Cover art for New Zealand Travel Guide: The 30 Best Tips for Your Trip to New Zealand

New Zealand Travel Guide: The 30 Best Tips for Your Trip to New Zealand

1 rating

Summary

Make your journey to New Zealand the best possible The adventure capital of the world, land of black sand beaches, windswept lakes, white snow-capped mountains, forests, misty fjords, tectonic volcanoes, and an incredible cultural heritage - New Zealand is currently topping every traveler's wish list. If this is your first time in this beautiful country, you should plan your trip in detail. If not, you most certainly will miss out on some of the best places to be and things to see.  This book will help you to make the most out of your time in New Zealand. You will get to know the most fascinating things to do and see in Oakland, Rotorua, Wellington, and Auckland, to name a few of the most beautiful locations. Here is a preview of the tips you will get in this audiobook: Culture and lifestyle in New Zealand What you need to know about the Maori Beautiful Bay of Islands The most famous cities Much, much more! Get this audiobook now!

©2017 Traveling the World (P)2017 Traveling the World

Narrator: Ronald Fox
Length: 1 hr and 3 mins
Available on Audible
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Squashed Possums

Summary

2016 Award Finalist - Travel Non-Fiction - Readers' Favorite Awards "Terrific." (Bill Bryson, author of Notes from a Small Island) Ten years after returning from the New Zealand outback, Jon receives a mysterious manuscript in the post. Narrated by Jon's former home, the lone caravan, Squashed Possums reveals what it's like to live in the wild through four seasons, including New Zealand's coldest winter in decades.  Discover how Jon finds himself reversing off the edge of a cliff, meet the Maori chef who survived 9/11, the pioneers who paved the way, and catch sight of the elusive kiwi bird. Encounter hedgehogs that fly, possums that scream, and perhaps most importantly, the lone caravan with a story to tell.... "I thoroughly enjoyed it! What an interesting story." (Dr. Jock Phillips, NZ historian and author) “The caravan narrator - yes, a first. May it sell in the millions.” (Giles Milton, author of White Gold and Nathaniel's Nutmeg) 

©2015 Jonathan Tindale (P)2018 Jonathan Tindale

Narrator: Matthew Lyon
Length: 4 hrs and 48 mins
Available on Audible
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Kamikaze Kangaroos!

1 rating

Summary

Tony James Slater knew nothing about Australia. Except for the fact that he'd just arrived there. The stage is set for an outrageous adventure: three people, one van, on an epic, 20,000-mile road trip around Australia. What could possibly go wrong? Of course, the van - nicknamed "Rusty" - is a crumbling wreck, held together by the world's most garish paint job. They're crisscrossing the continent through some of the most inhospitable land on the planet - the infamous Aussie Outback. And isn't there something about Australian animals being...well, you know, kind of dangerous? Unprepared, underqualified, and hopelessly inept, Tony battles gigantic pumpkins, mechanical mishaps, and suicidal kangaroos, armed only with a thong and a sense of humor. His companions struggle to keep him safe while climbing in drag, snowboarding off cliffs, and hiking hundreds of miles through the bush. One thing's for sure; this "adventure of a lifetime" - if they survive it - is something they're never going to forget. So, scull those stubbies! Grab your galahs! And put down that platypus. Look out, Australiat! There's an idiot coming....

©2014 Tony James Slater (P)2018 Tantor

Narrator: Tim Campbell
Length: 11 hrs and 5 mins
Available on Audible
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The Burden Within

Summary

This is a true story. Join me as I recount my torturous years of schooling and early adult life in England. Be inspired by my adventures as a '10 Pound Pom' drifting through Australia during the 1960s and 1970s.

©2017 Christopher Thompson (P)2017 Christopher Thompson

Length: 19 hrs and 53 mins
Available on Audible
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Outer Island

Summary

Lovers of fine travel and adventure relish Scott Smith’s rich tale as a Peace Corps volunteer. Smith’s keen observations never sag in human interest as he confronts living on the edge of Pacific island paradise. It is a must listen for island lovers and anyone considering a journey to change the world or themselves.   A heart-warming memoir from a Peace Corps volunteer on the outer edge of Pacific island paradise.  Scott D. Smith returned from Micronesia and went onto Medill and a career as a reporter and writer for newspapers and magazines. He taught in a jail in Chicago and works as a public information officer in Minnesota. 

©2019 Scott Smith (P)2020 Scott Smith

Narrator: Jon Hegge
Length: 5 hrs and 51 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for New Zealand: Cities, Sights and Other Places You Need to Visit

New Zealand: Cities, Sights and Other Places You Need to Visit

Summary

From the dynamics of Maori culture and tradition to the majestic creation of nature, New Zealand is the sublime destination to which every traveler is looking forward. New Zealand is bigger than UK and has just 4.8 million inhabitants. Thus, the remaining areas are filled with fjords, lakes, beaches, walking trails, reserved area, forests, and much more. Do not get hung up on the idea that it is just a tiny island close to Australia. This place has wonders in its pocket starting from water activities to helicopter rides to volcanoes. Visit the winery or sky dive from the tallest building in the country. Do you want to go to the spot where the Lord of the Rings movie happened? Catch a flight to New Zealand.  This audiobook talks in detail about this small piece of land that drifted into the Pacific Ocean during continental drift. Everything you need to know about each city in the country is explained in detail with no bias. When you download New Zealand: Cities, Sights and Other Places You Need to Visit, you will be well-prepared to visit the country of your dreams! Buy this audiobook today! Would you like to start today? If you do, just scroll up and hit the "Buy Now" button.  Enjoy!

©2018 Writing Souls' Travel Guides (P)2018 Writing Souls' Travel Guides

Length: 1 hr and 23 mins
Available on Audible
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Peanut Butter and Passports

1 rating

Summary

Tom Gose brings listeners along on his travels to various places around the world. Starting with a trip to Hawaii, he recounts trips to Peru, Bolivia, Cuba, Canada, New Zealand, and Ireland smoothly weaving his comedic narrative on practically every aspect of traveling. The book includes:  What it is like to run off of a cliff?  The numerous downsides to the front wheel of your bike falling off while cruising downhill  The awesome spectacle that is "people-watching"  Why it is so difficult to avoid laughing at times when you really want to  Why drivers once saw the head of an ape behind the steering wheel of a car on the highway  Tom Gose dives into the absurdities involved with traveling and all of the truly entertaining views of people he met and saw along the way.  The stories of his travels are melded with entertaining life experiences that impacted his decision-making process throughout the adventures. The book balances “laugh-out-loud” humor with respectful views of other cultures and explains why traveling is so important to developing a well-rounded view of the world and the people you share it with.

