world's greatest distance runners and learn their secrets - and in the process shows us that everything we thought we knew about running is wrong. Isolated by the most savage terrain in North America, the reclusive Tarahumara Indians of Mexico's deadly Copper Canyons are custodians of a lost art. For centuries they have practiced techniques that allow them to run hundreds of miles without rest and chase down anything from a deer to an Olympic marathoner while enjoying every mile of it. Their superhuman talent is matched by uncanny health and serenity, leaving the Tarahumara immune to the diseases and strife that plague modern existence. With the help of Caballo Blanco, a mysterious loner who lives among the tribe, the author was able not only to uncover the secrets of the Tarahumara but also to find his own inner ultra-athlete, as he trained for the challenge of a lifetime: a 50-mile race through the heart of Tarahumara country pitting the tribe against an odd band of Americans, including a star ultramarathoner, a beautiful young surfer, and a barefoot wonder. With a sharp wit and wild exuberance, McDougall takes us from the high-tech science labs at Harvard to the sun-baked valleys and freezing peaks across North America, where ever-growing numbers of ultra runners are pushing their bodies to the limit, and, finally, to the climactic race in the Copper Canyons. Born to Run is that rare book that will not only engage your mind but inspire your body when you realize that the secret to happiness is right at your feet, and that you, indeed all of us, were born to run.

©2009 Christopher McDougall (P)2012 Audible Ltd

Narrator: Fred Sanders
Length: 11 hrs and 6 mins
Available on Audible
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Ten Arguments for Deleting Your Social Media Accounts Right Now

72 ratings

Summary

Ten Arguments for Deleting Your Social Media Accounts Right Now is a timely call-to-arms from a Silicon Valley pioneer.  You might have trouble imagining life without your social media accounts, but virtual reality pioneer Jaron Lanier insists that we’re better off without them. In his important new audiobook, Lanier, who participates in no social media, offers powerful and personal reasons for all of us to leave these dangerous online platforms behind before it’s too late.  Lanier’s reasons for freeing ourselves from social media’s poisonous grip include its tendency to bring out the worst in us, to make politics terrifying, to trick us with illusions of popularity and success, to twist our relationship with the truth, to disconnect us from other people even as we are more “connected” than ever, to rob us of our free will with relentless targeted ads. How can we remain autonomous in a world where we are under continual surveillance and are constantly being prodded by algorithms run by some of the richest corporations in history that have no way of making money other than being paid to manipulate our behavior? How could the “benefits” of social media possibly outweigh the catastrophic losses to our personal dignity, happiness, and freedom?  Lanier remains a tech optimist, so while demonstrating the evil that rules social media business models today, he also envisions a humanistic setting for social networking that can direct us towards richer and fuller way of living and connecting with our world.

©2018 Jaron Lanier (P)2018 Macmillan Audio

Narrator: Oliver Wyman
Author: Jaron Lanier
Length: 4 hrs and 44 mins
Available on Audible
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The Golden Bough

2 ratings

Summary

The Golden Bough, the monumental study of religious rites and practices in ‘primitive’ societies, was one of the earliest influential texts in anthropology. Its author, Sir James Frazer, surveyed the wide range of cultural habits, taboos and beliefs in communities across the world concluding that there was an observable pattern in the way magic developed into religion, though formal expression emerged in different ways.  It was a study that he continued for many years, with initial volumes appearing in 1890 and growing in size until the 12-volume edition was published in 1915. In 1922, Frazer produced his own single volume edition which is presented here. His starting point was the ‘remarkable rule which regulated the succession to the priesthood of Diana at Aricia’, where the incumbent would remain in position until slain in combat by his successor. Further study showed Frazer that this was a familiar pattern in both religion and rule.  The more he compared unconnected early societies the more similarities he found - a pattern which suggested the universal existence of basic human tendencies. His multifaceted analysis of magic and religion considers topics as various as tree worship, taboo, sacrifice, myths of Adonis and Osiris, the Corn-Mother, the transference of evil, public scapegoats and much else. He draws on evidence for these from many different societies - ranging from Babylonian, African, and Jewish to Khazar, European and Mexican.  The Golden Bough was, and remains, a remarkable achievement for its breadth and detail and proved a huge influence on numerous international figures including psychologists Sigmund Freud and C. G Jung, writers and poets James Joyce, T. S. Eliot, and Robert Graves, the mythologist Joseph Campbell and the contemporary critic Camille Paglia.  The Golden Bough helped to establish anthropology as a science. But Frazer’s methods and conclusions also drew criticism from later professionals whose detailed field studies produced a more nuanced view on rituals, beliefs and practices. Nevertheless, The Golden Bough remains a remarkable, fascinating and colourful document with its extensive range and detail on human practice.  Andrew Cullum presents this challenging, important work with clarity and sustained interest. A PDF containing chapter headings is available for download to aid the listener and show the scope of the work. It also contains a reproduction of Turner’s painting The Golden Bough, which set Frazer along his path. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio on our Desktop Site.

Public Domain (P)2020 Ukemi Productions Ltd

Narrator: Andrew Cullum
Length: 44 hrs and 16 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for How Forests Think

How Forests Think

6 ratings

Summary

Can forests think? Do dogs dream? In this astonishing book, Eduardo Kohn challenges the very foundations of anthropology, calling into question our central assumptions about what it means to be human - and thus distinct from all other life forms. Based on four years of fieldwork among the Runa of Ecuador's Upper Amazon, Kohn draws on his rich ethnography to explore how Amazonians interact with the many creatures that inhabit one of the world's most complex ecosystems. Whether or not we recognize it, our anthropological tools hinge on those capacities that make us distinctly human. However, when we turn our ethnographic attention to how we relate to other kinds of beings, these tools (which have the effect of divorcing us from the rest of the world) break down. How Forests Think seizes on this breakdown as an opportunity. Avoiding reductionistic solutions, and without losing sight of how our lives and those of others are caught up in the moral webs we humans spin, this book skillfully fashions new kinds of conceptual tools from the strange and unexpected properties of the living world itself. In this groundbreaking work, Kohn takes anthropology in a new and exciting direction - one that offers a more capacious way to think about the world we share with other kinds of beings.

©2013 The Regents of the University of California (P)2017 Tantor

Author: Eduardo Kohn
Length: 10 hrs
Available on Audible
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Sapiens

6056 ratings

Summary

Destined to become a modern classic in the vein of Guns, Germs, and Steel, Sapiens is a lively, groundbreaking history of humankind told from a unique perspective. One hundred thousand years ago, at least six species of human inhabited the earth. Today there is just one. Us. Homo Sapiens. How did our species succeed in the battle for dominance? Why did our foraging ancestors come together to create cities and kingdoms? How did we come to believe in gods, nations, and human rights; to trust money, books, and laws; and to be enslaved by bureaucracy, timetables, and consumerism? And what will our world be like in the millennia to come? In Sapiens, Dr. Yuval Noah Harari spans the whole of human history, from the very first humans to walk the earth to the radical - and sometimes devastating - breakthroughs of the cognitive, agricultural, and scientific revolutions. Drawing on insights from biology, anthropology, paleontology, and economics, he explores how the currents of history have shaped our human societies, the animals and plants around us, and even our personalities. Have we become happier as history has unfolded? Can we ever free our behavior from the heritage of our ancestors? And what, if anything, can we do to influence the course of the centuries to come? Bold, wide-ranging and provocative, Sapiens challenges everything we thought we knew about being human: our thoughts, our actions, our power...and our future.

©2017 Yuval Noah Harari (P)2017 Penguin Random House Canada

Narrator: Derek Perkins
Author: Yuval Harari
Length: 15 hrs and 18 mins
Available on Audible
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Work

3 ratings

Summary

"This book is a tour de force." (Adam Grant, New York Times best-selling author of Give and Take) A revolutionary new history of humankind through the prism of work by leading anthropologist James Suzman. Work defines who we are. It determines our status and dictates how, where, and with whom we spend most of our time. It mediates our self-worth and molds our values. But are we hardwired to work as hard as we do? Did our Stone Age ancestors also live to work and work to live? And what might a world where work plays a far less important role look like? To answer these questions, James Suzman charts a grand history of "work" from the origins of life on Earth to our ever more automated present, challenging some of our deepest assumptions about who we are. Drawing insights from anthropology, archaeology, evolutionary biology, zoology, physics, and economics, he shows that while we have evolved to find joy meaning and purpose in work, for most of human history our ancestors worked far less and thought very differently about work than we do now. He demonstrates how our contemporary culture of work has its roots in the agricultural revolution 10,000 years ago. Our sense of what it is to be human was transformed by the transition from foraging to food production, and, later, our migration to cities. Since then, our relationships with one another and with our environments, and even our sense of the passage of time, have not been the same.   Arguing that we are in the midst of a similarly transformative point in history, Suzman shows how automation might revolutionize our relationship with work and in doing so usher in a more sustainable and equitable future for our world and ourselves.

©2021 James Suzman (P)2021 Penguin Audio

Author: James Suzman
Length: 13 hrs and 47 mins
Available on Audible
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Ancient Bones

2 ratings

Summary

A thrilling new account of human origins, as told by the paleontologist who led the most groundbreaking dig in recent history. Somewhere west of Munich, Madelaine Böhme and her colleagues dig for clues to the origins of humankind. What they discover is beyond anything they imagined: the fossilized bones of Danuvius guggenmosi ignite a global media frenzy. This ancient ancestor defies our knowledge of human history - his nearly 12-million-year-old bones were not located in Africa - the so-called birthplace of humanity - but in Europe, and his features suggest we evolved much differently than scientists once believed. In prose that reads like a gripping detective novel, Ancient Bones interweaves the story of the dig that changed everything with the fascinating answer to a previously undecided and now pressing question: How, exactly, did we become human? Placing Böhme’s discovery alongside former theories of human evolution, the authors show how this remarkable find (and others in Eurasia) are forcing us to rethink the story we’ve been told about how we came to be, a story that has been our guiding narrative - until now.  PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.

©2020 Madelaine Böhme, Rüdiger Braun, and Florian Breier (P)2020 Greystone Books

Available on Audible
Cover art for The Invention of Yesterday

The Invention of Yesterday

3 ratings

Summary

From language to culture to cultural collision: the story of how humans invented history, from the Stone Age to the Virtual Age Traveling across millennia, weaving the experiences and world views of cultures both extinct and extant, The Invention of Yesterday shows that the engine of history is not so much heroic (battles won), geographic (farmers thrive), or anthropogenic (humans change the planet) as it is narrative. Many thousands of years ago, when we existed only as countless small autonomous bands of hunter-gatherers widely distributed through the wilderness, we began inventing stories - to organize for survival, to find purpose and meaning, to explain the unfathomable. Ultimately these became the basis for empires, civilizations, and cultures. And when various narratives began to collide and overlap, the encounters produced everything from confusion, chaos, and war to cultural efflorescence, religious awakenings, and intellectual breakthroughs. Through vivid stories studded with insights, Tamim Ansary illuminates the world-historical consequences of the unique human capacity to invent and communicate abstract ideas. In doing so, he also explains our ever-more-intertwined present: the narratives now shaping us, the reasons we still battle one another, and the future we may yet create.

©2019 Tamim Ansary (P)2019 PublicAffairs

Narrator: Tamim Ansary
Author: Tamim Ansary
Length: 17 hrs and 4 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Debt - Updated and Expanded

Debt - Updated and Expanded

83 ratings

Summary

Now in audio, the updated and expanded edition: David Graeber's "fresh...fascinating...thought-provoking...and exceedingly timely" (Financial Times) history of debt. Here, anthropologist David Graeber presents a stunning reversal of conventional wisdom: He shows that before there was money, there was debt. For more than 5,000 years, since the beginnings of the first agrarian empires, humans have used elaborate credit systems to buy and sell goods - that is, long before the invention of coins or cash. It is in this era, Graeber argues, that we also first encounter a society divided into debtors and creditors. Graeber shows that arguments about debt and debt forgiveness have been at the center of political debates from Italy to China, as well as sparking innumerable insurrections. He also brilliantly demonstrates that the language of the ancient works of law and religion (words like "guilt", "sin", and "redemption") derive in large part from ancient debates about debt, and shape even our most basic ideas of right and wrong. We are still fighting these battles today without knowing it.

©2014 David Graeber (P)2015 Gildan Media LLC

Narrator: Grover Gardner
Length: 17 hrs and 48 mins
Available on Audible
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The Runaway Species

6 ratings

Summary

Our ability to remake our world is unique among all living things. But where does our creativity come from, how does it work, and how can we harness it to improve our lives, schools, businesses, and institutions? The Runaway Species is a deep-dive into the creative mind, a celebration of the human spirit, and a vision of how we can improve our future by understanding and embracing our ability to innovate. Composer Anthony Brandt and neurologist David Eagleman seek to discover what lies at the heart of humanity's ability - and drive - to create. Examining hundreds of examples of human creativity, Brandt and Eagleman draw out what creative acts have in common and view them through the lens of cutting-edge neuroscience, uncovering the essential elements of this critical human ability and encouraging a more creative future for all of us.

©2017 David Eagleman (P)2017 Dreamscape Media, LLC

Narrator: Mauro Hantman
Length: 6 hrs and 39 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection

The Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection

5 ratings

Summary

The Origin of Species sold out on the first day of its publication in 1859. It is the major book of the 19th century and one of the most readable and accessible of the great revolutionary works of the scientific imagination. Though, in fact, little read, most people know what it says—at least they think they do. The Origin of Species was the first mature and persuasive work to explain how species change through the process of natural selection. Upon its publication, the book began to transform attitudes about society and religion and was soon used to justify the philosophies of communists, socialists, capitalists, and even Germany’s National Socialists. But the most quoted response came from Thomas Henry Huxley, Darwin’s friend and also a renowned naturalist, who exclaimed, “How extremely stupid not to have thought of that!"

Public Domain (P)2011 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

Narrator: Robin Field
Length: 23 hrs and 9 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Lagom: The Swedish Art of Living a Balanced, Happy Life

Lagom: The Swedish Art of Living a Balanced, Happy Life

4 ratings

Summary

Uncover the secrets of the Swedish philosophy of life called Lagom - meaning 'just enough'. At its core is the idea that we can strike a healthy balance with the world around us without having to make extreme changes and without denying ourselves anything. This delightful audiobook, written by Niki Brantmark, founder and curator of the award-winning interior design blog My Scandinavian Home, gives a taste of the philosophy behind Lagom and shows how to include some of the principles in our daily lives. Includes inspirational and fun ideas to help you achieve balance, well-being and a more sustainable existence. The book is divided into three sections. Introducing Lagom to your personal life includes ideas for decluttering your home, conscious buying and embracing 'slow design'. At work, take time to balance your day with a proper lunch break and a gadget-free Sabbath, while outdoor staycations in remote settings can offer relaxation you never knew possible! Lagom at home and with our families explains the art of simple pleasures - bring-a-dish entertaining at home, of shared craft activities with our children and less-stressed homework time! And finally there's Lagom in the wider world and the principles of living sustainably - as IKEA have pledged in their Live Lagom campaign. Make some small changes, like using LED lightbulbs, taking shorter showers and upcycling, and you are living a Lagom life, a rewarding but responsible life, not denying yourself or sacrificing what you love while not taking from the planet more than you need. It's just the right amount!

©2017 Niki Brantmark (P)2017 HarperCollins Publishers

Narrator: Ana Clements
Length: 4 hrs
Available on Audible
Cover art for The History of Magic

The History of Magic

1 rating

Summary

Brought to you by Penguin.   Three great strands of practice and belief run through human history - science, religion and magic. Over the last few centuries, magic - the idea that we have a connection with the universe and that the universe responds to us - has developed a bad reputation. But it is still with us, as it has been for millennia, as Professor Chris Gosden shows in this extraordinarily bold and unprecedented history.   As Gosden argues, magic preceded religion and science, and it has been with us from the curses and charms of ancient Greek, Roman and Jewish magic, to the shamanistic traditions of Eurasia, indigenous America and Africa, the alchemy of the Renaissance, colonial dismissals of magic as backward, and quantum physics today, where magic and science converge. Today 75 percent of the adult population of the Western world hold some belief in magic, whether we believe that the mind of a patient influences recovery, or find it hard to stab a photo of a loved one.   Drawing on his decades of research around the world, with incredible breadth and authority and stunning detail - from the first known horoscope to the power of tattoos - Gosden reveals magic's positive qualities and how we might use it to rethink our relationship with the world. This timely history of human thought across thousands of years rightly shows the role that magic has played in shaping civilisation.

©2020 Chris Gosden (P)2020 Penguin Audio

Narrator: Clarke Peters
Author: Chris Gosden
Length: 19 hrs and 7 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Basques

The Basques

Summary

If you want to discover the captivating history of the Basques, then pay attention.... The Basques live in a modestly small, triangular-shaped country that straddles the farthest northeastern portion of Spain and the southeastern portion of France. While some live outside this area today, many still call this region home. These hardy people have dwelt in the foothills of the jagged Pyrenees Mountains since prehistoric times, and they’re still there to this day.  The Basques manifest a genetic makeup that is prehistorically distinct from that of their neighbors in Spain or France. This has puzzled scientists and researchers for years. A genetic study conducted by Uppsala University in Sweden in 2015 discovered that the Basques established themselves as an ethnic group during Neolithic times, anywhere from 12,000 to 4,500 years ago. The Basques were isolated from other human migrations into Europe for millennia. Anthropologists have said that they are descendants of the Neolithic farmers who intermingled with a hunter-gatherer culture. About 850,000 pure Basques live in Spain, while 130,000 dwell in France.  In this book, a great effort has been made to present the clearest explanation possible to elucidate the history of these fascinating people.  In The Basques: A Captivating Guide to the History of the Basque Country, Starting from Prehistory Through Roman Rule and the Middle Ages to the Present, you will discover topics such as: The mystery of the mountain people The ancient mystery unravels The Basques under the Roman Empire Rule under dukes, counts, and kings The Middle Ages The Late Middle Ages The modern period The twentieth century Basque terrorism The Basque country today And much, much more! So if you want to learn more about the Basques, scroll up and add it to your cart now!

©2020 Captivating History (P)2020 Captivating History

Narrator: Jason Zenobia
Length: 3 hrs and 45 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Sex Lives of Cannibals

The Sex Lives of Cannibals

11 ratings

Summary

At age 26, Maarten Troost decided to pack up his flip-flops and move to a remote South Pacific island. The idea of dropping everything and moving to the ends of the earth was irresistibly romantic. But he should have known better. This is the hilarious story of what happens when he discovers that the island is not the paradise he dreamed of. Falling into one amusing misadventure after another, Troost struggles with stifling heat, deadly bacteria, polluted seas, and toxic fish, in a country where the only music to be heard is "La Macarena". He and his stalwart girlfriend, Sylvia, contend with alarmingly large critters, a paucity of food options (including the Great Beer Crisis), and such bizarre local characters as "Half-Dead Fred" and the Poet Laureate of Tarawa, a British drunkard who's never written a poem in his life.

©2004 J. Maarten Troost (P)2007 Blackstone Audio Inc.

Narrator: Simon Vance
Length: 8 hrs and 35 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The History of Money

The History of Money

8 ratings

Summary

From primitive man's cowrie shells to the electronic cash card, from the markets of Timbuktu to the New York Stock Exchange, The History of Money explores how money and the myriad forms of exchange have affected humanity, and how they will continue to shape all aspects of our lives--economic, political, and personal.

©1998 Jack Weatherford (P)2010 Audible, Inc.

Narrator: Victor Bevine
Length: 10 hrs and 35 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Born to Run

Born to Run

331 ratings

Summary

Full of incredible characters, amazing athletic achievements, cutting-edge science, and, most of all, pure inspiration, Born to Run is an epic adventure that began with one simple question: Why does my foot hurt? In search of an answer, Christopher McDougall sets off to find a tribe of the world's greatest distance runners and learn their secrets, and in the process shows us that everything we thought we knew about running is wrong. Isolated by the most savage terrain in North America, the reclusive Tarahumara Indians of Mexico's deadly Copper Canyons are custodians of a lost art. For centuries they have practiced techniques that allow them to run hundreds of miles without rest and chase down anything from a deer to an Olympic marathoner while enjoying every mile of it. Their superhuman talent is matched by uncanny health and serenity, leaving the Tarahumara immune to the diseases and strife that plague modern existence. With the help of Caballo Blanco, a mysterious loner who lives among the tribe, the author was able not only to uncover the secrets of the Tarahumara but also to find his own inner ultra-athlete, as he trained for the challenge of a lifetime: a 50-mile race through the heart of Tarahumara country pitting the tribe against an odd band of Americans, including a star ultramarathoner, a beautiful young surfer, and a barefoot wonder. With a sharp wit and wild exuberance, McDougall takes us from the high-tech science labs at Harvard to the sun-baked valleys and freezing peaks across North America, where ever-growing numbers of ultrarunners are pushing their bodies to the limit, and, finally, to the climactic race in the Copper Canyons. Born to Run is that rare book that will not only engage your mind but inspire your body when you realize that the secret to happiness is right at your feet, and that you, indeed all of us, were born to run.

©2009 Knopf (P)2009 Random House

Narrator: Fred Sanders
Length: 11 hrs and 6 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Do Parents Matter?

Do Parents Matter?

2 ratings

Summary

When it comes to parenting, more isn't always better - but it is always more tiring. In Japan, a boy sleeps in his parents' bed until age 10, but still shows independence in all other areas of his life. In rural India, toilet training begins one month after infants are born and is accomplished with little fanfare. In Paris, parents limit the amount of agency they give their toddlers. In America, parents grant them ever more choices, independence, and attention. Given our approach to parenting, is it any surprise that American parents are too frequently exhausted? Over the course of nearly 50 years, Robert and Sarah LeVine have conducted a groundbreaking, worldwide study of how families work. They have consistently found that children can be happy and healthy in a wide variety of conditions, not just the effort-intensive, cautious environment so many American parents drive themselves crazy trying to create. While there is always another news article or scientific fad proclaiming the importance of some factor or other, it's easy to miss the bigger picture: that children are smarter, more resilient, and more independent than we give them credit for. Do Parents Matter? is an eye-opening look at the world of human nurture, one with profound lessons for the way we think about our families. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2016 Robert A. LeVine and Sarah LeVine (P)2017 Hachette Audio

Narrator: Joe Knezevich
Length: 6 hrs and 39 mins
Available on Audible
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Unbound

1 rating

Summary

Although we usually think of technology as something unique to modern times, our ancestors began to create the first technologies millions of years ago in the form of prehistoric tools and weapons. Over time, eight key technologies gradually freed us from the limitations of our animal origins. The fabrication of weapons, the mastery of fire, and the technologies of clothing and shelter radically restructured the human body, enabling us to walk upright, shed our body hair, and migrate out of tropical Africa. Symbolic communication transformed human evolution from a slow biological process into a fast cultural process. The invention of agriculture revolutionized the relationship between humanity and the environment, and the technologies of interaction led to the birth of civilization. Precision machinery spawned the industrial revolution and the rise of nation-states; and in the next metamorphosis, digital technologies may well unite all of humanity for the benefit of future generations. Synthesizing the findings of primatology, paleontology, archeology, history, and anthropology, Richard Currier reinterprets and retells the modern narrative of human evolution that began with the discovery of Lucy and other Australopithecus fossils. But the same forces that allowed us to integrate technology into every aspect of our daily lives have also brought us to the brink of planetary catastrophe. Unbound explains both how we got here and how human society must be transformed again to achieve a sustainable future. Technology: "The deliberate modification of any natural object or substance with forethought to achieve a specific end or to serve a specific purpose."