©2018 Tom Gose (P)2018 Tom Gose

Narrator: Tom Gose
Author: Tom Gose
Length: 5 hrs and 37 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Greater Than a Tourist - Wellington, North Island, New Zealand

Greater Than a Tourist - Wellington, North Island, New Zealand

Summary

Are you excited about planning your next trip? Do you want to try something new? Would you like some guidance from a local?  If you answered yes to any of these questions, then this Greater Than a Tourist audiobook is for you. Greater Than a Tourist - Wellington, North Island, New Zealand by Leigh Hogle offers the inside scoop on Wellington.  Most travel books tell you how to travel like a tourist. Although there is nothing wrong with that, as part of the Greater Than a Tourist series, this book will give you travel tips from someone who has lived at your next travel destination.  In this audiobook, you will discover advice that will help you throughout your stay. This audiobook will not tell you exact addresses or store hours but instead will give you excitement and knowledge from a local that you may not find in other smaller travel books.  Travel like a local. Slow down, stay in one place, and get to know the people and the culture. By the time you finish this audiobook, you will be eager and prepared to travel to your destination.

©2018 CZYK Publishing (P)2019 CZYK Publishing

Narrator: Jason Zenobia
Length: 1 hr and 43 mins
Available on Audible
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Dirty Chick

6 ratings

Summary

"One month into our stay, we'd managed to dispatch most of our charges. We executed the chickens. One of the cats disappeared, clearly disgusted with our urban ways. And Lucky [the cow] was escaping almost daily. It seemed we didn't have much of a talent for farming. And we still had eleven months to go." Antonia Murphy, you might say, is an unlikely farmer. Born and bred in San Francisco, she spent much of her life as a liberal urban cliché, and her interactions with the animal kingdom rarely extended past dinner. But then she became a mother. And when her eldest son was born with a rare, mysterious genetic condition, she and her husband, Peter, decided it was time to slow down and find a supportive community. So the Murphys moved to Purua, New Zealand - a rural area where most residents maintained private farms, complete with chickens, goats, and (this being New Zealand) sheep. The result was a comic disaster, and when one day their son had a medical crisis, it was also a little bit terrifying. Dirty Chick chronicles Antonia's first year of life as an artisan farmer. Having bought into the myth that farming is a peaceful, fulfilling endeavor that allows one to commune with nature and live the way humans were meant to live, Antonia soon realized that the reality is far dirtier and way more disgusting than she ever imagined. Among the things she learned the hard way: Cows are prone to a number of serious bowel ailments, goat mating involves an astounding amount of urine, and roosters are complete and unredeemable assholes. But for all its traumas, Antonia quickly embraced farm life, getting drunk on homemade wine (it doesn't cause hangovers!), making cheese (except for the cat hair, it's a tremendously satisfying hobby), and raising a baby lamb (which was addictively cute until it grew into a sheep).

©2015 Antonia Murphy (P)2014 Audible Inc.

Narrator: Antonia Murphy
Length: 7 hrs and 20 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for TripAdvisor: The Top Travel Destinations in the Oceana Region

TripAdvisor: The Top Travel Destinations in the Oceana Region

Summary

The human body is comprised of over 80 percent water. Therefore, it should be no surprise that we are drawn endlessly to bodies of this life-giving fluid. Oceana calls to us endlessly, drawing us in, enfolding us in its depths. In this guide, you will find the most comprehensive directory available on oceanic regions, from the United States to Australia. Complete with suggested activities and clear cut directions, this guide is a must for all water babies seeking adventure!

©2017 Proxy Publishing (P)2018 Proxy Publishing

Narrator: Rachel Brandt
Author: Steven Kozak
Length: 6 mins
Available on Audible
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The Art of Free Travel

Summary

Patrick, Meg and their family had built a happy, sustainable life in regional Victoria. But in late 2013, they found themselves craving an adventure: a road trip. But theirs was a road trip with a difference. With Zephyr (10), Woody (1) and Zero, their Jack Russell, they set off on an epic 6,000km yearlong cycling journey along Australia’s east coast, from Daylesford to Cape York and back. Their aim was to live as cheaply as possible - guerrilla camping, hunting, foraging and bartering their permaculture skills, and living on a diet of free food, bush tucker, and the occasional fresh road kill. They spent time in Aboriginal communities, joined an antifracking blockade, documented edible plants, and dodged speeding cars and trucks on the country’s most dangerous highways. The Art of Free Travel is the remarkable story of a rule-breaking year of ethical living.

©2015 Patrick Jones and Meg Ulman (P)2015 Audible, Ltd

Length: 6 hrs and 15 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Ultimate Guide to the Great Barrier Reef

The Ultimate Guide to the Great Barrier Reef

Summary

The Ultimate Guide to the Great Barrier Reef  This travel guide of the magnificent Great Barrier Reef contains detailed tips on how to make the most of one of the most remarkable traveling destinations in the world. This travel guide is comprehensive and includes a stunning description of one of the seven natural wonders of the world and perhaps the most popular tourist spot.  Many people conjure up the images of azure waters teeming with colorful corals of every shape and size accompanied by multicolored fish when they think of the Great Barrier Reef. However, this book reveals that this marvelous place has much more to offer. The reef has been built by various natural phenomena taking place during the course of history, and it is a complex and massive ecosystem. The book takes tourists to the famous diving sites in and near the reef and reveals the extraordinary Queensland, which combines with islands and diving sites to form this fabulously stunning water world.  The book also introduces the unique flora and fauna that reside in this part of the world, and travelers can learn more about the life on reef as well. This book is, in fact, an ultimate guide to one of the world's most treasured natural assets, and it also provides some tips about how to maximize your pleasure while visiting the reef. If you are planning on visiting the Great Barrier Reef or simply interested in learning more about it, then this is the perfect book for you!

©2004 Xavier ZImms (P)2018 Proxy Publishing

Narrator: Heidi Allred
Author: Xavier Zimms
Length: 21 mins
Available on Audible
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A Commonwealth of Thieves

1 rating

Summary

It was 1786 when Arthur Phillip, an ambitious captain in the Royal Navy, was assigned the formidable task of organizing an expedition to Australia in order to establish a penal colony. The squalid and turbulent prisons of London were overflowing, and crime was on the rise. Even the hulks sifting at anchor in the Thames were packed with malcontent criminals and petty thieves. So the English government decided to undertake the unprecedented move of shipping off its convicts to a largely unexplored landmass at the other end of the world. Using the personal journals and documents that were kept during this expedition, historian/novelist Thomas Keneally re-creates the grueling overseas voyage, a hellish, suffocating journey that claimed the lives of many convicts. Miraculously, the fleet reached the shores of what was then called New South Wales in 1788, and after much trial and error, the crew managed to set up a rudimentary yet vibrant settlement. As governor of the colony, Phillip took on the challenges of dealing with unruly convicts, disgruntled officers, a bewildered and sometimes hostile native population, as well as such serious matters as food shortages and disease. Moving beyond Phillip, Keneally offers captivating portrayals of Aborigines, who both aided and opposed Phillip, and of the settlers, including convicts who were determined to overcome their pasts and begin anew. With the authority of a renowned historian and the narrative grace of a brilliant novelist, Thomas Keneally offers an insider's perspective into the dramatic saga of the birth of a vibrant society in an unfamiliar land. A Commonwealth of Thieves immerses us in the fledgling penal colony and conjures up colorful scenes of the joy and heartbreak, the thrills and hardships that characterized those first four improbable years.

©2006 Thomas Keneally (P)2006 Tantor Media, Inc.

Narrator: Simon Vance
Length: 12 hrs and 26 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Aborigines and Maori: The History of the Indigenous Peoples in Australia and New Zealand

The Aborigines and Maori: The History of the Indigenous Peoples in Australia and New Zealand

Summary

A land of almost three million square miles has lain since time immemorial on the southern flank of the planet, so isolated that it remained almost entirely outside of European knowledge until 1770. From there, however, the subjugation of Australia would take place rapidly. Within 20 years of the first British settlements being established, the British presence in Terra Australis was secure, and no other major power was likely to mount a challenge. In 1815, Napoleon would be defeated at Waterloo, and soon afterward would be standing on the barren cliffs of Saint Helena, staring across the limitless Atlantic. The French, without a fleet, were out of the picture, the Germans were yet to establish a unified state, let alone an overseas empire of any significance, and the Dutch were no longer counted among the top tier of European powers.  In 1769, Captain James Cook’s historic expedition in the region would lead to an English claim on Australia, but before he reached Australia, he sailed near New Zealand and spent weeks mapping part of New Zealand’s coast. Thus, he was also one of the first to observe and take note of the indigenous peoples of the two islands. His instructions from the Admiralty were to endeavor at all costs to cultivate friendly relations with tribes and peoples he might encounter and to regard any native people as the natural and legal possessors of any land they were found to occupy. Cook, of course, was not engaged on an expedition of colonization, so when he encountered for the first time a war party of Maori, he certainly had no intention of challenging their overlordship of Aotearoa, although he certainly was interested in discovering more about them.  Taking into account similarities of appearance, customs and languages spread across a vast region of scattered islands, it was obvious that the Polynesian race emerged from a single origin, and that origin Cook speculated was somewhere in the Malay Peninsula or the “East Indies”. In this regard, he was not too far from the truth. The origins of the Polynesian race have been fiercely debated since then, and it was only relatively recently, through genetic and linguistic research, that it can now be stated with certainty that the Polynesian race originated on the Chinese mainland and the islands of Taiwan, the Philippines, Malaysia, and Indonesia. Oceania was, indeed, the last major region of the Earth to be penetrated and settled by people, and Polynesia was the last region of Oceania to be inhabited. The vehicle of this expansion was the outrigger canoe, and aided by tides and wind patterns, a migration along the Malay Archipelago, and across the wide expanses of the South Pacific, began sometime between 3,000 and 1,000 BC, reaching the Western Polynesian Islands in about 900 BC. 

©2018 Charles River Editors (P)2018 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Dan Gallagher
Length: 3 hrs and 25 mins
Available on Audible
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Captive Paradise

2 ratings

Summary

In the tradition of Nathaniel Philbrick and David McCullough comes the first full-scale narrative history of Hawaii, an epic tale of empire, industry, war, and culture. The most recent state to join the union, Hawaii is the only one to have once been a royal kingdom. After its discovery by Captain Cook in the late 18th century, Hawaii was fought over by European powers determined to take advantage of its position as the crossroads of the Pacific. The arrival of the first missionaries marked the beginning of the struggle between a native culture with its ancient gods, sexual libertinism, and rites of human sacrifice and the rigid values of the Calvinists. While Hawaii's royal rulers adopted Christianity, they also fought to preserve their ancient ways. But the success of the ruthless American sugar barons sealed their fate, and in1893 the American Marines overthrew Liliuokalani, the last queen of Hawaii. Captive Paradise is the story of King Kamehameha I, the Conqueror, who unified the islands through terror and bloodshed but whose dynasty succumbed to inbreeding; of Gilded Age tycoons like Claus Spreckels, who brilliantly outmaneuvered his competitors; of firebrand Lorrin Thurston, who was determined that Hawaii be ruled by whites; of President McKinley, who presided over the eventual annexation of the islands. Not since James Michener's classic novel Hawaii has there been such a vibrant and compelling portrait of an extraordinary place and its people.

©2014 James L. Haley (P)2014 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

Narrator: Joe Barrett
Length: 13 hrs and 33 mins
Available on Audible
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Dark Emu

Summary

A completely accessible, compelling and riveting account of pre-invasion Aboriginal agricultural systems. Dark Emu argues for a reconsideration of the 'hunter-gatherer' tag for pre-colonial Aboriginal Australians and attempts to rebut the colonial myths that have worked to justify dispossession. Accomplished author Bruce Pascoe provides compelling evidence from the diaries of early explorers that suggests that systems of food production and land management have been blatantly understated in modern retellings of early Aboriginal history, and that a new look at Australia's past is required.

©2014 Bruce Pascoe (P)2017 Bolinda audio

Narrator: Bruce Pascoe
Author: Bruce Pascoe
Length: 5 hrs and 36 mins
Available on Audible
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Batavia's Graveyard

1 rating

Summary

It was the autumn of 1628, and the Batavia, the Dutch East India Company's flagship, was loaded with a king's ransom in gold, silver, and gems for her maiden voyage to Java. The Batavia was the pride of the company's fleet, a tangible symbol of the world's richest and most powerful commercial monopoly. She set sail with great fanfare, but the Batavia and her gold would never reach Java, for the company had also sent along a new employee, Jeronimus Corneliszoon, a bankrupt and disgraced man who possessed disarming charisma and dangerously heretical ideas. With the help of a few disgruntled sailors, Jeronimus soon sparked a mutiny that seemed certain to succeed - but for one unplanned event: In the dark morning hours of June 3, the Batavia smashed through a coral reef and ran aground on a small chain of islands near Australia. The commander of the ship and the skipper evaded the mutineers by escaping in a tiny lifeboat and setting a course for Java to summon help. Nearly all of the passengers survived the wreck and found themselves trapped on a bleak coral island without water, food, or shelter. Leaderless, unarmed, and unaware of Jeronimus' treachery, they were at the mercy of the mutineers.