©2015 Richard L. Currier (P)2015 Audible, Inc.

Length: 10 hrs and 36 mins
Available on Audible
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Thrive

Summary

In the first book to identify demographically proven happiness hotspots worldwide, researcher and explorer Dan Buettner documents the happiest people on earth and reveals how we can create our own happy zones. Detailing extraordinary new discoveries and meticulous research on four continents, Buettner observes happiness in unlikely places and gleans surprising insight into what generates contentment and what it means to thrive. Intriguing studies debunk commonly believed myths. Think life was happier in the good old days? To the contrary, data shows that people flourish more in modern societies than in traditional, agrarian ones. Marriage, parenthood, gender equality, sociability – you'll be astonished at how (or whether) these factors figure in the happiness equation.

©2010 Dan Buettner (P)2010 Dreamscape Media, LLC

Author: Dan Buettner
Length: 7 hrs and 9 mins
Available on Audible
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The World Until Yesterday

36 ratings

Summary

Most of us take for granted the features of our modern society, from air travel and telecommunications to literacy and obesity. Yet for nearly all of its six million years of existence, human society had none of these things. While the gulf that divides us from our primitive ancestors may seem unbridgeably wide, we can glimpse much of our former lifestyle in those largely traditional societies still or recently in existence. Societies like those of the New Guinea Highlanders remind us that it was only yesterday - in evolutionary time - when everything changed and that we moderns still possess bodies and social practices often better adapted to traditional than to modern conditions.  The World Until Yesterday provides a mesmerizing firsthand picture of the human past as it had been for millions of years - a past that has mostly vanished - and considers what the differences between that past and our present mean for our lives today.  This is Jared Diamond’s most personal book to date, as he draws extensively from his decades of field work in the Pacific islands, as well as evidence from Inuit, Amazonian Indians, Kalahari San people, and others. Diamond doesn’t romanticize traditional societies - after all, we are shocked by some of their practices - but he finds that their solutions to universal human problems such as child rearing, elder care, dispute resolution, risk, and physical fitness have much to teach us. A characteristically provocative, enlightening, and entertaining book, The World Until Yesterday will be essential and delightful listening.

©2012 Jared Diamond (P)2012 Penguin Audio

Narrator: Jay Snyder
Length: 18 hrs and 31 mins
Available on Audible
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Land

Summary

The author of The Professor and the Madman and The Perfectionists explores the notion of property - our proprietary relationship with the land - through human history, how it has shaped us and what it will mean for our future. Land - whether meadow or mountainside, desert or peat bog, parkland or pasture, suburb or city - is central to our existence. It quite literally underlies and underpins everything. Employing the keen intellect, insatiable curiosity, and narrative verve that are the foundations of his previous best-selling works, Simon Winchester examines what we human beings are doing - and have done - with the billions of acres that together make up the solid surface of our planet.  Land: How the Hunger for Ownership Shaped the Modern World examines in depth how we acquire land, how we steward it, how and why we fight over it, and finally, how we can, and on occasion do, come to share it. Ultimately, Winchester confronts the essential question: who actually owns the world’s land - and why does it matter?    Supplemental enhancement PDF accompanies the audiobook.   PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.

©2021 Simon Winchester (P)2021 HarperCollins Publishers

Length: 13 hrs and 46 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Lasting Love (Live)

Lasting Love (Live)

Summary

Gay and Katie Hendricks have spent over 25 years developing "kitchen and bedroom tested" methods for building relationships that work, thrive, and grow. Their emphasis is on cultivating lasting love by accepting, and even encouraging, differences - without trying to change one another. Their methods encourage openness, identification of real feelings, and shared commitment to the relationship. In this live presentation, Gay and Katie talk about: Why opposites really do attract Fights that begin just when things are going "too well" Getting and staying in touch with here-and-now feelings Five "secrets" for strengthening loving relationships

©2006 Better Life Media, Inc. (P)2006 Better Life Media, Inc.

Available on Audible
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There Are No Grown-Ups

6 ratings

Summary

The best-selling author of Bringing Up Bébé investigates life in her 40s, and wonders whether her mind will ever catch up with her face. When Pamela Druckerman turns 40, waiters start calling her "Madame", and she detects a disturbing new message in mens' gazes: I would sleep with her, but only if doing so required no effort whatsoever. Yet 40 isn't even technically middle-aged anymore. And after a lifetime of being clueless, Druckerman can finally grasp the subtext of conversations, maintain (somewhat) healthy relationships and spot narcissists before they ruin her life. What are the modern 40s, and what do we know once we reach them? What makes someone a "grown-up" anyway? And why didn't anyone warn us that we'd get cellulite on our arms? Part frank memoir, part hilarious investigation of daily life, There Are No Grown-Ups diagnoses the in-between decade when... Everyone you meet looks a little bit familiar. You're matter-of-fact about chin hair. You can no longer wear anything ironically. There's at least one sport your doctor forbids you to play. You become impatient while scrolling down to your year of birth. Your parents have stopped trying to change you. You don't want to be with the cool people anymore; you want to be with your people. You realize that everyone is winging it, some just do it more confidently. You know that it's OK if you don't like jazz. Internationally best-selling author and New York Times contributor Pamela Druckerman leads us on a quest for wisdom, self-knowledge, and the right pair of pants. A witty dispatch from the front lines of the 40s, There Are No Grown-ups is a (midlife) coming-of-age story, and an audiobook for anyone trying to find their place in the world.

©2018 Pamela Druckerman (P)2018 Penguin Audio

Length: 6 hrs and 41 mins
Available on Audible
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Classic Krakauer

7 ratings

Summary

Spanning an extraordinary range of subjects and locations, these 10 gripping essays show why Jon Krakauer is considered a standard-bearer of modern journalism. His pieces take us from a horrifying avalanche on Mount Everest to a volcano poised to obliterate a big chunk of Seattle; from a wilderness teen-therapy program run by apparent sadists to an otherworldly cave in New Mexico, studied by NASA to better understand Mars; from the notebook of one Fred Beckey, who catalogued the greatest unclimbed mountaineering routes on the planet, to the last days of legendary surfer Mark Foo.  Bringing together work originally published in such magazines as The New Yorker, Outside, and Smithsonian - all rigorously researched, vividly written, and marked by an unerring instinct for storytelling and scoop - Classic Krakauer powerfully demonstrates the author’s ambivalent love affair with unruly landscapes and his relentless search for truth. 

©2018 Jon Krakauer (P)2018 Random House Audio

Narrator: Scott Brick
Author: Jon Krakauer
Length: 5 hrs and 28 mins
Available on Audible
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Out of the Shadows

1 rating

Summary

It goes without saying that even today, it's not easy to be gay in America. While young gay men often come out more readily, even those from the most progressive of backgrounds still struggle with the legacy of early-life stigma and a deficit of self-acceptance, which can fuel doubt, regret, and, at worst, self-loathing. And this is to say nothing of the ongoing trauma wrought by AIDS, which is all too often relegated to history. Drawing on his work as a clinical psychologist during and in the aftermath of the epidemic, Walt Odets reflects on what it means to survive and figure out a way to live in a new, uncompromising future, both for the men who endured the upheaval of those years and for the younger men who have come of age since then, at a time when HIV is still deeply affecting gay communities, especially among the most marginalized.  Through moving stories - of friends and patients, and his own - Odets considers how experiences early in life launch men on trajectories aimed at futures that are not authentically theirs. He writes to help reconstruct how we think about gay life by considering everything from the misleading idea of "the homosexual", to the diversity and richness of gay relationships, to the historical role of stigma and shame and the significance of youth and of aging.

©2019 Walt Whitman Odets (P)2019 HighBridge, a division of Recorded Books

Narrator: Will Damron
Author: Walt Odets
Length: 12 hrs and 28 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Life Inc.

Life Inc.

Summary

A captivating book that reveals how corporations have come to dominate all aspects of life - including our inner lives - and what to do about it.Something has gone terribly wrong. Unquestionably, but seemingly inexplicably, we now live in a world where the market has infiltrated every area of our lives.In Life Inc., brilliant and charismatic cultural theorist Douglas Rushkoff argues that we no longer know who we are, or what we want. Everything, especially authenticity, is branded. Real community and real intimacy have broken down, replaced by market-tested cures for everything from weight, to conception, to poverty, to food, to finding a mate. The market, and its operating system, Corporatism, is no longer something people build and control. Rather, it builds and controls us.Rushkoff, in tracing the roots of corporatism from the Renaissance to today, reveals the way it supplanted social interaction and local commerce and came to be regarded as a preexisting condition of our world, from the history of public relations to the relentless gentrification of America's urban neighborhoods. And he shows us how to fight back: how to de-corporatize ourselves, disengage from branded expectations, think locally, and return to the real world of human activity. As Rushkoff puts it, "Micro-decisions are what matter."

©2009 Douglas Rushkoff (P)2009 Random House Audio

Length: 11 hrs and 28 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for African Origin of Civilization - The Myth or Reality

African Origin of Civilization - The Myth or Reality

2 ratings

Summary

This classic presents historical, archaeological, and anthropological evidence to support the theory that ancient Egypt was a black civilization.

©2020 Anta Diop (P)2020 Anta Diop

Narrator: Frank Block
Length: 9 hrs and 55 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Mushroom at the End of the World

The Mushroom at the End of the World

16 ratings

Summary

Matsutake is the most valuable mushroom in the world - and a weed that grows in human-disturbed forests across the northern hemisphere. Through its ability to nurture trees, matsutake helps forests to grow in daunting places. It is also an edible delicacy in Japan, where it sometimes commands astronomical prices. In all its contradictions, matsutake offers insights into areas far beyond just mushrooms and addresses a crucial question: what manages to live in the ruins we have made? A tale of diversity within our damaged landscapes, The Mushroom at the End of the World follows one of the strangest commodity chains of our times to explore the unexpected corners of capitalism. Here, we witness the varied and peculiar worlds of matsutake commerce: the worlds of Japanese gourmets, capitalist traders, Hmong jungle fighters, industrial forests, Yi Chinese goat herders, Finnish nature guides, and more. These companions also lead us into fungal ecologies and forest histories to better understand the promise of cohabitation in a time of massive human destruction.

©2015 Princeton University Press (P)2017 Tantor

Narrator: Susan Ericksen
Length: 11 hrs and 6 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Social Leap

The Social Leap

35 ratings

Summary

In the compelling popular science tradition of Sapiens and Guns, Germs, and Steel, a groundbreaking and eye-opening exploration that applies evolutionary science to provide a new perspective on human psychology, revealing how major challenges from our past have shaped some of the most fundamental aspects of our being. The most fundamental aspects of our lives - from leadership and innovation to aggression and happiness - were permanently altered by the "social leap" our ancestors made from the rain forest to the Savannah. Their struggle to survive on the open grasslands required a shift from individualism to a new form of collectivism, which forever altered the way our mind works. It changed the way we fight and our proclivity to make peace, it changed the way we lead and the way we follow, it made us innovative but not inventive, it created a new kind of social intelligence, and it led to new sources of life satisfaction. In The Social Leap, William von Hippel lays out this revolutionary hypothesis, tracing human development through three critical evolutionary inflection points to explain how events in our distant past shape our lives today. From the mundane, such as why we exaggerate, to the surprising, such as why we believe our own lies and why fame and fortune are as likely to bring misery as happiness, the implications are far-reaching and extraordinary. Blending anthropology, biology, history, and psychology with evolutionary science, The Social Leap is a fresh and provocative look at our species that provides new clues about who we are, what makes us happy, and how to use this knowledge to improve our lives.

©2018 William von Hippel (P)2018 HarperCollins Publishers

Length: 8 hrs and 36 mins
Available on Audible
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A Long Way Home

17 ratings

Summary

At only five years old, Saroo Brierley got lost on a train in India. Unable to read or write or recall the name of his hometown or even his own last name, he survived alone for weeks on the rough streets of Calcutta before ultimately being transferred to an agency and adopted by a couple in Australia. Despite his gratitude, Brierley always wondered about his origins. Eventually, with the advent of Google Earth, he had the opportunity to look for the needle in a haystack he once called home and pore over satellite images for landmarks he might recognize or mathematical equations that might further narrow down the labyrinthine map of India. One day, after years of searching, he miraculously found what he was looking for and set off to find his family. A Long Way Home is a moving, poignant, and inspirational true story of survival and triumph against incredible odds. It celebrates the importance of never letting go of what drives the human spirit: Hope.

©2014 Saroo Brierley (P)2014 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

Narrator: Vikas Adam
Length: 7 hrs and 28 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Gene

The Gene

84 ratings

Summary

From the Pulitzer Prize-winning, best-selling author of The Emperor of All Maladies, a magnificent history of the gene and a response to the defining question of the future: What becomes of being human when we learn to "read" and "write" our own genetic information? The extraordinary Siddhartha Mukherjee has written a biography of the gene as deft, brilliant, and illuminating as his extraordinarily successful biography of cancer. Weaving science, social history, and personal narrative to tell us the story of one of the most important conceptual breakthroughs of modern times, Mukherjee animates the quest to understand human heredity and its surprising influence on our lives, personalities, identities, fates, and choices. Throughout the narrative, the story of Mukherjee's own family - with its tragic and bewildering history of mental illness - cuts like a bright red line, reminding us of the many questions that hang over our ability to translate the science of genetics from the laboratory to the real world. In superb prose and with an instinct for the dramatic scene, he describes the centuries of research and experimentation - from Aristotle and Pythagoras to Mendel and Darwin, from Boveri and Thomas Morgan to Crick, Watson, and Rosa Franklin, all the way through the revolutionary 21st-century innovators who mapped the human genome. As The New Yorker said of The Emperor of All Maladies, "It's hard to think of many books for a general audience that have rendered any area of modern science and technology with such intelligence, accessibility, and compassion.... An extraordinary achievement." A riveting, revelatory, and magisterial history of a scientific idea coming to life and an essential preparation for the moral complexity introduced by our ability to create or "write" the human genome, The Gene is a must-listen for everyone concerned about the definition and future of humanity. This is the most crucial science of our time, intimately explained by a master. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2016 Siddhartha Mukherjee (P)2016 Simon & Schuster

Length: 19 hrs and 22 mins
Available on Audible
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Free to Learn

14 ratings

Summary

Our children spend their days being passively instructed and made to sit still and take tests, ?often against their will. We call this imprisonment schooling yet wonder why kids become bored and misbehave. Even outside of school children today seldom play and explore without adult supervision and are afforded few opportunities to control their own lives. The result: anxious, unfocused children who see schooling ?and life? as a series of hoops to struggle through. In Free to Learn, developmental psychologist Peter Gray argues that our children, if free to pursue their own interests through play, will not only learn all they need to know but will do so with energy and passion. Children come into this world burning to learn, equipped with the curiosity, playfulness, and sociability to direct their own education. Yet we have squelched such instincts in a school model originally developed to indoctrinate, not to promote intellectual growth. To foster children who will thrive in today's constantly changing world, we must entrust them to steer their own learning and development. Drawing on evidence from anthropology, psychology, and history, Gray demonstrates that free play is the primary means by which children learn to control their lives, solve problems, get along with peers, and become emotionally resilient. This capacity to learn through play evolved long ago, in hunter-gatherer bands where children acquired the skills of the culture through their own initiatives. And these instincts still operate remarkably well today, as studies at alternative, democratically administered schools show. When children are in charge of their own education, they learn better ?and at lower cost than the traditional model of coercive schooling. A brave, counterintuitive proposal for freeing our children from the shackles of the curiosity-killing institution we call school, Free to Learn suggests that it's time to stop asking what's wrong with our children and start asking what's wrong with the system. It shows how we can act ?both as parents and as members of society ?to improve children's lives and promote their happiness and learning.

©2013 Peter Gray (P)2018 Hachette Audio

Narrator: Dan Woren
Author: Peter Gray
Length: 9 hrs and 57 mins
Available on Audible
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Denisovan Origins

11 ratings

Summary

Reveals the profound influence of the Denisovans and their hybrid descendants upon the flowering of human civilization around the world Traces the migrations of the sophisticated Denisovans and their interbreeding with Neanderthals and early human populations more than 40,000 years ago Shows how Denisovan hybrids became the elite of ancient societies, including the Adena mound-building culture Explores the Denisovans’ extraordinary advances, including precision-machined stone tools and jewelry, tailored clothing, and celestially-aligned architecture Ice-age cave artists, the builders at Göbekli Tepe, and the mound-builders of North America all share a common ancestry in the Solutreans, Neanderthal-human hybrids of immense sophistication, who dominated southwest Europe before reaching North America 20,000 years ago. Yet, even before the Solutreans, the American continent was home to a powerful population of enormous stature, giants remembered in Native American legend as the Thunder People. New research shows they were hybrid descendants of an extinct human group known as the Denisovans, whose existence has now been confirmed from fossil remains found in a cave in the Altai region of Siberia. Tracing the migrations of the Denisovans and their interbreeding with Neanderthals and early human populations in Asia, Europe, Australia, and the Americas, Andrew Collins and Greg Little explore how the new mental capabilities of the Denisovan-Neanderthal and Denisovan-human hybrids greatly accelerated the flowering of human civilization over 40,000 years ago. They show how the Denisovans displayed sophisticated advances, including precision-machined stone tools and jewelry, tailored clothing, celestially-aligned architecture, and horse domestication. Examining evidence from ancient America, the authors reveal how Denisovan hybrids became the elite of the Adena mound-building culture, explaining the giant skeletons found in Native American burial mounds. The authors also explore how the Denisovans’ descendants were the creators of a cosmological death journey and viewed the Milky Way as the Path of Souls. Revealing the impact of the Denisovans upon every part of the world, the authors show that, without early man’s hybridization with Denisovans, Neanderthals, and other yet-to-be-discovered hominid populations, the modern world as we know it would not exist.

©2019 Andrew Collins and Gregory L. Little (P)2019 Inner Traditions Audio

Available on Audible
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Lost in Shangri-La

9 ratings

Summary

On May 13, 1945, 24 American servicemen and WACs boarded a transport plane for a sightseeing trip over “Shangri-La,” a beautiful and mysterious valley deep within the jungle-covered mountains of Dutch New Guinea .Unlike the peaceful Tibetan monks of James Hilton’s best-selling novel Lost Horizon, , this Shangri-La was home to spear-carrying tribesmen, warriors rumored to be cannibals. But the pleasure tour became an unforgettable battle for survival when the plane crashed. Miraculously, three passengers pulled through. Margaret Hastings, barefoot and burned, had no choice but to wear her dead best friend’s shoes. John McCollom, grieving the death of his twin brother also aboard the plane, masked his grief with stoicism. Kenneth Decker, too, was severely burned and suffered a gaping head wound. Emotionally devastated, badly injured, and vulnerable to the hidden dangers of the jungle, the trio faced certain death unless they left the crash site. Caught between man-eating headhunters and enemy Japanese, the wounded passengers endured a harrowing hike down the mountainside - a journey into the unknown that would lead them straight into a primitive tribe of superstitious natives who had never before seen a white man - or woman. Drawn from interviews, declassified U.S. Army documents, personal photos and mementos, a survivor’s diary, a rescuer’s journal, and original film footage, Lost in Shangri-La recounts this incredible true-life adventure for the first time. Mitchell Zuckoff reveals how the determined trio - dehydrated, sick, and in pain - traversed the dense jungle to find help; how a brave band of paratroopers risked their own lives to save the survivors; and how a cowboy colonel attempted a previously untested rescue mission to get them out. By trekking into the New Guinea jungle, visiting remote villages, and rediscovering the crash site, Zuckoff also captures the contemporary natives’ remembrances of the long-ago day when strange creatures fell from the sky. A riveting work of narrative nonfiction that vividly brings to life an odyssey at times terrifying, enlightening, and comic, Lost in Shangri-La is a thrill ride from beginning to end.

©2011 Mitchell Zuckoff (P)2011 HarperCollins Publishers

Length: 8 hrs and 32 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Mysteries of the Middle Ages

Mysteries of the Middle Ages

1 rating

Summary

After the long period of cultural decline known as the Dark Ages, Europe experienced a rebirth of scholarship, art, literature, philosophy, and science and began to develop a vision of Western society that remains at the heart of Western civilization today.   By placing the image of the Virgin Mary at the center of their churches and their lives, medieval people exalted womanhood to a level unknown in any previous society. For the first time, men began to treat women with dignity and women took up professions that had always been closed to them. The communion bread, believed to be the body of Jesus, encouraged the formulation of new questions in philosophy: Could reality be so fluid that one substance could be transformed into another? Could ordinary bread become a holy reality? Could mud become gold, as the alchemists believed? These new questions pushed the minds of medieval thinkers toward what would become modern science. Artists began to ask themselves similar questions. How can we depict human anatomy so that it looks real to the viewer? How can we depict motion in a composition that never moves? How can two dimensions appear to be three? Medieval artists (and writers, too) invented the Western tradition of realism. On visits to the great cities of Europe - monumental Rome; the intellectually explosive Paris of Peter Abelard and Thomas Aquinas; the hotbed of scientific study that was Oxford; and the incomparable Florence of Dante and Giotto - Cahill brilliantly captures the spirit of experimentation, the colorful pageantry, and the passionate pursuit of knowledge that built the foundations for the modern world.

©2006 Thomas Cahill (P)2006 Books on Tape

Narrator: John Lee
Length: 10 hrs and 18 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Age of Wood

The Age of Wood

1 rating

Summary

A groundbreaking examination of the role that wood and trees have played in our global ecosystem - including human evolution and the rise and fall of empires - in the best-selling tradition of Yuval Harari's Sapiens and Mark Kurlansky's Salt. As the dominant species on Earth, humans have made astonishing progress since our ancestors came down from the trees. But how did the descendants of small primates manage to walk upright, become top predators, and populate the world? How were humans able to develop civilizations and produce a globalized economy? Now, in The Age of Wood, Roland Ennos shows for the first time that the key to our success has been our relationship with wood. Brilliantly synthesizing recent research with existing knowledge in fields as wide-ranging as primatology, anthropology, archaeology, history, architecture, engineering, and carpentry, Ennos reinterprets human history and shows how our ability to exploit wood's unique properties has profoundly shaped our bodies and minds, societies, and lives. He takes us on a sweeping 10 million-year journey from Southeast Asia and West Africa where great apes swing among the trees, build nests, and fashion tools; to East Africa where hunter gatherers collected their food; to the structural design of wooden temples in China and Japan; and to Northern England, where archaeologists trace how coal enabled humans to build an industrial world.  Addressing the effects of industrialization - including the use of fossil fuels and other energy-intensive materials to replace timber - The Age of Wood not only shows the essential role that trees play in the history and evolution of human existence, but also argues that for the benefit of our planet we must return to more traditional ways of growing, using, and understanding trees. A winning blend of history and science, this is a fascinating and authoritative work for anyone interested in nature, the environment, and the making of the world as we know it.