©2002 Mike Dash (P)2016 Tantor

Narrator: Guy Bethell
Author: Mike Dash
Length: 12 hrs and 36 mins
Available on Audible
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True Girt

1 rating

Summary

First there was Girt. Now comes...True Girt. In this side-splitting sequel to his best-selling history, David Hunt takes us to the Australian frontier. This was the Wild South, home to hardy pioneers, gun-slinging bushrangers, directionally challenged explorers, nervous indigenous people, Caroline Chisholm and sheep. Lots of sheep. True Girt introduces Thomas Davey, the hard-drinking Tasmanian governor who invented the Blow My Skull cocktail, and Captain Moonlite, Australia's most infamous LGBTI bushranger. Meet William Nicholson, the Melbourne hipster who gave Australia the steam-powered coffee roaster and the world the secret ballot. And say hello to Harry, the first camel used in Australian exploration, who shot dead his owner, the explorer John Horrocks. Learn how Truganini's death inspired the Martian invasion of Earth. Discover the role of Hall and Oates in the Myall Creek Massacre. And be reminded why you should never ever smoke with the Wild Colonial Boy and Mad Dan Morgan. David Hunt is the author of Girt: The Unauthorised History of Australia, which won the 2014 Indie Award for nonfiction and was short-listed in both the NSW Premier's Literary Awards and Australian Book Industry Awards. David is a comedy writer, historian and children's book author. He has a birthmark that looks like Tasmania, only smaller and not as far south.

©2016 David Hunt (P)2016 Audible, Ltd

Narrator: David Hunt
Author: David Hunt
Length: 16 hrs and 16 mins
Available on Audible
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Convict Colony

Summary

Best-selling historian David Hill tells the story of the first three decades of Britain's earliest colony in Australia in a fresh and compelling way. The British plan to settle Australia was a high-risk venture. We now take it for granted that the first colony was the basis of one of the most successful nations in the world today. But in truth, the New World of the 18th century was dotted with failed colonies, and New South Wales nearly joined them.  The motley crew of unruly marines and bedraggled convicts who arrived at Botany Bay in 1788 in leaky boats nearly starved to death. They could easily have been murdered by hostile locals, been overwhelmed by an attack from French or Spanish expeditions or been brought undone by the Castle Hill uprising of 1804. Yet through fortunate decisions, a few remarkably good leaders and, most of all, good luck, Sydney survived and thrived.

©2019 David Hill (P)2020 W. F. Howes Ltd

Narrator: Conrad Coleby
Author: David Hill
Length: 9 hrs and 13 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Girt

Girt

4 ratings

Summary

Girt. No word could better capture the essence of Australia.... In this hilarious history, David Hunt reveals the truth of Australia's past, from megafauna to Macquarie - the cock-ups and curiosities, the forgotten eccentrics and Eureka moments that have made us who we are. Girt introduces forgotten heroes like Mary McLoghlin, transported for the crime of "felony of sock", and Trim the cat, who beat a French monkey to become the first animal to circumnavigate Australia. It recounts the misfortunes of the escaped Irish convicts who set out to walk from Sydney to China, guided only by a hand-drawn paper compass, and explains the role of the coconut in Australia's only military coup. Our nation's beginnings are steeped in the strange, the ridiculous, and the frankly bizarre. Girt proudly reclaims these stories for all of us. Not to listen to it would be un-Australian.

©2013 David Hunt (P)2015 Audible, Ltd

Narrator: David Hunt
Author: David Hunt
Length: 6 hrs and 43 mins
Available on Audible
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Convict-Era Port Arthur

Summary

Detailing the development of the prison and its outlying stations, including its dreaded coal mines and providing an account of the changing views to convict rehabilitation, Convict-Era Port Arthur focuses in on a number of individuals, telling the story through their eyes. Charles O'Hara Booth, a significant commandant of Port Arthur; Mark Jeffrey, a convict who became the grave digger on the Island of the Dead; and William Thompson, who arrived just as the new probation system started and who was forced to work in the treacherous coal mines.  Convict-Era Port Arthur will for the first time provide a comprehensive history of Port Arthur, its horrors and its changing role over a 50-year period. In gripping detail, using the experiences and words of the convicts, soldiers and administrators who spent time there, David W. Cameron brings to life these deeply miserable days.

©2021 David W. Cameron (P)2021 Penguin Random House Australia

Narrator: Ant Neate
Length: 12 hrs and 2 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Mutiny on the Bounty

Mutiny on the Bounty

10 ratings

Summary

The mutiny on HMS Bounty, in the South Pacific on 28 April 1789, is one of history's truly great stories - a tale of human drama, intrigue and adventure of the highest order - and in the hands of Peter FitzSimons it comes to life as never before.   Commissioned by the Royal Navy to collect breadfruit plants from Tahiti and take them to the West Indies, the Bounty's crew found themselves in a tropical paradise. Five months later, they did not want to leave. Under the leadership of Fletcher Christian, most of the crew mutinied soon after sailing from Tahiti, setting Captain William Bligh and 18 loyal crewmen adrift in a small open boat. In one of history's great feats of seamanship, Bligh navigated this tiny vessel for 3,618 nautical miles to Timor.   Fletcher Christian and the mutineers sailed back to Tahiti, where most remained and were later tried for mutiny. But Christian, along with eight fellow mutineers and some Tahitian men and women, sailed off into the unknown, eventually discovering the isolated Pitcairn Island - at the time not even marked on British maps - and settling there.   This astonishing story is historical adventure at its very best, encompassing the mutiny, Bligh's monumental achievement in navigating to safety, and Fletcher Christian and the mutineers' own epic journey from the sensual paradise of Tahiti to the outpost of Pitcairn Island. The mutineers' descendants live on Pitcairn to this day, amid swirling stories and rumours of past sexual transgressions and present-day repercussions. Mutiny on the Bounty is a sprawling, dramatic tale of intrigue, bravery and sheer boldness, told with the accuracy of historical detail and total command of story that are Peter FitzSimons' trademarks.

©2018 Peter FitzSimons (P)2018 Hachette Australia Audio

Narrator: Michael Carman
Length: 22 hrs and 32 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Orca

Orca

Summary

Drawing on interviews, official records, private archives, and his own family history, Jason M. Colby tells the exhilarating and often heartbreaking story of how people came to love the ocean's greatest predator.  Historically reviled as dangerous pests, killer whales were dying by the hundreds, even thousands, by the 1950s - the victims of whalers, fishermen, and even the US military. In the Pacific Northwest, fishermen shot them, scientists harpooned them, and the Canadian government mounted a machine gun to eliminate them. But that all changed in 1965, when Seattle entrepreneur Ted Griffin became the first person to swim and perform with a captive killer whale. The show proved wildly popular, and he began capturing and selling others, including Sea World's first Shamu.   Over the following decade, live display transformed views of Orcinus orca. The public embraced killer whales as charismatic and friendly, while scientists enjoyed their first access to live orcas. Yet even as Northwesterners taught the world to love whales, they came to oppose their captivity and to fight for the freedom of a marine predator that had become a regional icon.