©2020 Roland Ennos. All rights reserved. (P)2020 Simon & Schuster, Inc. All rights reserved.

Author: Roland Ennos
Length: 8 hrs and 25 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for American Colossus

American Colossus

2 ratings

Summary

From best-selling historian H. W. Brands, a sweeping chronicle of how a few wealthy businessmen reshaped America from a land of small farmers and small businessmen into an industrial giant. The three decades after the Civil War saw a wholesale shift in American life, and the cause was capitalism. Driven by J. P. Morgan, Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, and oth­ers like them, armies of men and women were harnessed to a new vision of massive industry. A society rooted in the soil became one based in cities, and legions of immigrants were drawn to American shores. H. W. Brands’ American Colossus portrays the stunning trans­formation of the landscape and institutions of American life in these years. Brands charts the rise of Wall Street, the growth of a national economy, the building of the railroads, and the first sparks of union life. By 1900, America was wealthier than ever, yet prosperity was precarious, inequality rampant, and democ­racy stretched thin. A populist backlash stirred. American Colossus is an unforgettable portrait of the years when a recognizably modern America first took shape.

©2010 H.W. Brands (P)2010 Random House Audio

Narrator: Robertson Dean
Author: H. W. Brands
Length: 23 hrs and 29 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Summary of The Coddling of the American Mind

Summary of The Coddling of the American Mind

1 rating

Summary

Suicide, anxiety, and depression are on the rise in college campuses! What should we do? Greg Lukianoff and Jonathon Haidt expose the reasons behind the increase of anxiety, depression, and suicide on college campuses today. They expose the three great untruths that have been indoctrinated into our young people through parenting and education and how policy has shut down the right to free speech, critical thinking, and social integration. After an explanation as to the foundation of the problems, Lukianoff and Haidt shed light on psychological truths, parenting skills, suggestions for positive changes in the education system, and step-by-step instructions for cognitive behavioral therapy. In this detailed summary and analysis of The Coddling of the American Mind, you'll earn shocking facts, like: Safety: what it is and why it isn't necessarily the best option Exactly what is contributing to the rise of mental illness in young people (It'll shock you) Exciting concepts that, if followed, could dramatically affect our school systems for the better And much more!  Educate yourself! Scroll to the top and buy now. Note to listeners: This is a summary and analysis companion book based on Greg Lukianoff and Johnathan Haidt's The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas are Setting Up a Generation for Failure. This fan-based excerpt is meant to enhance your original reading/listening experience, not supplement it. We strongly encourage you to purchase the original book. 

©2020 Scorpio Digital Press (P)2020 Scorpio Digital Press

Narrator: Chris Johnson
Length: 1 hr and 15 mins
Available on Audible
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Underground

1 rating

Summary

A panoramic investigation of the subterranean landscape, from sacred caves and derelict subway stations to nuclear bunkers and ancient underground cities - an exploration of the history, science, architecture, and mythology of the worlds beneath our feet. When Will Hunt was 16 years old, he discovered an abandoned tunnel that ran beneath his house in Providence, Rhode Island. His first tunnel trips inspired a lifelong fascination with exploring underground worlds, from the derelict subway stations and sewers of New York City to the sacred caves, catacombs, and tombs, from bunkers to ancient underground cities in more than 20 countries around the world. Underground is both a personal exploration of Hunt’s obsession and a panoramic study of how we are all connected to the underground, how caves and other dark hollows have frightened and enchanted, repelled and captivated us through the ages. In a narrative spanning continents and epochs, Hunt follows a cast of subterranea-philes who have dedicated themselves to investigating underground worlds. He tracks the origins of life with a team of NASA microbiologists a mile beneath the Black Hills, camps out for three days with urban explorers in the catacombs and sewers of Paris, descends with an Aboriginal family into a 35,000-year-old sacred mine in the Australian outback, follows a ghostlike graffiti artist writing stories in the subway tunnels of New York, and glimpses a sacred sculpture molded by Paleolithic artists in the depths of a cave in the Pyrenees. Each adventure is woven with findings in mythology and anthropology, natural history and neuroscience, literature and philosophy. In elegant and graceful prose, Hunt cures us of our “surface chauvinism”, opening our eyes to the planet’s hidden dimension. He reveals how the subterranean landscape gave shape to our most basic beliefs, including how we think about ourselves as humans. At bottom, Underground is a meditation on the allure of darkness, the power of mystery, and our eternal desire to connect with what we cannot see. Advance praise for Underground: “An unusual and intriguing travel book.... As [Will] Hunt reveals the scientific, historic, literary, psychological, spiritual, and metaphorical qualities of his exploration, it begins to seem less idiosyncratic than universal, a pull that has persisted throughout civilization and a mystery that has yet to be solved. The underground may represent hell to some, but it has also provided spiritual solace for centuries.... A vivid illumination of the dark and an effective evocation of its profound mystery.” (Kirkus Reviews, starred review) 

©2019 Will Hunt (P)2019 Random House Audio

Narrator: Will Hunt
Author: Will Hunt
Length: 6 hrs and 41 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The WEIRDest People in the World

The WEIRDest People in the World

1 rating

Summary

A bold, epic account of how the co-evolution of psychology and culture created the peculiar Western mind that has profoundly shaped the modern world. Perhaps you are WEIRD: raised in a society that is Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich, and Democratic. If so, you’re rather psychologically peculiar. Unlike much of the world today, and most people who have ever lived, WEIRD people are highly individualistic, self-obsessed, control-oriented, nonconformist, and analytical. They focus on themselves—their attributes, accomplishments, and aspirations—over their relationships and social roles. How did WEIRD populations become so psychologically distinct? What role did these psychological differences play in the industrial revolution and the global expansion of Europe during the last few centuries? In The WEIRDest People in the World, Joseph Henrich draws on cutting-edge research in anthropology, psychology, economics, and evolutionary biology to explore these questions and more. He illuminates the origins and evolution of family structures, marriage, and religion, and the profound impact these cultural transformations had on human psychology. Mapping these shifts through ancient history and late antiquity, Henrich reveals that the most fundamental institutions of kinship and marriage changed dramatically under pressure from the Roman Catholic Church. It was these changes that gave rise to the WEIRD psychology that would coevolve with impersonal markets, occupational specialization, and free competition—laying the foundation for the modern world. Provocative and engaging in both its broad scope and its surprising details, The WEIRDest People in the World explores how culture, institutions, and psychology shape one another, and explains what this means for both our most personal sense of who we are as individuals and also the large-scale social, political, and economic forces that drive human history. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.

©2020 Joseph Henrich (P)2020 Brilliance Publishing, Inc., all rights reserved.

Narrator: Korey Jackson
Length: 19 hrs and 3 mins
Available on Audible
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The Antidote

62 ratings

Summary

The Antidote is a series of journeys among people who share a single, surprising way of thinking about life. What they have in common is a hunch about human psychology: that it’s our constant effort to eliminate the negative that causes us to feel so anxious, insecure, and unhappy. And that there is an alternative "negative path" to happiness and success that involves embracing the things we spend our lives trying to avoid. It is a subversive, galvanizing message, which turns out to have a long and distinguished philosophical lineage ranging from ancient Roman Stoic philosophers to Buddhists. Oliver Burkeman talks to life coaches paid to make their clients’ lives a living hell, and to maverick security experts such as Bruce Schneier, who contends that the changes we’ve made to airport and aircraft security since the 9/11 attacks have actually made us less safe. And then there are the "backwards" business gurus, who suggest not having any goals at all and not planning for a company’s future. Burkeman’s new audiobook is a witty, fascinating, and counterintuitive listen that turns decades of self-help advice on its head and forces us to rethink completely our attitudes toward failure, uncertainty, and death.

©2012 Oliver Burkeman (P)2013 Audible, Inc.

Narrator: Oliver Burkeman
Length: 6 hrs and 13 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Misreading Scripture with Western Eyes

Misreading Scripture with Western Eyes

23 ratings

Summary

What was clear to the original readers of Scripture is not always clear to us. Because of the cultural distance between the biblical world and our contemporary setting, we often bring modern Western biases to the text. For example: When Western readers hear Paul exhorting women to "dress modestly", we automatically think in terms of sexual modesty. But most women in that culture would never wear racy clothing. The context suggests that Paul is likely more concerned about economic modesty - that Christian women not flaunt their wealth through expensive clothes, braided hair, and gold jewelry. Some readers might assume that Moses married "below himself" because his wife was a dark-skinned Cushite. Actually, Hebrews were the slave race, not the Cushites, who were highly respected. Aaron and Miriam probably thought Moses was being presumptuous by marrying "above himself". Western individualism leads us to assume that Mary and Joseph traveled alone to Bethlehem. What went without saying was that they were likely accompanied by a large entourage of extended family. Biblical scholars Brandon O'Brien and Randy Richards shed light on the ways that Western readers often misunderstand the cultural dynamics of the Bible. They identify nine key areas where modern Westerners have significantly different assumptions about what might be going on in a text. Drawing on their own cross cultural experience in global mission, O'Brien and Richards show how better self-awareness and understanding of cultural differences in language, time, and social mores allow us to see the Bible in fresh and unexpected ways. Getting beyond our own cultural assumptions is increasingly important for being Christians in our interconnected and globalized world. Learn to read Scripture as a member of the global body of Christ.

©2012 E. Randolph Richards and Brandon J. O'Brien (P)2014 Audible, Inc.

Narrator: Allan Robertson
Length: 8 hrs and 43 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Silk Road

The Silk Road

2 ratings

Summary

The Silk Road is as iconic in world history as the Colossus of Rhodes or the Suez Canal. But what was it, exactly? It conjures up a hazy image of a caravan of camels laden with silk on a dusty desert track reaching from China to Rome. The reality was different - and far more interesting - as revealed in this new history.   In The Silk Road, Valerie Hansen describes the remarkable archaeological finds that revolutionize our understanding of these trade routes. For centuries, key records remained hidden - sometimes deliberately buried by bureaucrats for safe keeping. But the sands of the Taklamakan Desert have revealed fascinating material, sometimes preserved by illiterate locals who recycled official documents to make insoles for shoes or garments for the dead.  Hansen explores seven oases along the road, from Xi'an to Samarkand, where merchants, envoys, pilgrims, and travelers mixed in cosmopolitan communities, tolerant of religions from Buddhism to Zoroastrianism.  There was no single, continuous road, but a chain of markets that traded between East and West. China and the Roman Empire had very little direct trade. China's main partners were the people of modern-day Iran, whose tombs in China reveal much about their Zoroastrian beliefs.  Silk was not the most important good on the road; paper, invented in China before Julius Caesar was born, had a bigger impact in Europe, while metals, spices, and glass were just as important as silk. Perhaps most significant of all was the road's transmission of ideas, technologies, and artistic motifs.   The Silk Road is a fascinating story of archaeological discovery, cultural transmission, and the intricate chains across Central Asia and China.

©2012 Valerie Hansen (P)2018 Tantor

Narrator: Jo Anna Perrin
Length: 9 hrs and 54 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Culture of Military Organizations

The Culture of Military Organizations

Summary

Culture has an enormous influence on military organizations and their success or failure in war. Cultural biases often result in unstated assumptions that have a deep impact on the making of strategy, operational planning, doctrinal creation, and the organization and training of armed forces. Except in unique circumstances, culture grows slowly, embedding so deeply that members often act unconsciously according to its dictates. Of all the factors that are involved in military effectiveness, culture is perhaps the most important. Yet, it also remains the most difficult to describe and understand, because it entails so many external factors that impinge, warp, and distort its formation and continuities.  The 16 case studies in this volume examine the culture of armies, navies, and air forces from the Civil War to the Iraq War and how and why culture affected their performance in the ultimate arbitration of war.

©2019 Cambridge University Press (P)2021 Tantor

Narrator: Tom Parks
Length: 22 hrs and 4 mins
Available on Audible
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Atlantic

7 ratings

Summary

From best-selling author Simon Winchester comes the immense and thrilling story of the world's most mysterious and breathtaking natural wonder: the Atlantic Ocean. Atlantic is a biography of a tremendous space that has been central to the ambitions of explorers, scientists, and warriors, and continues to affect profoundly our character, attitudes, and dreams. Spanning the ocean's story, from its geological origins to the age of exploration, from World War II battles to today's struggles with pollution and over-fishing, Winchester's narrative is epic, intimate, and awe inspiring. Until a thousand years ago, few humans ventured into the Atlantic or imagined traversing its vast infinity. But once the first daring mariners successfully navigated to its far shores - whether they were Vikings, the Irish, the Basques, John Cabot, or Christopher Columbus in the north, or the Portuguese and the Spanish in the south - the Atlantic swiftly evolved in the world's growing consciousness of itself as an enclosed body of water. Soon it became the fulcrum of Western civilization. More than a mere history, Atlantic is an unforgettable journey of unprecedented scope by one of the most gifted writers in the English language.

©2010 Simon Winchester (P)2010 HarperCollins Publishers

Length: 14 hrs and 30 mins
Available on Audible
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Identified Flying Objects

2 ratings

Summary

Could “UFOs” and “aliens” simply be us, but from the future? This provocative new audiobook cautiously examines the premise that extraterrestrials may instead be our distant human descendants, using the anthropological tool of time travel to visit and study us in their own hominin evolutionary past.  Dr. Michael P. Masters, a professor of biological anthropology specializing in human evolutionary anatomy, archaeology, and biomedicine, explores how the persistence of long-term biological and cultural trends in human evolution may ultimately result in us becoming the ones piloting these disc-shaped craft, which are likely the very devices that allow our future progeny to venture backward across the landscape of time. Moreover, these extratempestrials are ubiquitously described as bipedal, large-brained, hairless, human-like beings who communicate with us in our own languages and who possess technology advanced beyond, but clearly built upon, our own.  These accounts, coupled with a thorough understanding of the past and modern human condition, point to the continuation of established biological and cultural trends here on Earth, long into the distant human future. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.

©2019 Dr. Michael P. Masters (P)2019 Dr. Michael P. Masters

Length: 10 hrs and 45 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for A Macat Analysis of James Ferguson's The Anti-Politics Machine: "Development," Depoliticization, and Bureaucratic Power in Lesotho

A Macat Analysis of James Ferguson's The Anti-Politics Machine: "Development," Depoliticization, and Bureaucratic Power in Lesotho

Summary

Published in 1990, The Anti-Politics Machine is American anthropologist James Ferguson's first book. It discusses international development projects: how they are conceived, researched, and put into practice. Importantly, it also looks at what these projects actually achieve. Ferguson is critical of the idea of development and argues that the process does not take enough account of the daily realities of the communities it is intended to benefit. The projects put too much emphasis on providing technical solutions for addressing poverty, such as better resources or improved infrastructure. But these solutions often ignore the fact that there are social and political dimensions to poverty. So the structures that development projects put in place can often have unintended consequences for their target community, such as strengthening the state power that allowed the projects to get underway in the first place. Ferguson argues that these problems start in the planning stages of a development project as a result of the information gathered and the very language used to discuss it. Ferguson's work suggests that until the process becomes less formulaic and more reflective, development projects will continue to fail.

©2016 Macat Inc (P)2016 Macat Inc

Narrator: Macat.com
Author: Macat.com
Length: 1 hr and 57 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for This Is Your Brain on Parasites

This Is Your Brain on Parasites

9 ratings

Summary

A riveting investigation of the myriad ways that parasites control how other creatures - including humans - think, feel, and act. These tiny organisms can live only inside another animal, and, as McAuliffe reveals, they have many evolutionary motives for manipulating their host's behavior. Far more often than appreciated, these puppeteers orchestrate the interplay between predator and prey. With astonishing precision, parasites can coax rats to approach cats, spiders to transform the patterns of their webs, and fish to draw the attention of birds that then swoop down to feast on them. We humans are hardly immune to the profound influence of parasites. Organisms we pick up from our own pets are strongly suspected of changing our personality traits and contributing to recklessness, impulsivity - even suicide. Microbes in our gut affect our emotions and the very wiring of our brains. Germs that cause colds and flu may alter our behavior even before symptoms become apparent. Parasites influence our species on the cultural level, too. As McAuliffe documents, a subconscious fear of contagion impacts virtually every aspect of our lives, from our sexual attractions and social circles to our morals and political views. Drawing on a huge body of research, she argues that our dread of contamination is an evolved defense against parasites - and a double-edged sword. The horror and revulsion we feel when we come in contact with people who appear diseased or dirty helped pave the way for civilization but may also be the basis for major divisions in societies that persist to this day. In the tradition of Jared Diamond's Guns, Germs, and Steel and Neil Shubin's Your Inner Fish, This Is Your Brain on Parasites is both a journey into cutting-edge science and a revelatory examination of what it means to be human.

©2016 Kathleen McAuliffe (P)2016 Audible, Inc.

Length: 8 hrs and 20 mins
Available on Audible
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Eat Like the Animals

Summary

A New Scientist Best Book of 2020 Our evolutionary ancestors once possessed the ability to intuit what food their bodies needed, in what proportions, and ate the right things in the proper amounts - perfect nutritional harmony. From wild baboons to gooey slime molds, most every living organism instinctually knows how to balance their diets, except modern-day humans. When and why did we lose this ability, and how can we get it back? David Raubenheimer and Stephen Simpson reveal the answers to these questions in a gripping tale of evolutionary biology and nutritional science, based upon years of groundbreaking research. Their colorful scientific journey takes readers across the globe, from the foothills of Cape Town, to the deserts of Arizona, to a state-of-the-art research center in Sydney. Readers will encounter locusts, mice and even gorillas along the way as the scientists test their hypotheses on various members of the animal kingdom. This epic scientific adventure culminates in a unifying theory of nutrition that has profound implications for our current epidemic of metabolic diseases and obesity. Raubenheimer and Simpson ultimately offer useful advice to understand the unwanted side effects of fad diets, gain control over one’s food environment, and see that delicious and healthy are integral parts of proper eating.

©2020 David Raubenheimer and Stephen Simpson (P)2020 HarperCollins Publishers

Available on Audible
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Our Inner Ape

5 ratings

Summary

We have long attributed man's violent, aggressive, competitive nature to his animal ancestry. But what if we are just as given to cooperation, empathy, and morality by virtue of our genes? What if our behavior actually makes us apes? What kind of apes are we? From a scientist and writer E.O. Wilson has called "the world authority on primate social behavior" comes a fascinating look at the most provocative aspects of human nature: power, sex, violence, kindness, and morality, through our two closest cousins in the ape family. For nearly 20 years, Frans de Waal has worked with both the famously aggressive chimpanzee and the lesser-known, egalitarian, erotic, matriarchal bonobo, two species whose DNA is nearly identical to that of humans. De Waal shows the range of human behavior through his study of chimpanzees and bonobos, drawing from their personalities, relationships, power struggles, and hijinx important insights about our human behavior. The result is an engrossing and surprising narrative that reveals what their behavior can teach us about our own nature.

©2005 Frans de Waal (P)2005 Tantor Media, Inc.

Narrator: Alan Sklar
Length: 10 hrs and 14 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Book of Humans

The Book of Humans

9 ratings

Summary

The best-selling author of A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived investigates what it means to be human - and animal.  Evolutionary theory has long established that humans are animals: Modern Homo sapiens are primates who share an ancestor with monkeys and other great apes. Our genome is 98 percent identical to a chimpanzee's. And yet we think of ourselves as exceptional. Are we?  In this original and entertaining tour of life on Earth, Adam Rutherford explores the profound paradox of the "human animal". Looking for answers across the animal kingdom, he finds that many things once considered exclusively human are not: In Australia, raptors have been observed starting fires to scatter prey; in Zambia, a chimp named Julie even started a "fashion" of wearing grass in one ear. We aren't the only species that communicates, makes tools, or has sex for reasons other than procreation. But we have developed a culture far more complex than any other we've observed. Why has that happened, and what does it say about us?  The Book of Humans is a new evolutionary history - a synthesis of the latest research on genetics, sex, migration, and much more. It reveals what unequivocally makes us animals - and also why we are truly extraordinary.  PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio. 

©2019 Adam Rutherford (P)2019 Tantor

Narrator: Adam Rutherford
Length: 5 hrs and 48 mins
Available on Audible
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A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived

73 ratings

Summary

A National Geographic Best Book of the Year   In our unique genomes, every one of us carries the story of our species - births, deaths, disease, war, famine, migration, and a lot of sex.  But those stories have always been locked away - until now.  Who are our ancestors? Where did they come from? Geneticists have suddenly become historians, and the hard evidence in our DNA has completely upended what we thought we knew about ourselves. Acclaimed science writer Adam Rutherford explains exactly how genomics is completely rewriting the human story - from 100,000 years ago to the present. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio. 

©2016 Adam Rutherford (P)2018 Tantor

Narrator: Adam Rutherford
Length: 12 hrs and 13 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Die Gesetze der menschlichen Natur - The Laws of Human Nature

Die Gesetze der menschlichen Natur - The Laws of Human Nature

Summary

Robert Greene versteht es auf meisterhafte Weise, Weisheit und Philosophie der alten Denker für Millionen von Lesern auf der Suche nach Wissen, Macht und Selbstvervollkommnung zugänglich zu machen. In seinem neuen Buch ist er dem wichtigsten Thema überhaupt auf der Spur: Der Entschlüsselung menschlicher Antriebe und Motivationen, auch derer, die uns selbst nicht bewusst sind. Der Mensch ist ein Gesellschaftstier. Sein Leben hängt von der Beziehung zu Seinesgleichen ab. Zu wissen, warum wir tun, was wir tun, gibt uns ein weit wirksameres Werkzeug an die Hand als all unsere Talente es könnten. Ausgehend von den Ideen und Beispielen von Perikles, Queen Elizabeth I, Martin Luther King Jr und vielen anderen zeigt Greene, wie wir einerseits von unseren eigenen Emotionen unabhängig werden und Selbstbeherrschung lernen und andererseits Empathie anderen gegenüber entwickeln können, um hinter ihre Masken zu blicken. Die Gesetze der menschlichen Natur bietet dem Leser nicht zuletzt einzigartige Strategien, um im professionellen und privaten Bereich eigene Ziele zu erreichen und zu verteidigen. >> Diese ungekürzte Hörbuch-Fassung genießt du digital exklusiv nur bei Audible.

©2019 FinanzBuch Verlag, ein Imprint der Münchner Verlagsgruppe GmbH (P)2020 FinanzBuch Verlag, ein Imprint der Münchner Verlagsgruppe GmbH

Narrator: Markus Böker
Length: 34 hrs and 27 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Basque History of the World

Basque History of the World

Summary

Award-winning author Mark Kurlansky has drawn enthusiastic praise for his books, which are sharply-focused studies as well as glorious celebrations of their subjects. In The Basque History of the World, he turns his eye toward Europe’s oldest surviving culture - a culture as mysterious as it is fascinating. Settled in the western Pyrenees Mountains of France and Spain, the Basque nation is not drawn on maps, and the origin of their forbidden language has never been discovered. Yet Basques appear to predate all other cultures in Europe, with many significant global contributions to their credit. Most notably, one of their own took command after Magellan’s death and was the first person to circumnavigate the globe. This informative book is full of lively anecdotes that illuminate an otherwise obscure culture. Narrator George Guidall rises to the challenge of the text, which includes many Basque terms, and interprets beautifully.

©1999 Mark Kurlansky (P)2000 Recorded Books, LLC

Narrator: George Guidall
Length: 12 hrs and 44 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Intelligence in Nature

Intelligence in Nature

14 ratings

Summary

Anthropologist Jeremy Narby has altered how we understand the Shamanic cultures and traditions that have undergone a worldwide revival in recent years. Now, in one of his most extraordinary journeys, Narby travels the globe - from the Amazon Basin to the Far East - to probe what traditional healers and pioneering researchers understand about the intelligence present in all forms of life. Intelligence in Nature presents overwhelming illustrative evidence that independent intelligence is not unique to humanity alone. Indeed, bacteria, plants, animals, and other forms of nonhuman life display an uncanny penchant for self-deterministic decisions, patterns, and actions. Narby presents the first in-depth anthropological study of this concept in the West. He not only uncovers a mysterious thread of intelligent behavior within the natural world but also probes the question of what humanity can learn from nature's economy and knowingness in its own search for a saner and more sustainable way of life.

©2005 Jeremy Narby (P)2017 Tantor

Author: Jeremy Narby
Length: 4 hrs and 29 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Why Is the Penis Shaped Like That?

Why Is the Penis Shaped Like That?

2 ratings

Summary

Why do testicles hang the way they do? Is there an adaptive function to the female orgasm? What does it feel like to want to kill yourself? Does “free will” really exist? And why is the penis shaped like that anyway? In Why Is the Penis Shaped Like That?, the research psychologist and award-winning columnist Jesse Bering features more than thirty of his most popular essays from Scientific American and Slate, as well as two new pieces, that take readers on a bold and captivating journey through some of the most taboo issues related to evolution and human behavior. Exploring the history of cannibalism, the neurology of people who are sexually attracted to animals, the evolution of human body fluids, the science of homosexuality, and serious questions about life and death, Bering astutely covers a generous expanse of our kaleidoscope of quirks and origins. With his characteristic irreverence and trademark cheekiness, Bering leaves no topic unturned or curiosity unexamined, and he does it all with an audaciously original voice. Whether you’re interested in the psychological history behind the many facets of sexual desire or the evolutionary patterns that have dictated our current mystique and phallic physique, Why Is the Penis Shaped Like That? is bound to create lively discussion and debate for years to come.

©2012 Jesse Bering (P)2012 Macmillan Audio

Narrator: Jesse Bering
Author: Jesse Bering
Length: 6 hrs and 57 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Darkest England

Darkest England

1 rating

Summary

In his best-selling Darkest England, Idries Shah asserts that the English hail from a little-known place called "Hathaby", but their roots go back much farther, perhaps to the distant Asian realm of Sakasina. Once a nomadic tribe of warriors, the English fled westward, bringing with them epic tales, traditions, and an Oriental way of thought. Shah charts the genius of the English in adopting and adapting "almost anything spiritual, moral or material" for their own use - a faculty that has transformed them from warrior nomads into successful diplomats, businessmen, thinkers, and scientists.

©1987 The Estate of Idries Shah (P)2020 ISF Publishing

Narrator: David Ault
Author: Idries Shah
Length: 13 hrs and 24 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Monique and the Mango Rains

Monique and the Mango Rains

1 rating

Summary

What is it like to live and work in a remote corner of the world and befriend a courageous midwife who breaks traditional roles? Monique and the Mango Rains: Two Years with a Mali Midwife is the inspiring story of Monique Dembele, an accidental midwife who became a legend, and Kris Holloway, the young Peace Corps volunteer who became her closest confidante. In a small village in Mali, West Africa, Monique saved lives and dispensed hope every day in a place where childbirth is a life-and-death matter and where many children are buried before they cut a tooth. Kris worked side-by-side with her as they cared for each other through sickness and tragedy and shared their innermost secrets and hopes. Monique's life was representative of many women in one of the world's poorest nations, yet she faced her challenges in extraordinary ways. Despite her fiercely traditional society and her limited education she fought for her beliefs birth control, the end of female genital mutilation, the right to receive a salary, and the right to educate her daughters. And she struggled to be with the man she loved. Her story is one of tragedy joy, rebellion, and of an ancient culture in the midst of change. It is an uplifting tribute to indomitable spirits everywhere.

©2007 Kris Holloway (P)2018 Tantor

Narrator: Kirsten Potter
Length: 8 hrs and 24 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Life

Life

2 ratings

Summary

Scientists' understanding of life is progressing more rapidly than at any point in human history, from the extraordinary decoding of DNA to the controversial emergence of biotechnology. Featuring pioneering biologists, geneticists, physicists, and science writers, Life explains just how far we've come - and takes a brilliantly educated guess at where we're heading. Richard Dawkins and J. Craig Venter compare genes to digital information and sketch the frontiers of genomic research. Edward O. Wilson reveals what ants can teach us about building a superorganism - and, in turn, about how cells build an organism. Elsewhere, David Haig reports new findings on how mothers and fathers individually influence the human genome while Kary Mullis covers cutting-edge treatments for dangerous viruses. And there's much more in this fascinating volume. We may never have all the answers. But the thinkers collected in Life are asking questions that will keep us dreaming for generations.

©2016 John Brockman (P)2016 Tantor

Length: 12 hrs and 37 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Life in a Medieval Village

Life in a Medieval Village

2 ratings

Summary

Life in a Medieval Village, by respected historians Joseph and Frances Gies, paints a lively, convincing portrait of rural people at work and at play in the Middle Ages. Focusing on the village of Elton, in the English East Midlands, the Gieses detail the agricultural advances that made communal living possible, explain what domestic life was like for serf and lord alike, and describe the central role of the church in maintaining social harmony. Though the main focus is on Elton, c. 1300, the Gieses supply enlightening historical context on the origin, development, and decline of the European village, itself an invention of the Middle Ages. Meticulously researched, Life in a Medieval Village is a remarkable account that illustrates the captivating world of the Middle Ages and demonstrates what it was like to live during a fascinating - and often misunderstood - era.

©1990 Frances and Joseph Gies (P)2017 Tantor

Narrator: Anne Flosnik
Length: 6 hrs and 46 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Running with the Kenyans

Running with the Kenyans

6 ratings

Summary

After years of watching Kenyan athletes win the world's biggest races, Adharanand Finn set out to discover just what it was that made them so fast - and to see if he could keep up. Packing up his life he moved from Devon to Iten, in Kenya, to eat with, interview, sleep beside and - most importantly – run with, some of the greatest runners in the world. In the distance rests his dream, to join the best of the Kenyan athletes in an epic first marathon across the Kenyan plains.

©2012 Adharanand Finn (P)2012 W F Howes Ltd

Narrator: Paul Tyreman
Length: 8 hrs and 38 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The History of Rome, Volume 2: Books 6 - 10

The History of Rome, Volume 2: Books 6 - 10

5 ratings

Summary

Livy continues his magnificent epic, with Rome in complete ruin after the Gallic invasion and sack of the city in 310 B.C. Led by Camillus, one of Rome's great heroic patricians, the city regains her self-confidence and once more becomes the leader of the Latin people. Painstakingly rebuilding alliances, forging friendships, cementing relations among her own people, and fighting endless wars, Rome soon becomes the dominant power among the fractious Italic tribes on the Latin plain. For 50 years, the Romans maintain political and economic stability while pursuing an aggressive stance toward the other, more distant, warlike Italic peoples. Rome is under constant threat of invasion from many quarters and her disciplined soldiers are kept in perfect training. And they need to be. After many decades, the Romans finally manage to conquer the Etruscans and the mighty Samnites, at last bringing most of the Italian peninsula under their control. Livy's The History of Rome continues in an additional four volumes.

Public Domain (P)2010 Audio Connoisseur

Author: Titus Livy
Length: 14 hrs and 1 min
Available on Audible
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Present Shock

Summary

"If the end of the twentieth century can be characterized by futurism, the twenty-first can be defined by presentism." This is the moment we’ve been waiting for, explains award-winning media theorist Douglas Rushkoff, but we don’t seem to have any time in which to live it. Instead we remain poised and frozen, overwhelmed by an always-on, live-streamed reality that our human bodies and minds can never truly inhabit. And our failure to do so has had wide-ranging effects on every aspect of our lives. People spent the twentieth century obsessed with the future. We created technologies that would help connect us faster, gather news, map the planet, compile knowledge, and connect with anyone, at any time. We strove for an instantaneous network where time and space could be compressed. Well, the future’s arrived. We live in a continuous now enabled by Twitter, email, and a so-called real-time technological shift. Yet this “now” is an elusive goal that we can never quite reach. And the dissonance between our digital selves and our analog bodies has thrown us into a new state of anxiety: present shock. Rushkoff weaves together seemingly disparate events and trends into a rich, nuanced portrait of how life in the eternal present has affected our biology, behavior, politics, and culture. He explains how the rise of zombie apocalypse fiction signals our intense desire for an ending; how the Tea Party and Occupy Wall Street form two sides of the same post-narrative coin; how corporate investing in the future has been replaced by futile efforts to game the stock market in real time; why social networks make people anxious and email can feel like an assault. He examines how the tragedy of 9/11 disconnected an entire generation from a sense of history, and delves into why conspiracy theories actually comfort us. As both individuals and communities, we have a choice. We can struggle through the onslaught of information and play an eternal game of catch-up. Or we can choose to live in the present: favor eye contact over texting; quality over speed; and human quirks over digital perfection. Rushkoff offers hope for anyone seeking to transcend the false now. Absorbing and thought-provoking, Present Shock is a wide-ranging, deep thought meditation on what it means to be human in real time.

©2013 Douglas Rushkoff (P)2013 Audible Inc.

Length: 11 hrs
Available on Audible
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Millenial Depression

Summary

At the heart of the nation, the Millennials will soon be in control of our future. The entire working class, judges, law enforcement, politicians, and decision-makers will be at the head of everything. One day soon, Millennials will be deciding our fates and where we go from here.  Unfortunately, Millennials will be faced with problems and hurdles that other generations have not had to deal with. Millennials will be in a unique position to fail, as it were. This generation, and to no fault of their own, must overcome depression, addiction, and must find a purpose that holds meaning in their lives.  Millennials are not satisfied with having a job and just getting by; they must find meaning in what they are doing on the daily. Many millennials have been over-parented and coddled to the extent that an entire generation will be negatively affected. This generation as children were helped too much as their parents just wanted a better life for their children, but what parent doesn’t?  Not all parents were “helicopter” parents and always hovering over their child. There were plenty of parents that were just not there emotionally or were unavailable to Millennials. Experts think there are many negative effects that are now surfacing with current statistics.  Are Millennials going to have children of their own someday? Will they be able to make it through a typical nine to five job? Are suburbs and the suburbia life coming to end?  How does an entire generation find meaning in their work and life? How does a whole generation fend for themselves without being taught the skills to be successful and prosper independently?  What will the future look and be like when Millennials take the helm of the ship of life? Find all of the answers in this audiobook.  Millennial depression and addiction The experts say that Millennial depression and addiction are increasingly worse off than other generations. The “Baby Boomers”, or the parents of Millennials, are faced with a dilemma. The fact is that the Baby Boomer generation were born in 1946-1964. During this time, the parents of Millennials were affected by the world around them.  World War 2 ended; millions of Americans came home. These returning men from war led to a spike in marriages and babies. Imagine coming home after war and facing death day after day. Once these men returned, they were excited to be alive and move on with what was important in their lives, love, marriage, kids, and a thankfulness to be alive.  The Baby Boomers were a generation surrounded by fear and anxiety.... Download now to hear more.

©2020 J.J. Stone (P)2020 J.J. Stone

Narrator: Ann Bumbak
Author: J.J. Stone
Length: 21 mins
Available on Audible
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A History of the Human Brain

Summary

Just over 125,000 years ago, humanity was going extinct until a dramatic shift occurred - Homo sapiens started tracking the tides in order to eat the nearby oysters. Before long, they’d pulled themselves back from the brink of extinction. What saved us during that period of endangerment? The human brain, and its evolutionary journey is unlike anything else in history.  In A History of the Human Brain, Bret Stetka takes listeners through that far-reaching journey, showing exactly when and how the human brain evolved to shape who we are today. A History of the Human Brain also tackles the question of where the brain will take us next, exploring the burgeoning concepts of epigenetics and new technologies like CRISPR.

©2021 Bret Stetka (P)2021 Workman Publishing

Narrator: Sean Pratt
Author: Bret Stetka
Length: 7 hrs and 54 mins
Available on Audible
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How Do We Look

Summary

From prehistoric Mexico to modern Istanbul, Mary Beard looks beyond the familiar canon of Western imagery to explore the history of art, religion, and humanity. Conceived as an accompaniment to How Do We Look and The Eye of Faith, the famed Civilizations shows on PBS, renowned classicist Mary Beard has created this elegant volume on how we have looked at art. Focusing in Part I on the Olmec heads of early Mesoamerica, the colossal statues of the pharaoh Amenhotep III, and the nudes of classical Greece, Beard explores the power, hierarchy, and gender politics of the art of the ancient world, and explains how it came to define the so-called civilized world. In Part II, Beard chronicles some of the most breathtaking religious imagery ever made - whether at Angkor Wat, Ravenna, Venice, or in the art of Jewish and Islamic calligraphers - to show how all religions, ancient and modern, have faced irreconcilable problems in trying to picture the divine. With this classic volume, Beard redefines the Western- and male-centric legacies of Ernst Gombrich and Kenneth Clark.

©2018 Mary Beard (P)2018 Profile Audio

Narrator: Mary Beard
Author: Mary Beard
Length: 2 hrs and 51 mins
Available on Audible
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Playing God

Summary

With Playing God, Andy Crouch opens the subject of power, elucidating its subtle activity in our E1:AO3 and institutions. He gives us much more than a warning against abuse, though. Turning the notion of "playing God" on its head, Crouch celebrates power as the gift by which we join in God's creative, redeeming work in the world. An essential book for all who would influence their world for the good.

©2015 eChristian (P)2015 eChristian

Author: Andy Crouch
Length: 10 hrs and 39 mins
Available on Audible
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Becoming Human

Summary

A radical reconsideration of how we develop the qualities that make us human, based on decades of cutting-edge experimental work by the former director of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology.   Virtually all theories of how humans have become such a distinctive species focus on evolution. Here, Michael Tomasello proposes a complementary theory of human uniqueness, focused on development. Building on the seminal ideas of Vygotsky, his data-driven model explains how those things that make us most human are constructed during the first years of a child's life.   Tomasello assembles nearly three decades of experimental work with chimpanzees, bonobos, and human children to propose a new framework for psychological growth between birth and seven years of age. He identifies eight pathways that starkly differentiate humans from their closest primate relatives: social cognition, communication, cultural learning, cooperative thinking, collaboration, prosociality, social norms, and moral identity.    Becoming Human places human sociocultural activity within the framework of modern evolutionary theory and shows how biology creates the conditions under which culture does its work.

©2019 The President and Fellows of Harvard College (P)2018 Tantor

Length: 12 hrs and 43 mins
Available on Audible
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The Complete Works of Tacitus: Volume 4

1 rating

Summary

The exemplary life of a noble soldier/statesman, a description of ancient Germany, and a discussion of oratory are the subjects of three short masterpieces by the brilliant Roman historian, Tacitus. The Life of Cnaeus Julius Agricola is an almost perfect example of what the Romans called the panegyric, a type of salutary obituary which was invariably produced at the death of renowned persons. Agricola was certainly no ordinary man. For one thing, he was the father-in-law of Tacitus. And for another, he was a genuinely gifted soldier of the highest character, the kind of unsung hero who made possible the success of Roman civilization. Germany and Its Tribes is one of the most interesting pieces to come down to us. It is a very insightful and informed commentary on the feared tribes who lived beyond the Rhine. Although some of the information is incorrect or nonsensical, most of it is quite cogent and represents an accurate picture of the German people in those days. Many will recognize traits that have survived into modern times. The Dialogue on Oratory is a spirited discussion among four men about the merits or demerits of the state of oratory in their time versus its practice in the past. By turns amusing and dazzling, the conversation keeps the listener entertained. This production uses the famous translation by Church and Brodribb, considered the finest in the English language.

©2006 Audio Connoisseur (P)2006 Audio Connoisseur

Length: 4 hrs and 13 mins
Available on Audible
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The Old Way

1 rating

Summary

One of our most influential anthropologists reevaluates her long and illustrious career by returning to her roots ? and the roots of life as we know it. When Elizabeth Marshall Thomas first arrived in Africa to live among the Kalahari San, or bushmen, it was 1950, she was 19 years old, and these last surviving hunter-gatherers were living as humans had lived for 15,000 centuries. Thomas wound up writing about their world in a seminal work, The Harmless People. It has never gone out of print. Back then, this was uncharted territory, and little was known about our human origins. Today, our beginnings are better understood. And after a lifetime of interest in the bushmen, Thomas has come to see that their lifestyle reveals great, hidden truths about human evolution. As she displayed in her best seller, The Hidden Life of Dogs, Thomas has a rare gift for giving voice to the voices we don't usually listen to. She helps us see the path that we have taken in our human journey. In The Old Way, she shows how the skills and customs of the hunter-gatherer share much in common with the survival tactics of our animal predecessors. And since it is "knowledge, not objects, that endure" over time, Thomas vividly brings us to see how linked we are to our origins in the animal kingdom. The Old Way is a rare and remarkable achievement, sure to stir up controversy, and is worthy of celebration.

©2006 Elizabeth Marshall Thomas (P)2006 Tantor Media, Inc.

Length: 11 hrs and 23 mins
Available on Audible
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The Civil War

Summary

For a person seeking a single volume to serve as a captivating introduction and a dependable guide through all the maze of battles and issues of the Civil War, this is an audiobook without parallel. Bruce Catton understood the Civil War - its participants and battles - and he unfolds it with skill and simplicity. Of all historians past and present, Bruce Catton ranks among the best.

©1960 by American Heritage, Inc. (P)1991 by Blackstone Audiobooks

Author: Bruce Catton
Length: 7 hrs and 59 mins
Available on Audible
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The Cabin in the Mountains

Summary

Turf-roofed and wooden-built, offering fresh clean air, peace, isolation and the promise of a day's wood-chopping, hiking or snow-clearing amid landscapes of great beauty, the hytte - or wooden cabin home - is a crucial part of the national identity of every Norwegian. In 2016, Robert Ferguson and his wife bought a piece of land high up in the Hardangervidda, the plateau that dominates south-central Norway, and on it they built such a hytte. For Ferguson, the hytte represented the realisation of a dream that first brought him to Norway from England more than 30 years ago. As the cabin takes shape he learns, through conversations with friends and cabin builders, the cultural history of modern Norway. He learns of the changing traditions attached to these cabin homes for native Norwegians as they try to marry their newfound urban affluence to their past as a tight-knit, impoverished rural community-nation. Along the way he also describes the intense and mutually rewarding relationship that arose between the colonial Norwegians and their wealthy, imperialist British neighbours across the North Sea in the 19th and 20th centuries; how the British 'salmon-lords' showed them another way of looking at their great rivers, and how English climbers introduced them to a new way of thinking about their mountains. 

©2019 Robert Ferguson (P)2019 Head of Zeus

Narrator: Nicholas Camm
Length: 8 hrs and 44 mins
Available on Audible
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Nobody's Normal

3 ratings

Summary

A compassionate and captivating examination of evolving attitudes toward mental illness throughout history and the fight to end the stigma. For centuries, scientists and society cast moral judgments on anyone deemed mentally ill, confining many to asylums. In Nobody’s Normal, anthropologist Roy Richard Grinker chronicles the progress and setbacks in the struggle against mental-illness stigma - from the 18th century, through America’s major wars, and into today’s high-tech economy. Nobody’s Normal argues that stigma is a social process that can be explained through cultural history, a process that began the moment we defined mental illness, that we learn from within our communities, and that we ultimately have the power to change. Though the legacies of shame and secrecy are still with us today, Grinker writes that we are at the cusp of ending the marginalization of the mentally ill. In the 21st century, mental illnesses are fast becoming a more accepted and visible part of human diversity. Grinker infuses the book with the personal history of his family’s four generations of involvement in psychiatry, including his grandfather’s analysis with Sigmund Freud, his own daughter’s experience with autism, and culminating in his research on neurodiversity. Drawing on cutting-edge science, historical archives, and cross-cultural research in Africa and Asia, Grinker takes listeners on an international journey to discover the origins of, and variances in, our cultural response to neurodiversity. Urgent, eye-opening, and ultimately hopeful, Nobody’s Normal explains how we are transforming mental illness and offers a path to end the shadow of stigma.

©2021 Roy Richard Grinker (P)2021 Random House Audio

Narrator: Lyle Blaker
Length: 14 hrs and 30 mins
Available on Audible
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Nudge (German edition)

Summary

Nudge - so heißt die Formel, mit der man andere dazu bewegt, die richtigen Entscheidungen zu treffen. Denn Menschen verhalten sich von Natur aus nicht rational. Nur mit einer Portion List können sie dazu gebracht werden, vernünftig zu handeln. Aber wie schafft man das, ohne sie zu bevormunden? Wie erreicht man zum Beispiel, dass sie sich um ihre Altervorsorge kümmern, umweltbewusst leben oder sich gesund ernähren? Darauf gibt Nudge die Antwort. Das Konzept hat bereits viele Entscheidungsträger überzeugt, darunter US-Präsident Barack Obama. Anschaulich und unterhaltsam präsentieren der Wirtschaftsnobelpreisträger Richard Thaler und Cass Sunstein einen neuen Ansatz der Verhaltensökonomie, der schon heute das Denken und Handeln in Politik und Wirtschaft prägt.

©2009 Ullstein Buchverlage GmbH (P)2019 Audio Verlag München

Narrator: Peter Wolter
Length: 10 hrs and 16 mins
Available on Audible
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The Geography of Genius

2 ratings

Summary

Travel the world with Eric Weiner, the New York Times best-selling author of The Geography of Bliss, as he journeys from Athens to Silicon Valley - and throughout history, too - to show how creative genius flourishes in specific places at specific times. In The Geography of Genius, acclaimed travel writer Weiner sets out to examine the connection between our surroundings and our most innovative ideas. He explores the history of places, like Vienna of 1900, Renaissance Florence, ancient Athens, Song Dynasty Hangzhou, and Silicon Valley, to show how certain urban settings are conducive to ingenuity. And, with his trademark insightful humor, he walks the same paths as the geniuses who flourished in these settings to see if the spirit of what inspired figures like Socrates, Michelangelo, and Leonardo remains. In these places, Weiner asks, "What was in the air, and can we bottle it?" This link can be traced back through history: Darwin's theory of evolution gelled while he was riding in a carriage. Freud did his best thinking at his favorite coffeehouse. Beethoven, like many geniuses, preferred long walks in the woods. Sharp and provocative, The Geography of Genius redefines the argument about how genius came to be. His reevaluation of the importance of culture in nurturing creativity is an informed romp through history that will surely jump-start a national conversation.