©2018 Oxford University Press (P)2019 HighBridge Company

Narrator: Paul Heitsch
Length: 14 hrs and 24 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for The Ship That Never Was

The Ship That Never Was

Summary

The greatest escape story of Australian colonial history by the son of Australia's best-loved storyteller.  In 1823, cockney sailor and chancer James Porter was convicted of stealing a stack of beaver furs and transported halfway around the world to Van Diemen's Land. After several escape attempts from the notorious penal colony, Porter, who told authorities he was a 'beer-machine maker', was sent to Sarah Island, known in Van Diemen's Land as hell on earth.  Many had tried to escape Sarah Island; few had succeeded. But when Governor George Arthur announced that the place would be closed and its prisoners moved to the new penal station of Port Arthur, Porter, along with a motley crew of other prisoners, pulled off an audacious escape. Wresting control of the ship they'd been building to transport them to their fresh hell, the escapees instead sailed all the way to Chile. What happened next is stranger than fiction, a fitting outcome for this true-life picaresque tale.  The Ship That Never Was is the entertaining and rollicking story of what is surely the greatest escape in Australian colonial history. James Porter, whose memoirs were the inspiration for Marcus Clarke's For the Term of His Natural Life, is an original Australian larrikin whose ingenuity, gift of the gab and refusal to buckle under authority make him an irresistible antihero who deserves a place in our history.

©2018 Adam Courtenay (P)2018 Bolinda Publishing Pty Ltd

Narrator: John Eastman
Length: 9 hrs and 39 mins
Available on Audible
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A Shorter History of Australia

3 ratings

Summary

After a lifetime of research and debate on Australian and international history, Geoffrey Blainey is well-placed to introduce us to the people who have played a part and to guide us through the events which have created the Australian identity: the mania for spectator sport, the suspicion of the tall poppy, the rivalries of Catholic and Protestant, Sydney and Melbourne, new and old homelands, the conflicts of war abroad and race at home, the importance of technology, the recognition of our Aboriginal past and Native Title, the successes and failures of the nation. For this enlarged edition, Blainey has rewritten or expanded on various episodes and themes, making changes to almost every page. He has described significant events and trends of the early-20th century. A final chapter summarises key factors that shaped and still shape this country's history.

©2009 Geoffrey Blainey (P)2010 Bolinda Publishing Pty Ltd

Narrator: Humphrey Bower
Length: 10 hrs and 59 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for Down South

Down South

Summary

In Down South, writer Bruce Ansley goes on a journey back to his beloved South Island.  From Curio Bay to Golden Bay, in Down South writer Bruce Ansley sets off on a vast expedition across the South Island, Te Waipounamu, visiting the places and people who hold clues to the South's famous character. Not so very long ago, the South Island had most of New Zealand's people and just about all of the money. Gold miners found fortunes in the hills and rivers, sheep barons straddled mountains, valleys, and plains. Wealthy Southerners ruled the government.  Where now lies the South Island's golden fleece? And what is its future?

©2020 Bruce Ansley (P)2020 HarperCollins Publishers

Narrator: Kevin Keys
Author: Bruce Ansley
Length: 12 hrs and 10 mins
Available on Audible
Cover art for James Cook

James Cook

Summary

The name Captain James Cook is one of the most recognisable in Australian history - an almost mythic figure who is often discussed, celebrated, reviled and debated.    But who was the real James Cook?   This Yorkshire farm boy would go on to become the foremost mariner, scientist, navigator and cartographer of his era, and to personally map a third of the globe. His great voyages of discovery were incredible feats of seamanship and navigation. Leading a crew of men into uncharted territories, Cook would face the best and worst of humanity as he took himself and his crew to the edge of the known world - and beyond.   With his masterful storytelling talent, Peter FitzSimons brings the real James Cook to life. Focusing on his most iconic expedition, the voyage of the Endeavour, where Cook first set foot on Australian and New Zealand soil, FitzSimons contrasts Cook against another figure who looms large in Australasian history: Joseph Banks, the aristocratic botanist.  As they left England, Banks, a rich, famous playboy, was everything that Cook was not. The voyage tested Cook's character and would help define his legacy.   Now, 240 years after James Cook's death, FitzSimons reveals what kind of man James was at heart. His strengths, his weaknesses, his passions and pursuits, failures and successes.   James Cook reveals the man behind the myth.

©2019 Peter FitzSimons (P)2019 Hachette Australia Audio

Narrator: Michael Carman
Length: 21 hrs and 23 mins
Available on Audible
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The Last True Story of Titanic

Summary

Although many denied it, a giant ocean liner was dying. The superstitious nodded their heads, knowing her fate had already been sealed. The freezing Atlantic crept up to the forecastle head as the massive vessel, with all her lights aglow, slowly, almost imperceptibly, sank at the bow.

©1998, 1999 James G. Clary (P)2015 James G. Clary

Narrator: John Rayment
Length: 4 hrs and 22 mins
Available on Audible
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The Maori

2 ratings

Summary

In 1769, Captain James Cook’s historic expedition in the region would lead to an English claim on Australia, but before he reached Australia, he sailed near New Zealand and spent weeks mapping part of New Zealand’s coast. Thus, he was also one of the first to observe and take note of the indigenous peoples of the two islands. His instructions from the Admiralty were to endeavor at all costs to cultivate friendly relations with tribes and peoples he might encounter, and to regard any native people as the natural and legal possessors of any land they were found to occupy. Cook, of course, was not engaged on an expedition of colonization, so when he encountered for the first time a war party of Maori, he certainly had no intention of challenging their overlordship of Aotearoa, although he certainly was interested in discovering more about them.  Approaching from the east, having rounded Cape Horn and calling in at Tahiti, the HMS Endeavour arrived off the coast of New Zealand, and two days later it dropped anchor in what would later be known as Poverty Bay. No sign of life or habitation was seen until on the morning of the 9 October when smoke was observed to be rising inland. Cook and a group of sailors set off for shore in two boats and leaving four men behind to mind the boats, the remainder set off inland over a line of low hills. The sentries, however, were surprised by the arrival of a group of four Maori, who adopted an aggressive posture, and when one lifted a lance to hurl, he was immediately shot down. The impression that all of this left on Cook and the scientific members of the expedition was mixed. By then there had already been several encounters with Polynesian people scattered about the South Pacific, and although occasionally warlike, there were none quite so aggressive as the Maori. In fairness, it must be added that the Maori understanding of Cook’s appearance, and what it represented was by necessity partial, and in approaching it they simply fell back on default behavior, applicable to any stranger approaching their shores. Taking into account similarities of appearance, customs, and languages spread across a vast region of scattered islands, it was obvious that the Polynesian race emerged from a single origin, and that origin Cook speculated was somewhere in the Malay Peninsula or the “East Indies”. In this regard, he was not too far from the truth. The origins of the Polynesian race have been fiercely debated since then, and it was only relatively recently, through genetic and linguistic research, that it can now be stated with certainty that the Polynesian race originated on the Chinese mainland and the islands of Taiwan, the Philippines, Malaysia, and Indonesia. Oceania was, indeed, the last major region of the Earth to be penetrated and settled by people, and Polynesia was the last region of Oceania to be inhabited.