©2016 Eric Weiner (P)2016 Simon & Schuster

Narrator: Eric Weiner
Author: Eric Weiner
Length: 14 hrs and 10 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for La vida contada por un sapiens a un neandertal [Life Told by a Sapiens to a Neanderthal]

La vida contada por un sapiens a un neandertal [Life Told by a Sapiens to a Neanderthal]

Summary

El ingenio de Millás y la sabiduría de Arsuaga unidos para contar la vida como la mejor de las historias. "Tú y yo podríamos asociarnos para hablar de la vida; levantaríamos un gran relato sobre la existencia. ¿Lo hacemos?" dijo el escritor. "Lo hacemos." contestó el paleontólogo. Hace años que el interés por entender la vida, sus orígenes y su evolución resuena en la cabeza de Juan José Millás, de manera que se dispuso a conocer, junto a uno de los mayores especialistas de este país en la materia, Juan Luis Arsuaga, por qué somos como somos y qué nos ha llevado hasta donde estamos. La sabiduría del paleontólogo se combina en este libro con el ingenio y la mirada personal y sorprendente que tiene el escritor sobre la realidad. Porque Millás es un neandertal (o eso dice), y Arsuaga, a sus ojos, un sapiens. Así, a lo largo de muchos meses, los dos visitaron distintos lugares, muchos de ellos escenarios comunes de nuestra vida cotidiana, y otros, emplazamientos únicos donde todavía se pueden ver los vestigios de lo que fuimos, del lugar del que venimos. En esas salidas, que al oyente pueden recordarle a las de don Quijote y Sancho, el sapiens trató de enseñar al neandertal cómo pensar como un sapiens y, sobre todo, que la prehistoria no es cosa del pasado: las huellas de la humanidad a través de los milenios se pueden encontrar en cualquier lugar, desde una cueva o un paisaje hasta un parque infantil o una tienda de peluches. Es la vida lo que late en este libro. La mejor de las historias. Please note: This audiobook is in Spanish.

©2020 Juan José Millás y Juan Luis Arsuaga (P)2020 Penguin Random House Grupo Editorial, S.A.U.

Length: 6 hrs and 44 mins
Available on Audible
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The Aztecs: A Very Short Introduction 

2 ratings

Summary

This Very Short Introduction employs the disciplines of history, religious studies, and anthropology as it illuminates the complexities of Aztec life. Readers meet a people highly skilled in sculpture, astronomy, city planning, poetry, and philosophy, who were also profoundly committed to cosmic regeneration through the thrust of the ceremonial knife and through warfare. Davíd Carrasco looks beyond Spanish accounts that have colored much of the Western narrative to let Aztec voices speak about their origin stories, the cosmic significance of their capital city, their methods of child rearing, and the contributions women made to daily life and the empire. Carrasco discusses the arrival of the Spaniards, contrasts Aztec mythical traditions about the origins of their city with actual urban life in Mesoamerica, and outlines the rise of the Aztec empire. He also explores Aztec religion, which provided both justification for and alternatives to warfare, sacrifice, and imperialism, and he sheds light on Aztec poetry, philosophy, painting, and especially monumental sculpture and architecture. He concludes by looking at how the Aztecs have been portrayed in Western thought, art, film, and literature as well as in Latino culture and arts.

©2012 Davíd Carrasco (P)2013 Audible, Inc.

Narrator: Ken Maxon
Length: 3 hrs and 52 mins
Available on Audible
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Addicted to Busy

1 rating

Summary

There's a ritual of the modern workplace - one you've heard and most likely indulged in yourself. It's the call and response we go through when you ask a workmate how they're doing: 'Busy!' 'So busy.' It is pretty obviously a boast disguised as a complaint. And our simultaneously grim and half chuckled reply comes as a kind of congratulation: 'Ha, better than the opposite.' When did we start doing that?  As if he didn't have enough to do, Oliver Burkeman explores this epidemic of busyness to reveal that it may not be what it at first seems. He asks if we are talking ourselves into feeling overwhelmed with busyness and if our problem with busyness is not that we do not have the time but rather we literally do not have the head space. He questions whether people have become addicted to busy, either because it makes them feel like heroes fighting the odds or because problems can be avoided by never sitting still.  Finally, he examines whether the solution to busyness is perhaps not to work harder and organise ourselves but to indulge in a little idleness. Oliver Burkeman is an award-winning feature writer for the Guardian. He writes a popular weekly column on psychology, ‘This Column Will Change Your Life’, and has reported from London, Washington and New York. Produced by Peter McManus.  This programme was broadcast on BBC Radio 4 as Oliver Burkeman Is Busy.

©2018 Oliver Burkeman (P)2018 Random House Audiobooks

Narrator: Oliver Burkeman
Length: 1 hr and 8 mins
Available on Audible
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Cocaine + Surfing

3 ratings

Summary

From the author of Welcome to Paradise, Now Go to Hell, a finalist for the PEN Center USA Award for Nonfiction It is likely not terribly surprising that surfers like to party. The 1960-'70s image, bolstered by Tom Wolfe and Big Wednesday, was one of mild outlaws. Tanned boys who refused to grow up, spending their days drinking beer and smoking joints on the beach in between mindless hours in the water. As the surf brands accidentally morphed into a multimillion- then multibillion-dollar industry beginning in the 1980s, however, the derelict portrait began to harm business. In order to achieve wild year-on-year growth that came to be expected, surf trunks, T-shirts and sunglasses had to be sold en masse through Midwestern mall stores. Moms in Des Moines did not want corn-fed junior to be a delinquent. And so the external surf image of the 1980s and '90s and into the present became Kelly Slater and Laird Hamilton. Health, vitality, bravery, clean living, positive, and pure, with heavy doses of puritanism. Internally, though, surfing had moved on from booze and weed to its heart's true home, its soul's twin flame. Cocaine's rise in American popular culture as the choice of rich, white elites was matched, then quadrupled, within surf culture. The parties got wilder, the nights stretched longer, the stories became more ridiculously unbelievable. And there has been no stopping, no dip in passion. The surfer and his lover are entwined in gorgeously dysfunctional embrace. A forbidden love like Romeo and his Juliet, and few, if any, outside the insular surf world knew or know about this particular rhapsody. A byzantine ethic keeps interlopers far away. Bad behavior is also kept very well hidden, even from insiders, but evidence of psychosis rears its head from time to time. Overdoses, bar fights, surf contests, and murders and cover-ups. Cocaine + Surfing peels the curtains back on a hopped up, sometimes sexy, sometimes deadly relationship and uses cocaine as the vehicle to expose and explain the utterly absurd surf industry to outsiders. It also explores where dreams go when they die.

©2018 Chas Smith (P)2018 Audible, Inc.

Narrator: Tom Pile
Author: Chas Smith
Length: 7 hrs and 19 mins
Available on Audible
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Domesticated

2 ratings

Summary

Without our domesticated plants and animals, human civilization as we know it would not exist. We would still be living at subsistence level as hunter-gatherers if not for domestication. It is no accident that the cradle of civilization - the Middle East - is where sheep, goats, pigs, cattle, and cats commenced their fatefully intimate associations with humans. Before the agricultural revolution, there were perhaps 10 million humans on Earth. Now there are more than seven billion of us. Our domesticated species have also thrived, in stark contrast to their wild ancestors. In a human-constructed environment - or manmade world - it pays to be domesticated. Domestication is an evolutionary process first and foremost. What most distinguishes domesticated animals from their wild ancestors are genetic alterations resulting in tameness, the capacity to tolerate close human proximity. But selection for tameness often results in a host of seemingly unrelated by-products, including floppy ears, skeletal alterations, reduced aggression, increased sociality, and reduced brain size. It's a package deal known as the domestication syndrome. Elements of the domestication syndrome can be found in every domesticated species - not only cats, dogs, pigs, sheep, cattle, and horses but also more recent human creations, such as domesticated camels, reindeer, and laboratory rats. That domestication results in this suite of changes in such a wide variety of mammals is a fascinating evolutionary story, one that sheds much light on the evolutionary process in general. We humans, too, show signs of the domestication syndrome, which some believe was key to our evolutionary success. By this view human evolution parallels the evolution of dogs from wolves, in particular. PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2015 Richard C. Francis (P)2015 Audible, Inc.

Length: 13 hrs and 6 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Paleofantasy

Paleofantasy

3 ratings

Summary

An exposé of pseudoscientific myths about our evolutionary past and how we should live today. We evolved to eat berries rather than bagels, to live in mud huts rather than condos, to sprint barefoot rather than play football - or did we? Are our bodies and brains truly at odds with modern life? Although it may seem as though we have barely had time to shed our hunter-gatherer legacy, biologist Marlene Zuk reveals that the story is not so simple. Popular theories about how our ancestors lived - and why we should emulate them - are often based on speculation, not scientific evidence. Armed with a razor-sharp wit and brilliant, eye-opening research, Zuk takes us to the cutting edge of biology to show that evolution can work much faster than was previously realized, meaning that we are not biologically the same as our caveman ancestors. Contrary to what the glossy magazines would have us believe, we do not enjoy potato chips because they crunch just like the insects our forebears snacked on. And women don’t go into shoe-shopping frenzies because their prehistoric foremothers gathered resources for their clans. As Zuk compellingly argues, such beliefs incorrectly assume that we’re stuck - finished evolving - and have been for tens of thousands of years. She draws on fascinating evidence that examines everything from adults’ ability to drink milk to the texture of our ear wax to show that we’ve actually never stopped evolving. From debunking the caveman diet to unraveling gender stereotypes, Zuk delivers an engrossing analysis of widespread paleofantasies and the scientific evidence that undermines them, all the while broadening our understanding of our origins and what they can really tell us about our present and our future.

©2013 Marlene Zuk (P)2013 Audible, Inc.

Narrator: Laura Darrell
Length: 10 hrs and 46 mins
Available on Audible
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Gods of the Upper Air

8 ratings

Summary

2020 Anisfield-Wolf Book Award Winner Finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award From an award-winning historian comes a dazzling history of the birth of cultural anthropology and the adventurous scientists who pioneered it - a sweeping chronicle of discovery and the fascinating origin story of our multicultural world. A century ago, everyone knew that people were fated by their race, sex, and nationality to be more or less intelligent, nurturing, or warlike. But Columbia University professor Franz Boas looked at the data and decided everyone was wrong. Racial categories, he insisted, were biological fictions. Cultures did not come in neat packages labeled "primitive" or "advanced". What counted as a family, a good meal, or even common sense was a product of history and circumstance, not of nature. In Gods of the Upper Air, a masterful narrative history of radical ideas and passionate lives, Charles King shows how these intuitions led to a fundamental reimagining of human diversity. Boas' students were some of the century's most colorful figures and unsung visionaries: Margaret Mead, the outspoken field researcher whose Coming of Age in Samoa is among the most widely read works of social science of all time; Ruth Benedict, the great love of Mead's life, whose research shaped post-Second World War Japan; Ella Deloria, the Dakota Sioux activist who preserved the traditions of Native Americans on the Great Plains; and Zora Neale Hurston, whose studies under Boas fed directly into her now classic novel, Their Eyes Were Watching God. Together, they mapped civilizations from the American South to the South Pacific and from Caribbean islands to Manhattan's city streets, and unearthed an essential fact buried by centuries of prejudice: that humanity is an undivided whole. Their revolutionary findings would go on to inspire the fluid conceptions of identity we know today. Rich in drama, conflict, friendship, and love, Gods of the Upper Air is a brilliant and groundbreaking history of American progress and the opening of the modern mind.

©2019 Charles King (P)2019 Random House Audio

Narrator: January LaVoy
Author: Charles King
Length: 13 hrs and 32 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for You and Me

You and Me

Summary

What is it that makes you distinct from me? Identity is a term much used but hard to define. For that very reason, it has long been a topic of fascination for philosophers but has been regarded with aversion by neuroscientists - until now. Susan Greenfield takes us on a journey in search of a biological interpretation of this most elusive of concepts, guiding us through the social and psychiatric perspectives and ultimately to the heart of the physical brain. Greenfield argues that as the brain adapts exquisitely to environment, the cultural challenges of the 21st century, with its screen-based technologies, mean that we are facing unprecedented changes to identity itself.

©2017 Susan Greenfield (P)2018 Audible, Ltd

Narrator: Lisa Armytage
Length: 4 hrs and 15 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Origin of Feces

The Origin of Feces

2 ratings

Summary

An entertaining and enlightening exploration of why waste matters, this cultural history explores an often ignored subject matter and makes a compelling argument for a deeper understanding of human and animal waste. Approaching the subject from a variety of perspectives - evolutionary, ecological, and cultural - this examination shows how integral excrement is to biodiversity, agriculture, public health, food production and distribution, and global ecosystems. From primordial ooze, dung beetles, bug frass, cat scats, and flush toilets to global trade, pandemics, and energy, this is the awesome, troubled, uncensored story of feces.

©2013 David Waltner-Toews (P)2013 Audible, Inc.

Narrator: Kevin Scollin
Length: 6 hrs and 40 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Creadores de Hits [Hit Makers]

Creadores de Hits [Hit Makers]

Summary

Nada «se vuelve viral». Si crees que una película, canción o app popular surgió de la nada para convertirse, de boca en boca, en un éxito, te estás perdiendo la historia real. Cada éxito de taquilla tiene una historia secreta de poder, influencia, emisoras oscuras y cultos apasionados que convierten algunos productos nuevos en fenómenos culturales.  Incluso las ideas más brillantes se marchitan en la oscuridad si no se conectan a la red correcta. En su pionera investigación, el editor de Atlantic Derek Thompson nos descubre la psicología oculta en por qué nos gusta lo que nos gusta y revela la economía de los mercados culturales que, invisiblemente, moldean nuestras vidas.  Rompiendo mitos sentimentales de la creación de éxitos que dominan la cultura y el negocio pop, nos muestra que la calidad no es suficiente para el éxito. Puede que este sea un mundo nuevo, pero hay algunas verdades perdurables sobre lo que quieren las audiencias y los consumidores. Toda empresa, artista o persona que busque promocionarse quiere saber qué es lo que hace que algunas obras tengan tanto éxito, mientras otras desaparecen.  Creadores de hits es un viaje mágico y misterioso a través de los éxitos de la cultura pop del siglo XX y la moneda más valiosa del siglo XXI: la atención de la gente. Desde los comienzos del arte impresionista hasta el futuro de Facebook, desde los pequeños diseñadores de Etsy hasta el origen de La guerra de las galaxias, Thompson relata la fascinante historia de las causas de la popularidad y del modo en que la cultura cobra vida. Please note: This audiobook is in Spanish.

©2018 Derek Thompson (P)2020 Audible, Inc.

Narrator: Alex Magaña
Length: 10 hrs and 30 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Minds Make Societies

Minds Make Societies

2 ratings

Summary

A watershed book that masterfully integrates insights from evolutionary biology, genetics, psychology, economics, and more to explore the development and workings of human societies “There is no good reason why human societies should not be described and explained with the same precision and success as the rest of nature.” Thus argues evolutionary psychologist Pascal Boyer in this uniquely innovative book. Integrating recent insights from evolutionary biology, genetics, psychology, economics, and other fields, Boyer offers precise models of why humans engage in social behaviors such as forming families, tribes, and nations, or creating gender roles. In fascinating, thought-provoking passages, he explores questions such as: Why is there conflict between groups? Why do people believe low-value information such as rumors? Why are there religions? What is social justice? What explains morality? Boyer provides a new picture of cultural transmission that draws on the pragmatics of human communication, the constructive nature of memory in human brains, and human motivation for group formation and cooperation.

©2018 Pascal Boyer. (P)2018 Brilliance Publishing, Inc., all rights reserved.

Narrator: Tom Parks
Author: Pascal Boyer
Length: 13 hrs and 4 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for 50 Great Myths of Human Evolution

50 Great Myths of Human Evolution

Summary

50 Great Myths of Human Evolution uses common misconceptions to explore basic theory and research in human evolution and strengthen critical thinking skills for lay audiences, listeners, and students. Examines intriguing - yet widely misunderstood - topics, from general ideas about evolution and human origins to the evolution of modern humans and recent trends in the field Describes what fossils, archaeology, and genetics can tell us about human origins Demonstrates the ways in which science adapts and changes over time to incorporate new evidence and better explanations Includes myths such as: "Humans lived at the same time as dinosaurs"; "Lucy was so small because she was a child"; "Our ancestors have always made fire"; and "There is a strong relationship between brain size and intelligence."

©2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. (P)2017 Gildan Media LLC

Narrator: Steven Menasche
Length: 14 hrs and 11 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Fire: A Brief History

Fire: A Brief History

Summary

Over vast expanses of time, fire and humanity have interacted to expand the domain of each, transforming the earth and what it means to be human. In this concise yet wide-ranging book, Stephen J. Pyne - named by Science magazine as "the world's leading authority on the history of fire" - explores the surprising dynamics of fire before humans, fire and human origins, aboriginal economies of hunting and foraging, agricultural and pastoral uses of fire, fire ceremonies, fire as an idea and a technology, and industrial fire. In this revised and expanded audiobook edition, Pyne looks to the future of fire as a constant, defining presence on Earth. A new chapter explores the importance of fire in the 21st century, with special attention to its role in the Anthropocene, or what he posits might equally be called the Pyrocene. The book is published by University of Washington Press. The audiobook is published by University Press Audiobooks. Praise for the book: "No one is better qualified to teach us about fire's history, fire's crucial role in shaping landscapes, than Stephen Pyne." (The New York Times) "Pyne is the world's leading authority on the history of fire, and his erudition is phenomenal." (Science) "Stephen J. Pyne writes about fire as if he were on fire, with searing, consuming heat and light." (Seattle Times)

©2019 Stephen J. Pyne (P)2019 Redwood Audiobooks

Narrator: Jack de Golia
Length: 9 hrs and 27 mins
Available on Audible
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Civilization

40 ratings

Summary

The rise to global predominance of Western civilization is the single most important historical phenomenon of the past five hundred years. All over the world, an astonishing proportion of people now work for Western-style companies, study at Western-style universities, vote for Western-style governments, take Western medicines, wear Western clothes, and even work Western hours. Yet six hundred years ago the petty kingdoms of Western Europe seemed unlikely to achieve much more than perpetual internecine warfare. It was Ming China or Ottoman Turkey that had the look of world civilizations. How did the West overtake its Eastern rivals? And has the zenith of Western power now passed? In Civilization: The West and the Rest, bestselling author Niall Ferguson argues that, beginning in the fifteenth century, the West developed six powerful new concepts that the Rest lacked: competition, science, the rule of law, consumerism, modern medicine, and the work ethic.

©2011 Niall Ferguson (P)2011 Tantor

Narrator: Niall Ferguson
Length: 13 hrs and 5 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Summary of Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari

Summary of Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari

3 ratings

Summary

From where did the world appear?  Is the creation story true?  Why is Man the way he is?  Were there men before you and me?  Would there be other species after you and me?  Religion and politics: What is their origin? And why do they rule our world so strongly?  Oh well! You might be in for a shocker! If you were told today that you come from a lineage of animals, and probably have some apes and chimpanzees as long-lost cousins, what would you think? If you knew that the creation story was just make-believe invented to control your world, what would you say? What if you were told that your species would one day come to an end?  All of these and many more are the topics explored in Sapiens. In the book Sapiens, Yuval Noah Harari discusses all you need to know about who you are and where you come from, and debunks the many myths that have lived with us until now.  This book contains a comprehensive, well-detailed summary and key takeaways of the original book by Yuval Noah Harari. It summarizes the book in detail, to help people effectively understand and imbibe the original work by Noah. This book is not meant to replace the original book but to serve as a companion to it. Contained are: Executive summary of the original book  Key points of each chapter and  Brief chapter-by-chapter summaries Disclaimer: This is a summary and review of the book Sapiens and not the original book.

©2018 Book Addict (P)2019 Book Addict

Narrator: Jeff Lechtanski
Author: Book Addict
Length: 2 hrs and 23 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Rammer Jammer Yellow Hammer

Rammer Jammer Yellow Hammer

Summary

In the life of every sports fan, there comes a moment of reckoning. It may happen when your team wins on a last-second field goal and you suddenly find yourself clenched in a loving embrace with a large hairy man you've never met. Or in the long, hormonally depleted days after a loss, when you're felled by a sensation similar to the one you first experienced following the death of a pet. At such moments the fan is forced to confront the question others, spouses, friends, children, and colleagues, have asked for years: Why do I care? What is it about sports that turns otherwise sane, rational people into raving lunatics? Why does winning compel people to tear down goalposts, and losing, to drown themselves in bad keg beer? In short, why do fans care? In search of the answers to these questions, Warren St. John seeks out the roving community of RVers who follow the Alabama Crimson Tide from game to game across the South. A movable feast of Weber grills, Igloo coolers, and die-hard superstition, these are characters who arrive on Wednesday for Saturday's game: Freeman and Betty Reese, who skipped their own daughter's wedding because it coincided with a Bama game; Ray Pradat, the Episcopalian minister who watches the games on a television set beside his altar while performing weddings; John Ed (pronounced as three syllables, John Ay-ud), the wheeling and dealing ticket scalper whose access to good seats gives him power on par with the governor; and Paul Finebaum, the Anti-Fan, a wisecracking sports columnist and talk-radio host who makes his living mocking Alabama fans, and who has to live in a gated community for all the threats he receives in response. In no time at all, St. John himself is drawn into the world of full-immersion fandom: he buys an RV and joins the caravan for a football season, chronicling the world of the extreme fan and learning that in the shadow of the stadium, it can all begin to seem strangely normal.

©2004 Warren St. John (P)2004 Random House, Inc. Random House Audio, a divison of Random House, Inc.

Narrator: Warren St. John
Length: 5 hrs and 2 mins
Available on Audible
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Mom Genes

Summary

"For anyone who is a mother, or who has a mother, [Mom Genes] is an eye-opening tour through the biology and psychology of a role that is at once utterly ordinary and wondrously strange." (Annie Murphy Paul, author of Origins)  From the New York Times best-selling author of The Lion in the Living Room comes a fascinating and provocative exploration of the biology of motherhood. Everyone knows how babies are made, but scientists are only just beginning to understand the making of a mother. Mom Genes reveals the hard science behind our tenderest maternal impulses, tackling questions such as whether a new mom’s brain ever really bounces back, why mothers are destined to mimic their own moms (or not), and how maternal aggression makes females the world’s most formidable creatures. Part scientific odyssey, part memoir, Mom Genes weaves the latest research with Abigail Tucker’s personal experiences to create a delightful, surprising, and poignant portrait of motherhood. It’s vital listening for anyone who has ever wondered what rocks the hand that rocks the cradle. 

©2021 Abigail Tucker. All rights reserved. (P)2021 Simon & Schuster, Inc. All rights reserved.

Narrator: Samantha Desz
Length: 9 hrs and 30 mins
Available on Audible
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Everything All at Once

43 ratings

Summary

Bill Nye has been the public face of science for more than 20 years. In Everything All at Once, the New York Times best-selling author urges listeners to become activists and agents of change. Everything All at Once is an exciting, inspiring call to unleash the power of the nerd mindset that exists within us all. Nye believes we'll never be able to tackle our society's biggest, most complex problems if we don't even know how to solve the small ones. Step by step, he shows his listeners the key tools behind his everything-all-at-once approach: radical curiosity, a deep desire for a better future, and a willingness to take the actions needed to make it a reality. Problem solving is a skill that anyone can harness to create change, and Bill Nye is here to teach us how. Each chapter describes a principle of problem solving that Nye himself uses - methodical, fact-based approaches to life that aspires to leave no stone unturned. He explains how the nerd mindset leads to a richer and more meaningful life; far more than that, it can help address hunger, crime, poverty, pollution, and even assist the democratic process. Throughout the book, Nye draws on his own experiences - leavened with his trademark humor and self-deprecation - to show how he came to think like a Science Guy, and how you can, too. By the end you will be ready to sort out problems, recognize solutions, and join him in changing the world.

©2017 Bill Nye (P)2017 Recorded Books

Narrator: Bill Nye
Author: Bill Nye
Length: 12 hrs and 34 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Art of Making Memories

The Art of Making Memories

4 ratings

Summary

A practical guide to creating memorable moments from Meik Wiking, New York Times best-selling author of The Little Book of Hygge. Every year, we are given a fixed number of days. Some days pass us by without leaving a trace - and some days we remember forever. Do you remember your first kiss? Or how the first rays of the spring sun feel? Or how about the best meal you ever had? These memorable experiences are characterized by intensity of perception, depth of feeling, or sense of profound significance causing them to stand out in our mind and involve a heightened sense of wonder and awe. But what ingredients produce these happy memories? Why is it that a piece of music, a smell or a taste can take us back to something we had forgotten? And can we learn to create happy memories and be better at holding on to them? Combining research on happiness and mnemonics (learning techniques that aid memory retention or retrieval), Meik Wiking explores how peak experiences are made, stored, and remembered. Using data and diaries, interviews, global surveys and studies, and conducting real-life behavioural science and happiness experiments, The Art of Making Memories will answer how we can create perfect moments. Moments that will go down in history. This audiobook will help you create more peak experiences, help you retrieve happy memories of the past, and store them for the future.

©2019 Meik Wiking (P)2019 Penguin Canada

Narrator: Meik Wiking
Author: Meik Wiking
Length: 4 hrs and 34 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Making War at Fort Hood

Making War at Fort Hood

Summary

Making War at Fort Hood offers an illuminating look at war through the daily lives of the people whose job it is to produce it. Kenneth MacLeish conducted a year of intensive fieldwork among soldiers and their families at and around the US Army's Fort Hood in central Texas. He shows how war's reach extends far beyond the battlefield into military communities where violence is as routine, boring, and normal as it is shocking and traumatic. Fort Hood is one of the largest military installations in the world, and many of the 55,000 personnel based there have served multiple tours in Iraq and Afghanistan. MacLeish provides intimate portraits of Fort Hood's soldiers and those closest to them, drawing on numerous in-depth interviews and diverse ethnographic material. He explores the exceptional position that soldiers occupy in relation to violence--not only trained to fight and kill, but placed deliberately in harm's way and offered up to die. The death and destruction of war happen to soldiers on purpose. MacLeish interweaves gripping narrative with critical theory and anthropological analysis to vividly describe this unique condition of vulnerability. Along the way, he sheds new light on the dynamics of military family life, stereotypes of veterans, what it means for civilians to say "thank you" to soldiers, and other questions about the sometimes ordinary, sometimes agonizing labor of making war. Making War at Fort Hood is the first ethnography to examine the everyday lives of the soldiers, families, and communities who personally bear the burden of America's most recent wars.

©2013 Princeton University Press (P)2013 Audible, Inc.

Narrator: Ralph Morocco
Length: 10 hrs and 41 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Baby Bust

Baby Bust

Summary

Lean in. Opt out. Have it all. None of the above. A new audiobook based on a groundbreaking cross-generational study reveals both greater freedom and new constraints for men and women in their work and family lives. Stew Friedman, founding director of The Wharton School's Work/Life Integration Project, studied two generations of Wharton college students as they graduated: Gen Xers in 1992 and Millennials in 2012. The cross-generational study produced a stark discovery - the rate of graduates who plan to have children has dropped by nearly half over the past 20 years. At the same time, men and women are now more aligned in their attitudes about dual-career relationships, and they are opting out of parenthood in equal proportions. But their reasons for doing so are quite different. In his new audiobook, Baby Bust: New Choices for Men and Women in Work and Family, Friedman draws on this unique research to explain why so many young people are not planning to become parents. He reveals good news, that there is a greater freedom of choice now, and bad, that new constraints are limiting people's options. In light of these present realities, he offers ideas for what we can do as a society, in our organizations, and for ourselves to make it easier for men and women to choose the lives they want. In this audiobook, Friedman addresses: How views about work and family have changed in the past 20 years Why men and women have different reasons for opting out of parenthood How family has been redefined Why we are all now part of a revolution in work and family What choices we face in our social and educational policy How organizations and individuals - especially men - can spur cultural change In the debates on work and family, people of all generations are calling for a reasoned, thoughtful, research-driven contribution to the discussion. In Baby Bust, Friedman offers just that: an astute assessment of how far we have come and where we need to go from here. Gildan Media is proud to bring you another Wharton Digital Press Audiobook. These notable audiobooks contain the essential tools that can be applied to every facet of your career.

©2013 Stewart D. Friedman (P)2013 Gildan Media LLC

Narrator: Don Hagen
Length: 2 hrs and 56 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Age of Empathy

The Age of Empathy

1 rating

Summary

Is it really human nature to stab one another in the back in our climb up the corporate ladder? Competitive, selfish behavior is often explained away as instinctive, thanks to evolution and "survival of the fittest", but in fact, humans are equally hard-wired for empathy. Using research from the fields of anthropology, psychology, animal behavior, and neuroscience, Frans de Waal brilliantly argues that humans are group animals - highly cooperative, sensitive to injustice, and mostly peace-loving - just like other primates, elephants, and dolphins. This revelation has profound implications for everything from politics to office culture.

©2009 Frans de Waal (P)2009 Tantor

Narrator: Alan Sklar
Length: 10 hrs and 1 min
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Waste Land and Other Poems

The Waste Land and Other Poems

2 ratings

Summary

'The Waste Land' is a landmark in 20th-century poetry. Here it is read by the late Poet Laureate Ted Hughes. Published in 1922, it is a brilliant exploration of a faithless, immoral society trying to rebuild itself after the devastation of the Great War. Rich in literary references and steeped in allusive and evocative imagery, 'The Waste Land' is widely considered to be the pinnacle of modernist poetry. This audiobook also contains some of Eliot's other poems, including 'The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock', 'Sweeney Among the Nightingales', 'Ash Wednesday' and 'Journey of the Magi'. Thomas Stearns Eliot was born in St Louis, Missouri, in 1888. He came to England in 1914 and published his first book of poems in 1917. He received the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1948. Eliot died in 1965. Ted Hughes (1930-1998) was born in Yorkshire. His first book, The Hawk in the Rain, was published by Faber and Faber and was followed by many volumes of poetry and prose for adults and children, including River (1983). He received the Whitbread Book of the Year for both Tales from Ovid (1997) and Birthday Letters (1998). He was Poet Laureate from 1984, and in 1998 he was appointed to the Order of Merit.

©1922 T. S. Eliot (P)1997 Faber Audio

Narrator: Ted Hughes
Author: T. S. Eliot
Length: 1 hr and 9 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Mothers and Others

Mothers and Others

1 rating

Summary

Somewhere in Africa, more than a million years ago, a line of apes began to rear their young differently than their Great Ape ancestors. From this new form of care came new ways of engaging and understanding each other. How such singular human capacities evolved, and how they have kept us alive for thousands of generations, is the mystery revealed in this bold and wide-ranging new vision of human emotional evolution. Mothers and Others finds the key in the primatologically unique length of human childhood. If the young were to survive in a world of scarce food, they needed to be cared for, not only by their mothers but also by siblings, aunts, fathers, friends - and, with any luck, grandmothers. Out of this complicated and contingent form of childrearing, Sarah Hrdy argues, came the human capacity for understanding others. Mothers and others teach us who will care, and who will not. From its opening vision of "apes on a plane;" to descriptions of baby care among marmosets, chimpanzees, wolves, and lions; to explanations about why men in hunter-gatherer societies hunt together, Mothers and Others is compelling to listen to. But it is also an intricately knit argument that ever since the Pleistocene, it has taken a village to raise children - and how that gave our ancient ancestors the first push on the path toward becoming emotionally modern human beings.

©2009 Sarah Blaffer Hrdy (P)2013 Audible, Inc.

Narrator: Helen Stern
Length: 11 hrs and 35 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Cro-Magnon

Cro-Magnon

2 ratings

Summary

Best-selling author Brian Fagan brings early humans out of the deep freeze with his trademark mix of erudition, cutting-edge science, and vivid storytelling. Cro-Magnon reveals human society in its infancy, facing enormous environmental challenges - including a rival species of humans, the Neanderthals. For ten millennia, Cro-Magnons lived side by side with Neanderthals, an encounter that Fagan fills with drama. Using their superior intellects and tools, these ingenious problem solvers survived harsh conditions that eventually extinguished their Neanderthal cousins. Cro-Magnon captures the indomitable adaptability that has made Homo sapiens an unmatched success as a species. Living on a frozen continent with only the most basic tools, Ice Age humans survived and thrived.

©2010 Brian Fagan (P)2010 Tantor

Narrator: James Langton
Author: Brian Fagan
Length: 9 hrs and 52 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Buying In

Buying In

Summary

Marketing executives and consumer advocates alike predict a future of brand-proof consumers, armed with technology and a sophisticated understanding of marketing techniques, who can effectively tune out ad campaigns. But as Rob Walker demonstrates, this widely accepted misconception has eclipsed the real changes in the way modern consumers relate to their brands of choice. Combine this with marketers' new ability to blur the line between advertising, entertainment, and public space, and you have dramatically altered the relationship between consumer and consumed.

©2008 Rob Walker (P)2008 BBC Audiobooks America

Narrator: Robert Fass
Author: Rob Walker
Length: 9 hrs and 21 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Meaning of Human Existence

The Meaning of Human Existence

2 ratings

Summary

Searching for meaning in what Nietzsche once called “the rainbow colors” around the outer edges of knowledge and imagination, Edward O. Wilson bridges science and philosophy to create a 21st century treatise on human existence. Once criticized for his over-reliance on genetics, Wilson unfurls here his most expansive and advanced theories on human behavior, recognizing that, even though the human and spider evolved similarly, the poet’s sonnet is wholly different than the spider’s web. Whether attempting to explicate "the Riddle of the Human Species", warning of "the Collapse of Biodiversity", or even creating a plausible "Portrait of E.T.", Wilson does indeed believe that humanity holds a special position in the known universe. Alarmed, however, that we are about to abandon natural selection by redesigning biology and human nature as we wish them, Wilson concludes that advances in science and technology bring us our greatest moral dilemma since God stayed the hand of Abraham. Edward O. Wilson is widely recognized as one of the world’s leading scientists. He is the winner of the Pulitzer Prize and the author of the best-selling The Social Conquest of Earth and Letters to a Young Scientist.

©2014 Edward O. Wilson (P)2014 Recorded Books

Narrator: Jonathan Hogan
Length: 5 hrs and 6 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Masters of the Planet

Masters of the Planet

3 ratings

Summary

Fifty thousand years ago - merely a blip in evolutionary time - our Homo sapiens ancestors were competing for existence with several other human species, just as their precursors had done for millions of years. Yet something about our species distinguished it from the pack, and ultimately led to its survival while the rest became extinct. Just what was it that allowed Homo sapiens to become masters of the planet? Ian Tattersall, curator emeritus at the American Museum of Natural History, takes us deep into the fossil record to uncover what made humans so special. Surveying a vast field from initial bipedality to language and intelligence, Tattersall argues that Homo sapiens acquired a winning combination of traits that was not the result of long-term evolutionary refinement. Instead, the final result emerged quickly, shocking our world and changing it forever.

©2012 Ian Tattersall (P)2019 Tantor

Narrator: Bob Souer
Length: 8 hrs and 43 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Sediments of Time

The Sediments of Time

3 ratings

Summary

Meave Leakey’s thrilling, high-stakes memoir - written with her daughter Samira - encapsulates her distinguished life and career on the front lines of the hunt for our human origins, a quest made all the more notable by her stature as a woman in a highly competitive, male-dominated field. In The Sediments of Time, preeminent paleoanthropologist Meave Leakey brings us along on her remarkable journey to reveal the diversity of our early pre-human ancestors and how past climate change drove their evolution. She offers a fresh account of our past, as recent breakthroughs have allowed new analysis of her team’s fossil findings and vastly expanded our understanding of our ancestors.  Meave’s own personal story is replete with drama, from thrilling discoveries on the shores of Lake Turkana to run-ins with armed herders and every manner of wildlife, to raising her children and supporting her renowned paleoanthropologist husband Richard Leakey’s ambitions amidst social and political strife in Kenya. When Richard needs a kidney, Meave provides him with hers, and when he asks her to assume the reins of their field expeditions after he loses both legs in a plane crash, the result of likely sabotage, Meave steps in.  The Sediments of Time is the summation of a lifetime of Meave Leakey’s efforts; it is a compelling picture of our human origins and climate change, as well as a high-stakes story of ambition, struggle, and hope.  "A fascinating glimpse into our origins. Meave Leakey is a great storyteller, and she presents new information about the far off time when we emerged from our ape-like ancestors to start the long journey that has led to our becoming the dominant species on Earth. That story, woven into her own journey of research and discovery, gives us a book that is informative and captivating, one that you will not forget." (Jane Goodall, PhD, DBE, founder of the Jane Goodall Institute)

©2020 Meave Leakey and Samira Leakey (P)2020 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company

Narrator: Susan Lyons
Length: 14 hrs and 35 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Food, Genes, and Culture

Food, Genes, and Culture

Summary

Vegan, low fat, low carb, slow carb: Every diet seems to promise a one-size-fits-all solution to health. But they ignore the diversity of human genes and how they interact with what we eat. In Food, Genes, and Culture, renowned ethnobotanist Gary Nabhan shows why the perfect diet for one person could be disastrous for another. If your ancestors were herders in Northern Europe, milk might well provide you with important nutrients, whereas if you’re Native American, you have a higher likelihood of lactose intolerance. If your roots lie in the Greek islands, the acclaimed Mediterranean diet might save your heart; if not, all that olive oil could just give you stomach cramps. Nabhan traces food traditions around the world, from Bali to Mexico, uncovering the links between ancestry and individual responses to food. The implications go well beyond personal taste. Today’s widespread mismatch between diet and genes is leading to serious health conditions, including a dramatic growth over the last 50 years in auto-immune and inflammatory diseases. Readers will not only learn why diabetes is running rampant among indigenous peoples and heart disease has risen among those of northern European descent, but may find the path to their own perfect diet.

©2004, 2013 Gary Paul Nabhan (P)2013 Audible, Inc.

Length: 6 hrs and 4 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Lolita Pille

Lolita Pille

Summary

Au micro de Lauren Bastide, Lolita Pille parle de ce qu'elle ressent alors qu'elle sort du silence après 11 ans, de son enfance à Boulogne, entre bourgeoisie et milieu populaire, de l'arrogance de son adolescence, de l'importance de la fête, de l'écriture de Hell à 17 ans, du désir projectif des hommes, du personnage qu'on lui a assigné, de l'incarnation d'un héros masculin dans Crépuscule Ville, de la tentation du suicide face aux violences de genre et de la puissance de la sororité. Lolita Pille est l'autrice d'un des romans les plus frappants du début des années 2000, Hell. Née en 1982, elle l'écrit en terminale et est emportée, dès sa parution en 2002, dans son succès médiatique et littéraire. Vendu à plus de 170 000 exemplaires et adapté en film en 2006, il marque durablement les esprits et la création littéraire. Elle publie ensuite Bubble Gum dans la veine de Hell, puis un roman policier d'anticipation, Crépuscule Ville, mal compris par la critique littéraire. Elle se retire alors pendant un peu plus de dix ans et disparaît de la scène médiatique. Son nouveau roman, Eléna et les joueuses, vient de paraître. La voix que vous entendez dans l’introduction est celle de Françoise Sagan au micro de Jacques Chancel dans Radioscopie en 1975. La Poudre est une production Nouvelles Écoutes Réalisation et générique : Aurore Meyer-Mahieu Coordination : Gaïa Marty Mixage : Charles de Cillia.

©2019 Nouvelles Écoutes (P)2019 Nouvelles Écoutes

Length: 1 hr and 6 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Great Cat Massacre

The Great Cat Massacre

Summary

The landmark history of France and French culture in the 18th century, a winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. When the apprentices of a Paris printing shop in the 1730s held a series of mock trials and then hanged all the cats they could lay their hands on, why did they find it so hilariously funny that they choked with laughter when they reenacted it in pantomime some 20 times?  Why in the 18th century version of Little Red Riding Hood did the wolf eat the child at the end?  What did the anonymous townsman of Montpelier have in mind when he kept an exhaustive dossier on all the activities of his native city?  These are some of the provocative questions the distinguished Harvard historian Robert Darnton answers in The Great Cat Massacre, a kaleidoscopic view of European culture during what we like to call "The Age of Enlightenment". A classic of European history, it is an essential starting point for understanding Enlightenment France.

©2009 Robert Darnton (P)2020 Hachette Audio

Narrator: Ken Kliban
Length: 10 hrs and 4 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Mysteries of the Middle Ages

Mysteries of the Middle Ages

Summary

After the long period of cultural decline known as the Dark Ages, Europe experienced a rebirth of scholarship, art, literature, philosophy, and science and began to develop a vision of Western society that remains at the heart of Western civilization today. By placing the image of the Virgin Mary at the center of their churches and their lives, medieval people exalted womanhood to a level unknown in any previous society. For the first time, men began to treat women with dignity and women took up professions that had always been closed to them. The communion bread, believed to be the body of Jesus, encouraged the formulation of new questions in philosophy: Could reality be so fluid that one substance could be transformed into another? Could ordinary bread become a holy reality? Could mud become gold, as the alchemists believed? These new questions pushed the minds of medieval thinkers toward what would become modern science. Artists began to ask themselves similar questions. How can we depict human anatomy so that it looks real to the viewer? How can we depict motion in a composition that never moves? How can two dimensions appear to be three? Medieval artists (and writers, too) invented the Western tradition of realism.  On visits to the great cities of Europe - monumental Rome; the intellectually explosive Paris of Peter Abelard and Thomas Aquinas; the hotbed of scientific study that was Oxford; and the incomparable Florence of Dante and Giotto - Cahill brilliantly captures the spirit of experimentation, the colorful pageantry, and the passionate pursuit of knowledge that built the foundations for the modern world.

©2006 Thomas Cahill (P)2006 Random House, Inc. Random House Audio, a division of Random House, Inc.

Narrator: Thomas Cahill
Length: 6 hrs and 27 mins
Available on Audible
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Tales of a Female Nomad

4 ratings

Summary

Tales of a Female Nomad is the story of Rita Golden Gelman, an ordinary woman who is living an extraordinary existence. At the age of 48, on the verge of a divorce, Rita left an elegant life in Los Angeles to follow her dream of connecting with people in cultures all over the world. In 1986, she sold her possessions and became a nomad, living in a Zapotec village in Mexico, sleeping with sea lions on the Galapagos Islands, and residing everywhere from thatched huts to regal palaces. She has observed orangutans in the rain forest of Borneo, visited trance healers and dens of black magic, and cooked with women on fires all over the world. Rita's example encourages us all to dust off our dreams and rediscover the joy, the exuberance, and the hidden spirit that so many of us bury when we become adults.

©2001 Rita Golden Gelman (P)2014 Tantor

Length: 12 hrs and 41 mins
Available on Audible
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The Blue Man

Summary

Written by a leading dermatologist, The Blue Man and Other Stories of the Skin provides a compelling and accessible introduction to the life of our largest organ, while also recounting the author’s experiences with memorable patients he has treated who suffer from mysterious skin conditions. Robert Norman begins by highlighting the qualities of the skin, tracing the history of its conditions and diseases, then examining the cultural, social and psychological impact of both color and irregularity. The audiobook also features an absorbing collection of stories about some of his most intriguing patients: from a man whose skin mysteriously turned blue, to a hypochondriacal woman who begins to show signs of a life-threatening disease. This is a fascinating account of the dynamic nature of the skin, and the people who inhabit it.

©2014 The Regents of the University of California (P)2014 Audible Inc.

Narrator: John McLain
Length: 3 hrs and 43 mins
Available on Audible
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This is Your Country on Drugs

Summary

Past antidrug campaigns actually encouraged drug use. A few years ago, America stopped dropping acid altogether. The meth epidemic peaked a long, long time ago. NAFTA opened the border and created a bonanza for cocaine and meth traffickers just as President Clinton knew it would. President Reagan may have inadvertently caused the crack epidemic. Kids today are doing fewer illegal drugs than kids from any time in the recent past, and for a surprising reason. The fastest-growing drug in America is a legal hallucinogen you can buy on the Internet.

©2009 Ryan Grim (P)2009 Audible, Inc.

Narrator: Milton Bagby
Author: Ryan Grim
Length: 10 hrs and 24 mins
Available on Audible
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Laurence Lascary

Summary

Au micro de Lauren Bastide, Laurence Lascary parle de son choix d'être productrice, de son enfance en banlieue parisienne, de son attachement au département de la Seine Saint-Denis, des films qui l'ont marquée et du chemin qu'elle s'est tracée. Elle évoque aussi son passage à New York et l'optimisme qu'elle en a rapporté, à quel point les représentations comptent, son rôle en tant qu'actrice du changement, la complexité des sujets qu'elle porte et son expérience d'écriture. Laurence Lascary est productrice. Née en 1980, elle grandit à Bobigny. Après un master à la Sorbonne et à l'INA, elle travaille à Studio Canal, puis part à New York pour un poste chez Unifrance. L'optimisme qu'elle tire de cette expérience la pousse en 2008 à monter sa propre structure de production sans attendre : "De l'Autre Côté du Périph". Grâce à sa société, elle s'attache à faire bouger les lignes des représentations. Après plusieurs puissants documentaires pour la télévision, elle produit en 2016 un premier long-métrage, "L'Ascension", qui rafle le prix du public et le grand prix du jury au festival de l'Alpe d'Huez et fait plus d'un million d'entrées. Très engagée, elle est aussi membre du Conseil National des Villes, du Collège diversité du Ministère de la Culture et coprésidente du collectif 50/50 pour 2020 qui lutte pour la parité dans le monde du cinéma.   La Poudre est une production Nouvelles Écoutes Réalisation et générique : Aurore Meyer-Mahieu Mixage du générique du cycle Cinéma : Charles de Cillia Coordination : Gaïa Marty Mixage : Paul Lambert de Cursay.