©2018 Charles River Editors (P)2018 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Dan Gallagher
Length: 1 hr and 48 mins
Available on Audible
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The Bush

Summary

An enthralling journey, showcasing Watson's trademark literary gift and sardonic wit, through the Australian landscape and character. While most Australians live in cities clinging to the coastal fringe, our sense of what an Australian is, or should be, is drawn from the vast and varied inland called the bush. But what do we mean by 'the bush', and how has it shaped us? Starting with his forebears' battle to drive back nature and eke a living from the land, Don Watson explores the bush as it was and as it now is: the triumphs and the ruination, the commonplace and the bizarre, the stories we like to tell about ourselves and the national character, and those we don't. A milestone work of memoir, travel writing and history, The Bush takes us on a profoundly revelatory and entertaining journey through the Australian landscape and character.

©2014 Don Watson (P)2017 Bolinda Publishing Pty Ltd

Narrator: Don Watson
Length: 13 hrs and 16 mins
Available on Audible
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The Ghost and the Bounty Hunter

Summary

Just after Christmas 1803, convict William Buckley fled an embryonic settlement in the land of the Kulin nation (now the Port Phillip area), to take his chances in the wilderness. A few months later, the local Aboriginal people found the six-foot-five former soldier near death. Believing he was a lost kinsman returned from the dead, they took him in, and for 32 years Buckley lived as a Wadawurrung man, learning his adopted tribe's language, skills and methods to survive. The outside world finally caught up with Buckley in 1835, after John Batman, a bounty hunter from Van Diemen's Land, arrived in the area, seeking to acquire and control the perfect pastureland around the bay. What happened next saw the Wadawurrung betrayed and Buckley eventually broken. The theft of Kulin country would end in the birth of a city. The frontier wars had begun. By the best-selling author of The Ship That Never Was, The Ghost and the Bounty Hunter is a fascinating and poignant true story from Australian colonial history.

©2020 Adam Courtenay (P)2020 Bolinda Publishing Pty Ltd

Narrator: John Derum
Length: 9 hrs and 28 mins
Available on Audible
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Voyagers of the Titanic

1 rating

Summary

Late in the night of April 14, 1912, the mighty Titanic, a passenger liner traveling from Southampton, England, to New York City, struck an iceberg four hundred miles south of Newfoundland. Its sinking over the next two and a half hours brought the ship—mythological in name and size—100 years of infamy. Of the 2,240 people aboard the ship, 1,517 perished either by drowning or by freezing to death in the frigid North Atlantic waters. What followed the disaster was tantamount to a worldwide outpouring of grief: In New York, Paris, London, and other major cities, people lined the streets and crowded around the offices of the White Star Line, the Titanic’s shipping company, to inquire for news of their loved ones and for details about the lives of some of the famous people of their time. While many accounts of the Titanic’s voyage focus on the technical or mechanical aspects of why the ship sank, Voyagers of the Titanic follows the stories of the men, women, and children whose lives intersected on the vessel’s fateful last day, covering the full range of first, second, and third class­—from plutocrats and captains of industry to cobblers and tailors looking for a better life in America. Richard Davenport-Hines delves into the fascinating lives of those who ate, drank, reveled, dreamed, and died aboard the mythic ship: from John Jacob Astor IV, the wealthiest person on board, whose comportment that night was subject to speculation and gossip for years after the event, to Archibald Butt, the much-beloved military aide to Theodore Roosevelt and William Taft, who died helping others into the Titanic’s few lifeboats. With magnificent prose, Voyagers of the Titanic also brings to life the untold stories of the ship’s middle and third classes—clergymen, teachers, hoteliers, engineers, shopkeepers, counterjumpers, and clerks—each of whom had a story that not only illuminates the fascinating ship but also the times in which it sailed. In addition, Davenport-Hines explores the fascinating politics behind the Titanic’s creation, which involved larger-than-life figures such as J. P. Morgan, the ship’s owner, and Lord Pirrie, the ship’s builder. The memory of this tragedy still remains a part of the American psyche and Voyagers of the Titanic brings that clear night back to us with all of its drama and pathos.

©2012 Richard Davenport-Hines (P)2012 HarperCollinsPublishers

Narrator: Robin Sachs
Length: 11 hrs and 18 mins
Available on Audible
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Great South Land

Summary

For many, the colonial story of Australia starts with Captain Cook's discovery of the east coast in 1770, but it was some 164 years before his historic voyage that European mariners began their romance with the immensity of the Australian continent. Between 1606 and 1688, while the British had their hands full with the Gunpowder Plot and the English Civil War, it was highly skilled Dutch seafarers who, by design, chance or shipwreck, discovered and mapped the majority of the vast, unknown waters and land masses in the Indian and Southern Oceans. This is the setting that sees Rob Mundle back on the water with another sweeping and powerful account of Australian maritime history. It is the story of 17th-century European mariners - sailors, adventurers and explorers - who became transfixed by the idea of the existence of a Great South Land: "Terra Australis Incognita". Rob takes you aboard the tiny ship, Duyfken, in 1606 when Dutch navigator and explorer Willem Janszoon and his 20-man crew became the first Europeans to discover Australia on the coast of the Gulf of Carpentaria. In the decades that followed, more Dutch mariners, like Hartog, Tasman, and Janszoon (for a second time), discovered and mapped the majority of the coast of what would become Australia. Yet, incredibly, the Dutch made no effort to lay claim to it or establish any settlements. This process began with British explorer and former pirate William Dampier on the west coast in 1688, and by the time Captain Cook arrived in 1770, all that was to be done was chart the east coast and claim what the Dutch had discovered.