©2019 Nouvelles Écoutes (P)2019 Nouvelles Écoutes

Available on Audible
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The Accidental Homo Sapiens

1 rating

Summary

What happens now that human population has outpaced biological natural selection? Two leading scientists reveal how we became who we are - and what we might become.  When you think of evolution, the picture that most likely comes to mind is a straight-forward progression, the iconic illustration of a primate morphing into a proud, upright human being. But in reality, random events have played huge roles in determining the evolutionary histories of everything from lions to lobsters to humans. However, random genetic novelties are most likely to become fixed in small populations. It is mathematically unlikely that this will happen in large ones.  With our enormous, close-packed, and seemingly inexorably expanding population, humanity has fallen under the influence of the famous (or infamous) “bell curve.” Ian Tattersall and Rob DeSalle’s revelatory new book explores what the future of our species could hold, while simultaneously revealing what we didn’t become - and what we won’t become.  A cognitively unique species, and our actions fall on a bell curve as well. Individual people may be saintly or evil; generous or grasping; narrow-minded or visionary. But any attempt to characterize our species must embrace all of its members and so all of these antitheses. It is possible not just for the species, but for a single individual to be all of these things - even in the same day. We all fall somewhere within the giant hyperspace of the human condition that these curves describe.  The Accidental Homo Sapiens shows listeners that though humanity now exists on this bell curve, we are far from a stagnant species. Tattersall and DeSalle reveal how biological evolution in modern humans has given way to a cultural dynamic that is unlike anything else the Earth has ever witnessed, and that will keep life interesting - perhaps sometimes too interesting - for as long as we exist on this planet.

©2019 Ian Tattersall and Rob DeSalle (P)2019 Audible, Inc.

Length: 7 hrs and 42 mins
Available on Audible
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Race?: Debunking a Scientific Myth

Summary

Race has provided the rationale and excuse for some of the worst atrocities in human history. Yet, according to many biologists, physical anthropologists, and geneticists, there is no valid scientific justification for the concept of race. To be more precise, although there is clearly some physical basis for the variations that underlie perceptions of race, clear boundaries among "races" remain highly elusive from a purely biological standpoint. Differences among human populations that people intuitively view as "racial" are not only superficial but are also of astonishingly recent origin. In this intriguing and highly accessible audiobook, physical anthropologist Ian Tattersall and geneticist Rob DeSalle, both senior scholars from the American Museum of Natural History, explain what human races actually are - and are not - and place them within the wider perspective of natural diversity. They explain that the relative isolation of local populations of the newly evolved human species during the last Ice Age - when Homo sapiens was spreading across the world from an African point of origin - has now begun to reverse itself, as differentiated human populations come back into contact and interbreed. The book is published by Texas A&M University Press.

©2011 Ian Tattersall and Rob DeSalle (P)2017 Redwood Audiobooks

Narrator: Peter Lerman
Length: 11 hrs and 55 mins
Available on Audible
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Our Tempestuous Day

Summary

The tumult and opulence of England’s Regency era burst from the pages in this work of literary nonfiction by acclaimed author Carolly Erickson. When dementia forces King George III to vacate his throne, the kingdom slips into a decade marked with excess, scandal, and riots. King George has suffered bouts of mental instability before, but in 1810 he shows no signs of recovering. Public and government business halts as word of his condition leaks out. Hoping to control the crisis, Parliament appoints the king’s unpopular son Prince George IV as Regent or caretaker. But for the next nine years, this substitute ruler shocks the nation with his drunkenness, his mistresses, and his wanton spending. From seething mobs in the streets to Lucullan feasts in drawing rooms, historian Carolly Erickson vividly captures the nation in a troubled transition. With narrator Simon Prebble’s dramatic performance, the splendor and intrigue of Regency England are as enthralling as the most entertaining novel.

©1986 Carolly Erickson (P)1998 Recorded Books, LLC

Narrator: Simon Prebble
Length: 9 hrs and 41 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Top Dog

Top Dog

9 ratings

Summary

It's a dog eat dog world. Don't be on the menu. What are the differences between a winning and losing performance? Why are we able to rise to the challenge one day, but wilt from it the next? Can we in fact become better competitors? In Top Dog, Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman use cutting-edge science to tease out the hidden factors at the core of every great triumph - and every tragic failure. By enabling you to identify your own competitive style, Top Dog will help you tip the odds of success in your favor. Integrating wisdom from politics, finance, genetics, neuroscience, psychology, military training, sports, economics, education and more, Top Dog offers counterintuitive, game-changing insights into the nature of competition, such as: Why the home-field advantage in sports is just as relevant in diplomacy and deal-making That women are better at judging risk, while men are better at ignoring it - and how this plays out on K Street and Wall Street Why younger siblings are more competitive than first-borns, and how early-childhood influences shape competitive styles forever That the shape of entrepreneurs' hands can be just as revealing as their business plans How a single biochemical can predict a winner before an event has even begun Why discord can be better than harmony, and why stars on a team do deserve special treatment As President Dwight Eisenhower said, "What counts is not necessarily the size of the dog in the fight - it's the size of the fight in the dog." In Top Dog, Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman reveal the size of the fight in all of us.

©2013 Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman (P)2013 Hachette Audio

Narrator: Po Bronson
Length: 9 hrs and 6 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Primates of Park Avenue

Primates of Park Avenue

6 ratings

Summary

Like an urban Dian Fossey, Wednesday Martin decodes the primate social behaviors of Upper East Side mothers in a brilliantly original and witty memoir about her adventures assimilating into that most secretive and elite tribe. After marrying a man from the Upper East Side and moving to the neighborhood, Wednesday Martin struggled to fit in. Drawing on her background in anthropology and primatology, she tried looking at her new world through that lens, and suddenly things fell into place. She understood the other mothers' snobbiness at school drop-off when she compared them to olive baboons. Her obsessional quest for a Hermes Birkin handbag made sense when she realized other females wielded them to establish dominance in their troop. And so she analyzed tribal migration patterns; display rituals; physical adornment, mutilation, and mating practices; extra-pair copulation; and more. Her conclusions are smart, thought provoking, and hilariously unexpected. Every city has its Upper East Side, and in Wednesday's memoir listeners everywhere will recognize the strange cultural codes of powerful social hierarchies and the compelling desire to climb them. They will also see that Upper East Side mothers want the same things for their children that all mothers want - safety, happiness, and success - and not even sky-high penthouses and chauffeured SUVs can protect this ecologically released tribe from the universal experiences of anxiety and loss. When Wednesday's life turns upside down, she learns how deep the bonds of female friendship really are. Intelligent, funny, and heartfelt, Primates of Park Avenue lifts a veil on a secret, elite world within a world - the exotic, fascinating, and strangely familiar culture of privileged Manhattan motherhood.

©2015 Wednesday Martin. All rights reserved. (P)2015 Simon & Schuster, Inc. All rights reserved.

Narrator: Madeleine Maby
Length: 8 hrs and 9 mins
Available on Audible
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Ingenious

Summary

In 2007, the X Prize Foundation announced that it would give $10 million to anyone who could build a safe, mass-producible car that could travel one hundred miles on the energy equivalent of a gallon of gas. The challenge attracted more than one hundred teams from all over the world, including dozens of amateurs. Many designed their cars entirely from scratch, rejecting decades of thinking about what a car should look like. Jason Fagone follows four of those teams from the build stage to the final race and beyond - into a world in which destiny hangs on a low drag coefficient and a lug nut can be a beautiful talisman. The result is a gripping story of crazy collaboration, absurd risks, colossal hopes, and poignant losses. In an old pole barn in central Illinois, childhood sweethearts hack together an electric-powered dreamboat, using scavenged parts, forging their own steel, and burning through their life savings. In Virginia, an impassioned entrepreneur and his hand-picked squad of speed freaks pool their imaginations and build a car so light that you can push it across the floor with your thumb. In West Philly, a group of disaffected high school students come into their own as they create a hybrid car with the engine of a Harley motorcycle. And in Southern California, the early favorite - a start-up backed by millions in venture capital-designs a car that looks like an alien egg. Ingenious is a joyride. Fagone takes us into the garages and the minds of the inventors, capturing the fractious yet beautiful process of engineering a bespoke machine. Suspenseful and bighearted, this is the story of ordinary people risking failure, economic ruin, and ridicule to create something vital that Detroit had never pulled off. As the Illinois team wrote in chalk on the wall of their barn, "SOMEBODY HAS TO DO SOMETHING. THAT SOMEBODY IS US."

©2013 Jason Fagone (P)2013 Tantor

Narrator: Adam Verner
Author: Jason Fagone
Length: 12 hrs and 6 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Bones

Bones

Summary

Human bone is versatile and entirely unique: It repairs itself without scarring, it's lightweight but responds to stresses, and it's durable enough to survive for millennia. In Bones, orthopedic surgeon Roy A. Meals explores and extols this amazing material that both supports and records vertebrate life. Inside the body, bone proves itself the world's best building material. Meals examines the biological makeup of bones; demystifies how they grow, break, and heal; and compares the particulars of human bone to variations throughout the animal kingdom. In engaging and clear prose, he debunks familiar myths - humans don't have exactly 206 bones - and illustrates common bone diseases, like osteoporosis and arthritis, and their treatments. Along the way, he highlights the medical innovations - from the first X-rays to advanced operative techniques - that enhance our lives and introduces the giants of orthopedic surgery who developed them. With enthusiasm and humor, Meals also investigates the diverse roles bone has played in human culture throughout history. He highlights allusions to bone in religion and literature, from Adam's rib to Hamlet's skull, and uncovers its enduring presence as fossils, technological tools, and musical instruments ranging from the Tibetan thighbone kangling horn to everyday drumsticks.

©2020 Roy A. Meals, MD (P)2020 Tantor

Narrator: L.J. Ganser
Length: 8 hrs and 12 mins
Available on Audible
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Introducing the Ancient Greeks

2 ratings

Summary

Acclaimed classics scholar Edith Hall's Introducing the Ancient Greeks is the first book to offer a synthesis of the entire ancient Greek experience, from the rise of the Mycenaean kingdoms of the sixteenth century BC to the final victory of Christianity over paganism in AD 391. Each of the ten chapters visits a different Greek community at a different moment during the twenty centuries of ancient Greek history. In the process, the book makes a powerful original argument: A cluster of unique qualities made the Greeks special and made them the right people, at the right time, to take up the baton of human progress. According to Herodotus, the father of history, what made all Greeks identifiably Greek was their common descent from the same heroes, the way they sacrificed to their gods, their rules of decent behavior, and their beautiful language. Edith Hall argues, however, that their mind-set was just as important as their awe-inspiring achievements. They were rebellious, individualistic, inquisitive, open-minded, witty, rivalrous, admiring of excellence, articulate, and addicted to pleasure. But most important was their continuing identity as mariners, the restless seagoing lifestyle that brought them into contact with ethnically diverse peoples in countless new settlements, and the constant stimulus to technological innovation provided by their intense relationship with the sea. Expertly researched and elegantly told, Introducing the Ancient Greeks is an indispensable contribution to our understanding of the Greeks.

©2014 Edith Hall (P)2014 Audible Inc.

Narrator: Sian Thomas
Author: Edith Hall
Length: 12 hrs and 24 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for L'art & la poudre #1 - Laure Prouvost et Martha Kirszenbaum

L'art & la poudre #1 - Laure Prouvost et Martha Kirszenbaum

Summary

L'artiste contemporaine Laure Prouvost et la commissaire d'exposition Martha Kirszenbaum, duo à l'origine du pavillon français de la Biennale de Venise 2019 sont les invitées du premier épisode du cycle L'art & La Poudre. Avec Lauren Bastide, elles ont parlé d'art, de femmes et de poulpe. L'édito de Lauren : L'art n'a pas de nation. L'art n'a pas de temps. L'art n'a pas de sexe. Ou si ? En mai, après l'ouverture de la Biennale, à Venise, l'eau s'est mise à monter. Je suis allée sur le toit du pavillon français. J'ai embarqué dans un bateau, avec deux femmes. C'était Laure Prouvost, l'artiste, et Martha Kirszenbaum, la commissaire. Grandes, lumineuses, musclées, invincibles, belles... On a vogué des jours. On a vogué des nuits. On a atteint une île et on a accosté. Sur le sol, au bord de l'eau, des micros. On s'est assises, et on a parlé. Résumé de l'épisode : Quelle place pour les femmes dans l'art contemporain ? Comment les artistes françaises entrent-elles dans les musées, les foires et prix internationaux, les institutions ? Laure Prouvost, née en 1978 à Croix, est l'une des artistes contemporaines les plus reconnues de sa génération. Avec Martha Kirszenbaum, jeune commissaire d'exposition née en 1983 à Vitry-sur-Seine, elle a réalisé le pavillon français à la Biennale de Venise 2019. L'œuvre qui en a résulté, "Deep Sea Blue Surrounding You" ("Vois ce bleu profond te fondre") est un voyage sensoriel et initiatique, l’épopée mystique et transfrontalière d'une douzaine de personnages, de la banlieue parisienne à la lagune vénitienne. Toutes deux passées par un parcours international, elles revendiquent la liberté que leur a apporté ce changement de paradigme et le questionnement sur les identités et les frontières qu'il entraîne. Un questionnement qui fait partie intégrante de leur proposition à la Biennale. Elles ont pourtant grandi en France : Laure Prouvost dans le Nord, une enfance campagnarde et réfractaire à l'autoritarisme du système scolaire, et Martha Kirszenbaum en région parisienne, entre classicisme versaillais et parents moins conventionnels. C'est l'Angleterre qui accueille Laure Prouvost dès ses débuts et lui remet le prix Turner. Elle devient ainsi la première française à recevoir cette prestigieuse récompense pour une œuvre qui, déjà, questionnait les frontières et les moyens de les contourner.  Pour Martha, ce sont les États-Unis qui lui offrent la possibilité de diriger un centre d'exposition, alors qu'elle manquait de modèles de femmes commissaires d'exposition dans son pays d'origine. Au-delà de ces problématiques géographiques, Laure Prouvost évoque au micro de Lauren Bastide sa propre féminité mais aussi sa mise en scène du corps féminin dans ses œuvres. Sensibles à la place des femmes et à leur représentation dans l'art, elles sont d'ailleurs toutes les deux signataires de l'appel Not suprised qui dénonce les violences sexuelles dans le monde de l'art. Un monde où les femmes peinent encore à trouver leur place et un équilibre entre vie privée et vocation. Bonne écoute, et continuez de faire parler La Poudre ! Les extraits sonores et les morceaux de Lafawndah et Flavien Berger que vous entendez dans l'épisode sont extraits de l’œuvre "Deep Sea Blue Surrounding You" ("Vois ce bleu profond te fondre"). Merci à Laure Prouvost pour son autorisation.   La Poudre est une émission produite par Nouvelles Écoutes Réalisation et générique : Aurore Meyer-Mahieu Programmation et coordination : Gaïa Marty Mixage : Clotilde Fauchille.

©2019 Nouvelles Écoutes (P)2019 Nouvelles Écoutes

Available on Audible
Cover art for El mito de las tres transformaciones [The Myth of the Three Transformations]

El mito de las tres transformaciones [The Myth of the Three Transformations]

Summary

«El que controla el pasado controla el futuro, y el que controla el presente es quien controla el pasado.» George Orwell, 1984 La historia no estudia el pasado, lo construye. Toda historia nacional es una mitología, y las mitologías sirven para estructurar la mente de un pueblo. La historia ha sido un arma, una herramienta política, un discurso psicológico, y eso es así porque siempre se ha escrito desde el poder para legitimarlo. Hoy se habla de transformaciones en la historia de México: independencia, reforma y revolución. Todas implicaron guerra, polarización y odio; cada una de ellas generó división y sembró las semillas de los conflictos posteriores. Para transformar a México, hay que tener un cambio colectivo de mentalidad, y con el bien común como premisa indispensable para encontrar la paz. El mito de las tres transformaciones es un paseo a lo largo de la historia y la psicología de nosotros mismos para lograr una verdadera transformación y construir el mejor México posible. Please note: This audiobook is in Spanish.

©2018 Juan Miguel Zunzunegui (P)2019 Penguin Random House Grupo Editorial

Length: 5 hrs and 41 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for L'evoluzione umana

L'evoluzione umana

Summary

Una storia prima della storia. Ossa fossili, denti, manufatti, siti preistorici e dati genetici per ricostruire l'evoluzione di un gruppo di scimmie antropomorfe che, intorno a 6 milioni di anni fa, in Africa, intrapresero l'intricato percorso evolutivo che diede origine alla nostra specie. È la lunga vicenda raccontata in quest'audiolibro: dalle origini, quando primati bipedi popolavano un habitat ancora forestale, alla varietà delle cosiddette "australopitecine" - fra cui la nota Lucy -, all'emergere del genere Homo, fino alla comparsa sulla scena di Homo sapiens e alla sua (nostra) affermazione sull'intero pianeta. Un percorso lungo e complesso, fondamentale per la nostra natura di esseri biologici e, al tempo stesso, culturali.

©2007 Società editrice il Mulino Spa (P)2019 Audible Studios

Narrator: Lorenzo Loreti
Length: 4 hrs and 34 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Chaldean Account of the Deluge

The Chaldean Account of the Deluge

1 rating

Summary

George Smith (1840-1876) was an English archaeologist and Assyriologist who first discovered and translated the Epic of Gilgamesh, one of the most ancient works of literature. The Babylonian account was similar to the biblical account of the Flood in Genesis. Smith discovered many more tablet fragments of the flood story, and published his work in "The Chaldean Account of Genesis".

Public Domain (P)2018 Museum Audiobooks

Narrator: Teagan McKenzie
Author: George Smith
Length: 41 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Julie Gayet

Julie Gayet

Summary

Au micro de Lauren Bastide, Julie Gayet parle du choix du nom de sa société de production, de son enfance entre Paris et banlieue, des figures de femmes de sa famille, de son passage du chant au jeu et du travail du corps. Elle évoque longuement son expérience avec Agnès Varda, mais aussi ses transformations d'actrice, la prise de conscience de sa féminité, la question du cinéma au féminin, son engagement contre les violences faites aux femmes et la ménopause. Julie Gayet est actrice et dirige la société de production Rouge international. Née en 1972 en région parisienne, elle fait du chant lyrique enfant puis, adolescente, en vient à la comédie. Son premier grand rôle au cinéma lui est offert par Agnès Varda en 1994, dans "Les Cent et une nuits de Simon Cinéma". Elle ne quittera plus les plateaux où elle se transforme de film en film, souvent méconnaissable, toujours au service de l'œuvre des réalisateurs. Elle remporte plusieurs prix pour son rôle dans "Sélect Hôtel" en 1997, ainsi que le César de la meilleure actrice dans un second rôle en 2014 pour "Quai d'Orsay". En 2007, elle monte sa société de production, Rouge international qui produit des films et documentaires engagés et créatifs, comme "Grave" de Julia Ducournau ou "Visages Villages" d’Agnès Varda et JR. Julie Gayet milite aussi contre les violences faites aux femmes. Elle fait partie du collectif 5050x2020, du mouvement #Maintenantonagit pour récolter des fonds pour les associations de terrain et est cofondatrice de l'association Info-endométriose qui travaille à la reconnaissance de cette maladie. La voix que vous entendez dans l'introduction est celle d’Agnès Varda dans un entretien pour Télérama Dialogue.   La Poudre est une production Nouvelles Écoutes Réalisation et générique : Aurore Meyer-Mahieu Mixage du générique du cycle Cinéma : Charles de Cillia Coordination : Gaïa Marty.

©2019 Nouvelles Écoutes (P)2019 Nouvelles Écoutes

Length: 1 hr and 6 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Saxons, Vikings, and Celts

Saxons, Vikings, and Celts

4 ratings

Summary

WASPs finally get their due in this stimulating history by one of the world's leading geneticists. Saxons, Vikings, and Celts is the most illuminating book yet to be written about the genetic history of Britain and Ireland. Through a systematic, 10-year DNA survey of more than 10,000 volunteers, Bryan Sykes has traced the true genetic makeup of British Islanders and their descendants. This historical travelogue and genetic tour of the fabled isles, which includes accounts of the Roman invasions and Norman conquests, takes listeners from the Pontnewydd cave in North Wales, where a 300,000-year-old tooth was discovered, to the resting place of "The Red Lady" of Paviland, whose anatomically modern body was dyed with ochre by her grieving relatives nearly 29,000 years ago. A perfect work for anyone interested in the genealogy of England, Scotland, or Ireland, Saxons, Vikings, and Celts features a chapter specifically addressing the genetic makeup of those people in the United States who have descended from the British Isles.

©2006 Bryan Sykes (P)2006 Tantor

Narrator: Dick Hill
Author: Bryan Sykes
Length: 10 hrs and 9 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for It All Adds Up: The Story of People and Mathematics

It All Adds Up: The Story of People and Mathematics

3 ratings

Summary

The international best seller. A brief history of the mathematical ideas that have forever changed the world and the everyday people and pioneers behind them. Full of anthropological insights, amazing anecdotes and theory, It All Adds Up charts the story of our best invention yet. From our ability to calculate the passing of time to the algorithms that control our computers and much else in our lives, numbers are everywhere. They are so indispensable that we forget just how fundamental they are to our way of life. In this international best seller, Mickaël Launay mixes history and anecdotes from around the world to reveal how mathematics became pivotal to the story of humankind. It is a journey into numbers, with Launay as a guide. In museums, monuments or train stations, he uses the objects around us to explain what art can reveal about geometry, how Babylonian scholars developed one of the first complex mathematical languages and how ‘Arabic’ numbers were adopted from India. It All Adds Up also tells the story of how mapping the trajectory of an eclipse has helped to trace back one of the oldest battles in history, down to its day, how the course of the modern-day Greenwich Meridian was established and the fact that negative numbers were accepted just last century. This audiobook is a vital compendium of the great men and women of mathematics from Aristotle to Ada Lovelace, which demonstrates how this discipline shaped the written word and world. With clarity, passion and wisdom, the author unveils the unexpected and at times serendipitous ways in which big mathematical ideas were created; supporting the belief that - just like music or literature - maths should be accessible to everyone, Launay gives listeners a newfound fondness for the numbers that surround us and the rich stories they contain.

©2018 Mickael Launay (P)2018 HarperCollins Publishers

Length: 7 hrs and 12 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Almost Human

Almost Human

4 ratings

Summary

A story of defiance and determination by a controversial scientist, this is Lee Berger's own take on finding Homo naledi, an all-new species on the human family tree and one of the greatest discoveries of the 21st century. In 2013, Lee Berger, a National Geographic explorer-in-residence, heard of a cache of bones in a hard-to-reach underground cave in South Africa. He put out a call around the world for petite collaborators - men and women small and adventurous enough to be able to squeeze through eight-inch tunnels to reach a sunless cave forty feet underground. With this team, Berger made the discovery of a lifetime: hundreds of prehistoric bones, including entire skeletons of at least 15 individuals, all perhaps two million years old. Their features combined those of known prehominids like Lucy, the famous Australopithecus, with those more human than anything ever before seen in prehistoric remains. Berger's team had discovered an all new species, and they called it Homo naledi. The cave quickly proved to be the richest prehominid site ever discovered, full of implications that shake the very foundation of how we define what makes us human. Did this species come before, during, or after the emergence of Homo sapiens on our evolutionary tree? How did the cave come to contain nothing but the remains of these individuals? Did they bury their dead? If so, they must have had a level of self-knowledge, including an awareness of death. And yet those are the very characteristics used to define what makes us human. Did an equally advanced species inhabit Earth with us, or before us? Berger does not hesitate to address all these questions. Some colleagues question Berger's interpretation of this and other finds. Here, this charismatic and visionary paleontologist counters their arguments and tells his personal story: a rich narrative about science, exploration, and what it means to be human.

©2017 Lee Berger (P)2018 Blackstone Publishing

Narrator: Donald Corren
Length: 6 hrs and 34 mins
Available on Audible
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Anuta, Second Edition

Summary

Revised to stimulate and engage an undergraduate student audience, Richard Feinberg's updated account of Anuta opens with a chapter on his varied experiences when he initially undertook fieldwork in this tiny, isolated Polynesian community in the Solomon Islands. He explores dominant cultural features, including language, kinship, marriage, politics, and religion topics that align with subject matter covered in introductory anthropology courses and he looks at some of the challenges Anutans face in the 21st century. Like many other peoples living on small, remote islands, Anutans strive to maintain traditional values while at the same time becoming involved in the world market economy. In all, Feinberg gives listeners magnificent material for studying the relations between demography, environment, culture, and society in this changing world. The book is published by Kent State University Press.

©2011 Richard Feinberg (P)2017 Redwood Audiobooks

Narrator: Erin C Gray
Length: 11 hrs and 8 mins
Available on Audible
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Im Grunde gut

1 rating

Summary

Der Historiker und Journalist Rutger Bregman setzt sich in seinem neuen Buch mit dem Wesen des Menschen auseinander. Anders als in der westlichen Denktradition angenommen ist der Mensch seinen Thesen nach nicht böse, sondern im Gegenteil: von Grund auf gut. Und geht man von dieser Prämisse aus, ist es möglich, die Welt und den Menschen in ihr komplett neu und grundoptimistisch zu denken. In seinem mitreißend geschriebenen, überzeugenden Buch präsentiert Bregman Ideen für die Verbesserung der Welt. Sie sind innovativ und mutig und stimmen vor allem hoffnungsfroh.

©2020 Rowohlt Verlag GmbH, Hamburg. Übersetzung von Ulrich Faure und Gerd Busse (P)2020 Argon Verlag GmbH, Berlin

Narrator: Julian Mehne
Length: 13 hrs and 15 mins
Available on Audible
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The Social Conquest of Earth

4 ratings

Summary

Edward O. Wilson is one of the world’s preeminent biologists, a Pulitzer Prize winner, and the author of more than 25 books. The defining work in a remarkable career, The Social Conquest of Earth boldly addresses age-old questions (Where did we come from? What are we? Where are we going?) while delving into the biological sources of morality, religion, and the creative arts.

©2012 Edward O. Wilson (P)2012 Recorded Books. LLC

Narrator: Jonathan Hogan
Length: 10 hrs and 29 mins
Available on Audible
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Natasha's Dance

3 ratings

Summary

History on a grand scale - an enchanting masterpiece that explores the making of one of the world's most vibrant civilizations. A People's Tragedy, wrote Eric Hobsbawm, did 'more to help us understand the Russian Revolution than any other book I know'. Now, in Natasha's Dance, internationally renowned historian Orlando Figes does the same for Russian culture, summoning the myriad elements that formed a nation and held it together.   Beginning in the 18th century with the building of St. Petersburg - a 'window on the West' - and culminating with the challenges posed to Russian identity by the Soviet regime, Figes examines how writers, artists and musicians grappled with the idea of Russia itself - its character, spiritual essence and destiny.  He skillfully interweaves the great works - by Dostoevsky, Stravinsky, and Chagall - with folk embroidery, peasant songs, religious icons and all the customs of daily life, from food and drink to bathing habits to beliefs about the spirit world.  Figes' characters range high and low: the revered Tolstoy, who left his deathbed to search for the kingdom of God, as well as the serf girl Praskovya, who became Russian opera's first superstar and shocked society by becoming her owner's wife.   Like the European-schooled countess Natasha performing an impromptu folk dance in Tolstoy's War and Peace, the spirit of 'Russianness' is revealed by Figes as rich and uplifting, complex and contradictory - a powerful force that unified a vast country and proved more lasting than any Russian ruler or state.

©2018 Orlando Figes (P)2018 Audible, Ltd

Narrator: Ric Jerrom
Length: 29 hrs and 23 mins
Available on Audible
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Traveling Heavy

Summary

Traveling Heavy is a deeply moving, unconventional memoir by master storyteller and cultural anthropologist Ruth Behar. Through evocative stories, she portrays her life as an immigrant child and later as an adult woman who loves to travel but is terrified of boarding a plane. With an open heart, she writes about her Yiddish-Sephardic-Cuban-American family as well as the strangers who show her kindness as she makes her way through the world. Compassionate, curious, and unafraid to reveal her failings, Behar embraces the unexpected insights and adventures of travel, whether it's learning that she longed to become a mother after being accused of giving the evil eye to a baby in rural Mexico or going on a zany pilgrimage to the Behar World Summit in the Spanish town of Béjar. Behar calls herself an anthropologist who specializes in homesickness. Repeatedly returning to her homeland of Cuba, unwilling to utter her last good-bye, she is obsessed with the question of why we leave home to find home. For those of us who travel heavy with our own baggage, Behar is an indispensable guide, full of grace and hope in the perpetual search for connection that defines our humanity. The book is published by Duke University Press.

©2013 Ruth Behar (P)2015 Redwood Audiobooks

Narrator: Sally Martin
Author: Ruth Behar
Length: 8 hrs and 18 mins
Available on Audible
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Before the Dawn

3 ratings

Summary

Based on a groundbreaking synthesis of recent scientific findings, critically acclaimed New York Times science reporter Nicholas Wade tells a bold and provocative new story of the history of our ancient ancestors and the evolution of human nature. Just in the last three years, a flood of new scientific findings, driven by revelations discovered in the human genome, has provided compelling new answers to many long-standing mysteries about our most ancient ancestors, the people who first evolved in Africa and then went on to colonize the whole world. Nicholas Wade weaves this host of news-making findings together for the first time into an intriguing new history of the human story before the dawn of civilization. Sure to stimulate lively controversy, he makes the case for novel arguments about many hotly debated issues such as the evolution of language and race and the genetic roots of human nature, and reveals that human evolution has continued even to today. In wonderfully lively and lucid prose, Wade reveals the answers that researchers have ingeniously developed to so many puzzles: When did language emerge? When and why did we start to wear clothing? How did our ancestors break out of Africa and defeat the more physically powerful Neanderthals who stood in their way? Why did the different races evolve, and why did we come to speak so many different languages? When did we learn to live with animals and where and when did we domesticate man's first animal companions, dogs? How did human nature change during the 35,000 years between the emergence of fully modern humans and the first settlements? This will be the most talked about science book of the season.

©2006 Nicholas Wade (P)2006 Tantor Media Inc

Narrator: Alan Sklar
Length: 12 hrs and 49 mins
Available on Audible
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The Life and Afterlife of Harry Houdini

1 rating

Summary

Joe Posnanski enters the colorful world of Harry Houdini and his legions of devoted fans to explore the illusionist’s impact on global culture - and why his legacy endures to this day.  Nearly a century after Harry Houdini died on Halloween in 1926, he feels as modern and alive as ever. The name Houdini still leaps to mind whenever we witness a daring escape. The baby who frees herself from her crib? Houdini. The dog who vanishes and reappears in the neighbor’s garden? Houdini. Every generation produces new disciples of the magician, from household names in magic like David Copperfield and David Blaine to countless other followers whose lives have been transformed by the power of Houdini. In rural Pennsylvania, a 13-year-old girl finds the courage to leave a violent home after learning that Houdini ran away to join the circus; she eventually becomes the first female magician to saw a man in half on television. In Australia, an eight-year-old boy with a learning impediment feels worthless until he sees an old poster of Houdini advertising “Nothing on earth can hold Houdini prisoner” and begins his path to becoming that nation’s most popular magician. In California, an actor and Vietnam War veteran finds purpose in his life by uncovering the secrets of his hero.  But the unique phenomenon of Houdini was always more than his death-defying stunts or his ability to escape handcuffs and straitjackets. It is also about the power of imagination and self-invention. His incredible transformation from Ehrich Weiss, humble Hungarian immigrant and rabbi’s son, into the self-named Harry Houdini has won him a slice of immortality. No one has withstood the test of time quite like Houdini. Fueled by Posnanski’s personal obsession with the magician - and magic itself - The Life and Afterlife of Harry Houdini is a poignant odyssey of discovery, blending biography, memoir, and first-person reporting to trace Houdini’s metamorphosis into an iconic figure who has inspired millions. 

©2019 Joe Posnanski (P)2019 Simon & Schuster Audio

Narrator: Jacques Roy
Length: 9 hrs and 24 mins
Available on Audible
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The Hidden Life of Life

Summary

An iconoclast and best-selling author of both nonfiction and fiction, Elizabeth Marshall Thomas has spent a lifetime observing, thinking, and writing about the cultures of animals such as lions, wolves, dogs, deer, and humans. In this engrossing book, she provides a plainspoken, big-picture look at the commonality of life on our planet, from the littlest microbes to the largest lizards.  Inspired by the idea of symbiosis in evolution - that all living things evolve in a series of cooperative relationships - Thomas leads listeners on a journey through the progression of life. Along the way she shares the universal likenesses, experiences, and environments of “Gaia’s creatures,” from amoebas in plant soil to the pets we love, from proud primates to Homo sapiens hunter-gatherers on the African savanna. Fervently rejecting “anthropodenial,” the notion that nonhuman life does not share characteristics with humans, Thomas instead shows that paramecia can learn, plants can communicate, humans aren’t really as special as we think we are - and that it doesn’t take a scientist to marvel at the smallest inhabitants of the natural world and their connections to all living things.   A unique voice on anthropology and animal behavior, Thomas challenges scientific convention and the jargon that prevents us all from understanding all living things better. Narrated by Thomas, this joyful book is a fascinating look at the challenges and behaviors shared by creatures from bacteria to larvae to parasitic fungi, a potted hyacinth to the author herself, and all those in between.  Elizabeth Marshall Thomas, an anthropologist and animal behaviorist, has published thirteen previous books, including the New York Times best seller The Hidden Life of Dogs. She lives in Peterborough, New Hampshire. Learn more at elizabethmarshallthomas.net.

©2018 Penn State University Press (P)2020 Penn State University Press

Length: 7 hrs and 19 mins
Available on Audible
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Scimmie

Summary

Rompere una noce con un sasso, lavare e salare le patate, fare un bagno in acque termali... sono loro: le scimmie. Ecco perché occuparsene, anche se hanno quattro mani e non solo due. L'audiolibro ci guida attraverso un viaggio nel mondo dei Primati, per aiutarci ad afferrarne la complessità e il fascino, ma anche per provare a capire in quale misura siamo noi stessi un po' scimmie e, dunque, a tutti gli effetti parte della natura. Ci accorgeremo, allora, che molti dei nostri comportamenti - compresi quelli più sofisticati - sono modulazioni di caratteristiche piuttosto diffuse tra i nostri parenti più stretti.

©2011 Società editrice il Mulino Spa (P)2019 Audible Studios

Narrator: Marco Balbi
Length: 5 hrs and 18 mins
Available on Audible
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Why We Remain Jews

Summary

In Why We Remain Jews, Dr. Vladimir Tsesis describes the path he traversed from religious ignorance to strong belief in the Jewish religion. Tsesis assigns a special place to the proof of his conclusion that religion and science - especially in light of recent discoveries - are not antagonists but are in fact in complete harmony, supplementing and not excluding each other. In the spirit of ecumenism, Tsesis speaks about coexistence of different religions, which share the common objective of assurance of perpetual survival of the human race. The unifying theme of this audiobook, however, is the beauty of the Jewish religion and a possible answer to the question of why we remain Jews.

©2013 Vladimir Tsesis (P)2014 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

Narrator: Robert Scott
Length: 7 hrs and 55 mins
Available on Audible
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Sarah Ourahmoune

Summary

Au micro de Lauren Bastide, Sarah Ourahmoune parle de son enfance à Clichy, du sport comme valeur fondamentale et de son premier contact avec la boxe. Elle évoque aussi la situation des femmes dans ce sport à ses débuts, son premier combat, comment s'imposer dans le milieu sportif et son rapport à son corps. Elle témoigne enfin de la difficulté de la reprise après la maternité, de la puissance d'un corps de sportive de 34 ans et de son rôle dans la société. Sarah Ourahmoune est la boxeuse la plus médaillée de France. Dix fois championne de France, trois fois championne d'Europe, championne du monde en 2008 et médaille d'argent aux Jeux Olympiques de Rio en 2016, elle commence la boxe à 14 ans à Aubervilliers, alors que la compétition n'était pas encore autorisée aux femmes. Née en 1982, elle gagne sa première médaille en 1999, peu de temps après l'ouverture de l'accès à la compétition. En dehors de son impressionnant palmarès de boxe, elle a une formation d'éducatrice spécialisée et poursuit des études à Sciences Po où elle développe son entreprise : Boxer inside. Elle y utilise la boxe comme moyen de développement personnel et forme des publics divers, notamment en entreprise. Engagée politiquement, elle fait aujourd'hui partie du Comité national olympique et sportif français en charge des mixités et est une des porte-parole des Jeux Olympiques de 2024.   La Poudre est une production Nouvelles Écoutes Réalisation et générique : Aurore Meyer-Mahieu Coordination : Gaïa Marty Mixage : Audrey Ginestet.

©2019 Nouvelles Écoutes (P)2019 Nouvelles Écoutes

Length: 1 hr and 15 mins
Available on Audible
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Hey, America, Your Roots Are Showing

Summary

You've heard of the Dog Whisperer? Meet the Ancestor Rescuer. Part forensic scientist, part master sleuth, Megan Smolenyak has solved some of America's oldest and most fascinating genealogical mysteries. You've read the headlines; now get the inside story as the "Indiana Jones of genealogy" reveals how she cracked her news-making cases, became the face of this increasingly popular field - and redefined history along the way. How did Smolenyak discover Barack Obama's Irish ancestry - and his relation to Brad Pitt? Or the journey of Michelle Obama's family from slavery to the White House? Or the startling links between outspoken politicians Al Sharpton and Strom Thurmond? And why is Smolenyak's name squared? Test your own skills as she shares her exciting secrets. Whether she's scouring websites to uncover the surprising connections between famous figures or using cutting-edge DNA tests to locate family members of fallen soldiers dating back to the Civil War, Smolenyak's historical sleuthing is as provocative, richly layered, and exciting as America itself.

©2012 Megan Smolenyak (P)2014 Audible Inc.

Narrator: Gwen Hughes
Length: 8 hrs and 44 mins
Available on Audible
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The Undivided Past

Summary

From one of our most acclaimed historians comes an account of human solidarity throughout the ages, provocatively arguing against the received wisdom that history is best understood as a chronicle of groups in conflict. Investigating the six most pervasive categories of human difference - religion, nation, class, gender, race, and civilization - Cannadine asks how determinative each of them has really been over the course of history. Without denying their power to motivate populations dramatically at particular moments, he reveals that in the long term none has proven remotely as divisive as the occasional absolutist cries of "us versus them" would suggest, whether Christian versus Muslim during the Crusades (and now), landed gentry versus peasantry during the Bolshevik Revolution, or Jews versus "Aryan race" in Nazi Germany. For most of recorded time, these same "unbridgeable" differences were experienced as just one identity among others; whatever most chroniclers, self-serving mythmakers, and demagogues would have us believe, history needs to be reimagined to include the countless fruitful interactions across these lines, which are usually left out of the picture.

©2013 David Cannadine (P)2013 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

Narrator: Gildart Jackson
Length: 12 hrs and 21 mins
Available on Audible
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The Last of the Tribe

Summary

Throughout the centuries, the Amazon has yielded many of its secrets, but it still holds a few great mysteries. In 1996 experts got their first glimpse of one: a lone Indian, a tribe of one, hidden in the forests of Southwestern Brazil. Previously uncontacted tribes are extremely rare, but a one-man tribe was unprecedented. And like all of the isolated tribes in the Amazonian frontier, he was in danger. Resentment of Indians can run high among settlers, and the consequences can be fatal. The discovery of the Indian prevented local ranchers from seizing his land and led a small group of men who believed that he was the last of a murdered tribe to dedicate themselves to protecting him. These men worked for the government, overseeing indigenous interests in an odd job that was part Indiana Jones, part social worker, and were among the most experienced adventurers in the Amazon. They were a motley crew that included a rebel who spent more than a decade living with a tribe, a young man who left home to work in the forest at age 14, and an old-school sertanista with a collection of tall tales amassed over five decades of jungle exploration. Their quest would prove far more difficult than any of them could imagine. Over the course of a decade, the struggle to save the Indian and his land would pit them against businessmen, politicians, and even the Indian himself, a man resolved to keep the outside world at bay at any cost. It would take them into the farthest reaches of the forest and to the halls of Brazil's Congress, threatening their jobs and even their lives. Ensuring the future of the Indian and his land would lead straight to the heart of the conflict over the Amazon itself. A heart-pounding modern-day adventure set in one of the world's last truly wild places, The Last of the Tribe is a riveting, brilliantly told tale of encountering the unknown and the unfathomable - and the value of preserving it.

©2016 Monte Reel (P)2016 Random House Audio

Narrator: Mark Bramhall
Author: Monte Reel
Length: 9 hrs
Available on Audible
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Red

2 ratings

Summary

The mere mention of red hair conjures vivid images and provokes strong reactions. Popular stereotypes of redheaded women range from the fiery-tempered vixen and the penitent prostitute - Mary Magdalene is often portrayed in art as a redhead - to the fun-loving scatterbrain Lucille Ball. Red-haired men, meanwhile, are consistently associated with either the savage barbarian or the redheaded clown. But why? Red: A History of the Redhead is the first audiobook to chronicle red hair and redheadedness from prehistory to present day. As both intrepid cultural detective and compelling storyteller, Jacky Colliss Harvey weaves a fascinating history beginning with the moment the redheaded gene made its way out of Africa with the early human diaspora. She goes on to trace red hair in the ancient world; the intolerance manifested against it as an indicator of Jewishness across medieval Europe; red hair as the height of fashion in Renaissance England; the redheaded "stunner" in Pre-Raphaelite art and the paintings of the Impressionists; and into the modern age, from its symbolism and adoration in popular culture to "gingerism", perhaps the last unacknowledged from of discrimination. More than an audiobook for redheads, Red is both an exploration of red hair as "other" and a celebration of every aspect of its unique social and scientific heritage at a time when it has never before been so frequently in the news or played such a prominent role in our visual culture.

©2015 Jacky Colliss Harvey (P)2015 Hachette Audio

Length: 6 hrs and 36 mins
Available on Audible
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Uomini e ambienti

Summary

Come ha avuto origine Homo sapiens? In che modo alcune popolazioni si sono adattate ai climi caldi, altre al freddo e altre ancora all'alta quota? Perché alcuni difetti genetici permettono di sopravvivere meglio in certe condizioni? Come possiamo interagire con l'ambiente per ricavarne il cibo necessario in modo sostenibile? Attraverso un'incursione nella biodiversità umana, nell'audiolibro si affronta la varietà delle strategie biologiche e culturali con cui la nostra specie si è potuta adattare ai diversi ambienti, talvolta trasformandoli anche profondamente in rapporto alle proprie esigenze. Alimentazione, clima e complessi patogeni sono le tre grandi sfide che abbiamo dovuto affrontare; a queste abbiamo risposto con strategie adattative di natura genetica, fisiologica e culturale, che ci hanno consentito di giungere sin qui.

©2009 Società editrice il Mulino Spa (P)2019 Audible Studios

Length: 4 hrs and 28 mins
Available on Audible
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Lords of the Horizons

2 ratings

Summary

The Ottoman Empire has long exerted a strong pull on Western minds and hearts. For over 600 years the empire swelled and declined, rising from a dusty fiefdom in the foothills of Anatolia to a power which ruled over the Danube and the Euphrates with the richest court in Europe. But its decline was prodigious, protracted and total.

©1998 Jason Goodwin (P)2018 Audible, Ltd

Narrator: Grahame Edwards
Length: 12 hrs and 42 mins
Available on Audible
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Any Ordinary Day

2 ratings

Summary

As a journalist, Leigh Sales often encounters people experiencing the worst moments of their lives in the full glare of the media. But one particular string of bad news stories - and a terrifying brush with her own mortality - sent her looking for answers about how vulnerable each of us is to a life-changing event. What are our chances of actually experiencing one? What do we fear most and why? And when the worst does happen, what comes next? In this wise and layered audiobook, Leigh talks intimately with people who've faced the unimaginable, from terrorism to natural disaster to simply being in the wrong place at the wrong time. Expecting broken lives, she instead finds strength, hope, even humour. Leigh brilliantly condenses the cutting-edge research on the way the human brain processes fear and grief, and poses the questions we too often ignore out of awkwardness. Along the way, she offers an unguarded account of her own challenges and what she's learned about coping with life's unexpected blows. Warm, candid and empathetic, this audiobook is about what happens when ordinary people, on ordinary days, are forced to suddenly find the resilience most of us don't know we have.

©2018 Leigh Sales (P)2018 Penguin Random House Australia

Narrator: Leigh Sales
Author: Leigh Sales
Length: 6 hrs and 29 mins
Available on Audible
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Homo dieteticus

Summary

Siamo entrati nell'era di Homo dieteticus. Crudisti, sushisti, vegetariani, vegani, gluten free, no carb: fra etica e dietetica la ricerca del modello alimentare virtuoso è diventata la nuova religione globale. E come tutte le religioni nascenti produce continue contrapposizioni, scismi, eresie, sette, abiure. Ciascun credo si ritiene l'unica via verso la salvezza. E verso l'immortalità. O almeno quel suo succedaneo salutistico che chiamiamo longevità. Così anticipiamo il giorno del giudizio e facciamo del dietologo una sorta di Dio giudice. O di Dio una sorta di dietologo improprio, che dispensa premi e castighi qui e ora. Ecco perché la dieta non è più una misura di benessere, ma una condizione dell'essere.

©2015 Società editrice il Mulino Spa (P)2020 Audible Studios

Author: Marino Niola
Length: 3 hrs and 52 mins
Available on Audible