©2015 Rob Mundle (P)2015 Bolinda

Narrator: Paul English
Author: Rob Mundle
Length: 9 hrs and 44 mins
Available on Audible
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Under Full Sail

1 rating

Summary

How the mighty clipper ships transformed Australia from convict outpost to a nation. More than one million Australians can trace their heritage to the migrant ships of the mid- to late 19th century.  The story of the clipper ships, and the tens of thousands of migrants they brought to the Australian colony of the 19th century, is one of the world's great migration stories. For anyone who travelled to Australia before 1850, it was a long and arduous journey that could take as much as four months. With the arrival of the clipper ships and favourable winds, the journey from England could be done in a little over half this time. It was a revolution in travel that made the clipper ships the jet airlines of their day, bringing keen and willing migrants 'down under' in record time, all hell-bent on making their fortunes in Australia.  Rob Mundle is back on the water, with a ripping story that starts on the sea, aboard a clipper ship charging across the Southern Ocean, laden with passengers heading for Melbourne in response to the lure of gold. Brimming with countless stories of the magnificent ships and fearless (and feckless) characters we find on them, like Englishman 'Bully' Forbes and American 'Bully' Waterman driving their ships to the limit and the tragic legacy of the many shipwrecks that were so much a part of this era. 

©2017 Rob Mundle (P)2018 Bolinda Publishing Pty Ltd

Narrator: Paul English
Author: Rob Mundle
Length: 9 hrs and 53 mins
Available on Audible
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Uluru: The History and Legacy of the Australian Landmark Considered Sacred by the Local Aborigines

Summary

The magnificent monolith the locals call “Uluru”, situated in the heart of Australia, hovers over a patchy bed of desert poplars and spinifex grasslands. The pleasant, but otherwise unexceptional, surroundings of the spellbinding sandstone landform only further accentuates its majesty - one that can be appreciated from a variety of angles.  To lime-colored budgerigars, mighty brown falcons, passengers in planes and helicopters, and other creatures blessed with the gift of flight, the free-form rock is reminiscent of the fossil of a spiky fish, a misshapen arrowhead, or perhaps a peculiar, ocher-tinged seashell peeking out of the sand. To those gazing upon the natural gem on solid ground, the flat-topped, burnt sienna beauty marked with character-forming dimples, ripples, and ridges looks more like a sleeping, 1000-year-old turtle, particularly through squinted eyes.    Its striking appearance aside, Uluru, also known as “Ayers Rock”, is far more than an unmissable landmark. Uluru represents an inimitable symbol of life and culture, and a place of worship sacred to the region's aboriginal inhabitants. Given the long and riveting history attached to this hallowed rock, the aura of mysticality and mystery that clings to Uluru should come as no surprise. Not only does the rock's flaky surface change color throughout the day - going from a deep violet with hints of gray to a light lilac to a fiery orange-red during sunrise and from its usual apricot-gold to a faded orange to a dreamy purplish-pink at dusk - Uluru, they say, is an endless source of inexplicable happenings and paranormal occurrences.    Although the natives have spared no effort in underscoring the rock's spiritual and cultural significance to the aborigines, their pleas for visitors to respect the rock have been repeatedly ignored. Indeed, the lack of courtesy displayed toward Uluru has heightened in recent years, and the land's inhabitants have been forced to navigate the so-called age of the “social media influencer”. Thousands of tourists swarm the rock every year, sticking their head through aboriginal spy holes and modeling pretentious yoga poses with captions to match.  Perhaps, most notoriously, a 25-year-old French-born exotic dancer named Alizee Sery angered netizens around the globe in 2010 when she hiked up to the top of Uluru and stripped down to nothing but an Akubra cattleman hat, bikini bottoms, and white go-go boots. Sery spoke to various news outlets shortly thereafter and defended the strip tease, filmed for a documentary, which she claimed was meant as an homage to the indigenous peoples. According to Sery’s partially paternalistic explanation, “My project is a tribute to the greatness of the rock. What we need to remember is that, traditionally, the aboriginal people were living naked. So, stripping down was a return to what it was like.”  Aboriginal elders, on the other hand, branded the attention-seeking stunt “stupid” and compared it to relieving oneself on the Vatican steps. As Kon Vatskalis, minister of the Northern Territory government, put it, “How would...French people feel if an Australian danced semi-naked on the altar of the Notre Dame?” Uluru: The History and Legacy of the Australian Landmark Considered Sacred by the Local Aborigines examines the geological origins of the famous rock, its most interesting characteristics, and its history. Along with details about important people, places, and events, you will learn about Uluru like never before.

©2019 Charles River Editors (P)2019 Charles River Editors

Narrator: David Bernard
Length: 1 hr and 50 mins
Available on Audible
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The Voyage of Their Life

Summary

In August 1948, 545 passengers boarded an overcrowded, clapped-out vessel in Marseilles to face an uncertain future in Australia and New Zealand. They came from displaced persons camps in Germany, death camps in Poland, labour camps in Hungary, gulags in Siberia and stony Aegean islands. There were those who had been hunted by the Nazis and those who had welcomed them; those who had followed the Communists and those who had fled them. Diane Armstrong set sail on the Derna with her parents when she was nine years old. Like a detective searching for clues, she has located over a hundred of the passengers. Through their recollections and memorabilia, as well as archival documents, she has recreated the voyage and traced what became of their hopes and dreams. The result is the unique portrayal of a migrant ship and its passengers.

©2001 Diane Armstrong (P)2004 Bolinda Publishing Pty Ltd

Length: 18 hrs and 30 mins
Available on Audible
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Tough Country

Summary

Tall tales of bushmen, bulldozers and back-country blokes "It was the mid-1970s and I was about eight, I thought it was completely normal for your old man to pull out a high-powered deer-hunting rifle and fire it through the kitchen door from the breakfast table..." In the 1970s and 80s, Barry Bellamy was a fair old bushman, traversing the back-country from Hawke's Bay to the far north in a blue ex-airforce Land Rover. His son Mike would join him as he took up work, wherever he could get it.  Tough Country is Mike's story, about a bygone era of bushmen, scrub-cutters, hunters and shepherds.  Later, Mike forged his own life working on the land, and his stories of the characters of the 1980s and 90s, from tradies to digger-drivers, are as hilarious as they are quintessentially Kiwi. 

©2020 Mike Bellamy (P)2020 HarperCollins Publishers

Author: Mike Bellamy
Length: 7 hrs and 18 mins
Available on Audible
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The British Subjugation of Australia: The History of British Colonization and the Conquest of the Aboriginal Australians

Summary

“It is quite time that our children were taught a little more about their country, for shame’s sake.” - Henry Lawson, Australian poet A land of almost 3 million square miles has lain since time immemorial on the southern flank of the planet, so isolated that it remained almost entirely outside of European knowledge until 1770. From there, however, the subjugation of Australia would take place rapidly. Within 20 years of the first British settlements being established, the British presence in Terra Australis was secure, and no other major power was likely to mount a challenge. In 1815, Napoleon would be defeated at Waterloo, and soon afterwards would be standing on the barren cliffs of Saint Helena, staring across the limitless Atlantic. The French, without a fleet, were out of the picture, the Germans were yet to establish a unified state, let alone an overseas empire of any significance, and the Dutch were no longer counted among the top tier of European powers.  Australia lay at an enormous distance from London, and its administration was barely supervised. Thus, its development was slow in the beginning, and its function remained narrowly defined, but as the 19th century progressed and peace took hold over Europe, things began to change. Immigration was steady, and the small spores of European habitation on the continent steadily grew. At the same time, the Royal Navy found itself with enormous resources of men and ships at a time when there was no war to fight. British sailors were thus employed for survey and exploration work, and the great expanses of Australia attracted particular interest. It was an exciting time, and an exciting age - the world was slowly coming under European sway, and Britain was rapidly emerging as its leader.

©2018 Charles River Editors (P)2018 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Colin Fluxman
Length: 1 hr and 38 mins
Available on Audible
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The Great Barrier Reef

Summary

"Coral is a very beautiful and unusual animal. Each coral head consists of thousand[s] of individual polyps. These polyps are continually budding and branching into genetically identical neighbors." (Antony Garrett List) People have always loved to build things, whether it's a feat of engineering in an underground subway or the construction of the world's tallest skyscraper. Thus, it's somewhat ironic that the largest structure ever built was not made by humans, but by incredibly tiny organisms known as coral polyps. Over the course of tens of thousands of years, these small organisms have put together a collection of nearly 3,000 reefs that form a collective stretching across 130,000 square miles. It is often mistakenly claimed that the Great Wall of China can be seen in space, but it's absolutely true that the enormous Great Barrier Reef is visible. The sheer size of the Great Barrier Reef is mind boggling, but its importance extends far past its physical extent. Put simply, the Great Barrier Reef is one of the most beautiful spots on the planet, offering kaleidoscopic colors thanks to the coral and the species that call it home. This is understandable because a staggering number of species inhabit the Great Barrier Reef, ranging from starfish and turtles, to alligators and birds. Scientists have counted about 1,500 different fish species that use the reef, and it's estimated that 1.5 million birds use the site. In designating it a World Heritage Site, UNESCO wrote of the Great Barrier Reef, "The Great Barrier Reef is a site of remarkable variety and beauty on the north-east coast of Australia. It contains the world's largest collection of coral reefs...."

©2012 Charles River Editors (P)2015 Charles River Editors

Narrator: Jamie Ecklund
Length: 1 hr and 24 mins
Available on Audible
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Race to Hawaii

Summary

Today, a trip to Hawaii is a simple six-hour flight from the West Coast. But almost a century ago, the first flights to Hawaii required a nerve-racking and uncertain 26-hour journey to isolated and elusive islands located in the middle of the world's largest ocean. Pilots prayed they would encounter land after flying a full day and night across 2,400 miles of the open Pacific. Race to Hawaii chronicles the thrilling first flights to Hawaii in the 1920s, during the Golden Age of Aviation. These journeys were fraught with danger. To reach the tiny islands, fearless pilots flew unreliable and fragile aircraft outfitted with primitive air-navigation equipment. The first attempts were made by the US Navy in the flying boat PN-9 No. One, whose crew endured a harrowing crossing. Next were Army Air Corps aviators and a civilian pilot, who informally raced each other to Hawaii in the weeks after Charles Lindbergh landed the Spirit of St. Louis in Paris. Finally came the Dole Derby, an unprecedented 1927 air race in which eight planes set off at once across the Pacific, all eager to reach the islands first and claim a cash prize offered by "Pineapple King" James Dole. Military men, barnstormers, a schoolteacher, a Wall Street bond salesman, a Hollywood stunt flyer, and veteran World War aces all encountered every type of hazard during their perilous flights, from fuel shortages to failed engines, forced sea landings and severe fatigue, to navigational errors. With so many pilots taking aim at the far-flung islands in so many different types of planes, everyone wondered who would reach Hawaii first, or at all.

©2018 Jason Ryan (P)2018 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

Author: Jason Ryan
Length: 11 hrs and 56 mins
Available on Audible
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Lost Kingdom

Summary

First colonized around 200 A.D. by intrepid Polynesian islanders, Hawaii existed for hundreds of years in splendid isolation. Foreigners did not visit the islands until 1788, when Captain Cook, looking for the fabled Northwest Passage, stumbled upon this nation with its own belief system and culture. Three decades later, fourteen Calvinist missionaries left Boston bound for Hawaii, and when they arrived they converted the royal family to Christianity, and set up missionary schools where English was taught. A thriving monarchy had ruled over Hawaii for generations. Taro fields and fish ponds had long sustained native Hawaiians but sugar plantations had been gradually subsuming them. This fractured, vulnerable Hawaii was the country that Queen Lili‘uokalani, or Lili‘u, inherited when she came to power at the end of the nineteenth century. Her predecessor had signed away many of the monarchy’s rights, but while Lili‘u was trying to put into place a constitution that would reinstate them, other factions were plotting annexation. With the help of the American envoy, the USS Boston steamed into Honolulu harbor, and Marines landed and marched to the palace, inciting the Queen’s overthrow. The annexation of Hawaii was extremely controversial; the issue caused heated debates in the Senate and President Cleveland gave a strongly worded speech opposing it. This was the first time America had reached beyond the borders of the continental U.S. in an act of imperialism. It was not until President McKinley was elected and the Spanish-American War erupted, that Hawaii became a critical strategic asset, and annexation finally passed Congress in 1898.

©2012 Julia Flynn Siler (P)2012 Brilliance Audio, Inc.

Narrator: Joyce Bean
Length: 10 hrs and 54 mins
Available on Audible
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Error Australis

Summary

Australia is a proud country full of proud people, but exactly what are we proud of? Comedian and history buff Ben Pobjie delves deep into Australia's past and has a good old rummage amongst the nation's personal effects. With wit, perspicacity and a healthily elastic attitude to historical accuracy, the great saga of Australia is unravelled like an old woolly jumper. For anyone who snoozed through history class at school, this is the book to get you all caught up.

©2016 Ben Pobjie (P)2016 W.F. Howes Ltd

Narrator: Jim Pike
Author: Ben Pobjie
Length: 9 hrs and 16 mins
Available on Audible